chiark / gitweb /
man: Minor typographic fixes to systemd.xml
authorOzan Çağlayan <ozan@pardus.org.tr>
Thu, 8 Jul 2010 16:34:09 +0000 (19:34 +0300)
committerLennart Poettering <lennart@poettering.net>
Thu, 8 Jul 2010 19:46:36 +0000 (21:46 +0200)
Fix some minor grammar and punctuation typos.

man/systemd.xml

index 4f4a588..0798f23 100644 (file)
                 configuration or dynamically from system state. Units
                 may be active (meaning started, bound, plugged in, ...
                 depending on the unit type), or inactive (meaning
                 configuration or dynamically from system state. Units
                 may be active (meaning started, bound, plugged in, ...
                 depending on the unit type), or inactive (meaning
-                stopped, unbound, unplugged, ...), as well is in the
+                stopped, unbound, unplugged, ...), as well as in the
                 process of being activated or deactivated,
                 i.e. between the two states. The following unit types
                 are available:</para>
                 process of being activated or deactivated,
                 i.e. between the two states. The following unit types
                 are available:</para>
                         systemd. They are described in <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.swap</refentrytitle><manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry>.</para></listitem>
 
                         <listitem><para>Path units may be used
                         systemd. They are described in <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.swap</refentrytitle><manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry>.</para></listitem>
 
                         <listitem><para>Path units may be used
-                        activate other services when file system
+                        to activate other services when file system
                         objects change or are modified. See
                         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.path</refentrytitle><manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry>.</para></listitem>
 
                         objects change or are modified. See
                         <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.path</refentrytitle><manvolnum>5</manvolnum></citerefentry>.</para></listitem>
 
                 <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.special</refentrytitle><manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry>.</para>
 
                 <para>On boot systemd activates the target unit
                 <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.special</refentrytitle><manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry>.</para>
 
                 <para>On boot systemd activates the target unit
-                <filename>default.target</filename> whose job it is to
+                <filename>default.target</filename> whose job is to
                 activate on-boot services and other on-boot units by
                 pulling them in via dependencies. Usually the unit
                 name is just an alias (symlink) for either
                 activate on-boot services and other on-boot units by
                 pulling them in via dependencies. Usually the unit
                 name is just an alias (symlink) for either
                 <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.special</refentrytitle><manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry>
                 for details about these target units.</para>
 
                 <citerefentry><refentrytitle>systemd.special</refentrytitle><manvolnum>7</manvolnum></citerefentry>
                 for details about these target units.</para>
 
-                <para>Processes systemd spawns ared placed in
+                <para>Processes systemd spawns are placed in
                 individual Linux control groups named after the unit
                 which they belong to in the private systemd
                 hierarchy. (see <ulink
                 individual Linux control groups named after the unit
                 which they belong to in the private systemd
                 hierarchy. (see <ulink
                 simply read as an alternative (though limited)
                 configuration file format. The SysV
                 <filename>/dev/initctl</filename> interface is
                 simply read as an alternative (though limited)
                 configuration file format. The SysV
                 <filename>/dev/initctl</filename> interface is
-                provided, and comaptibility implementations of the
-                various SysV client tools available. In addition to
-                that various established Unix functionality such as
+                provided, and compatibility implementations of the
+                various SysV client tools are available. In addition to
+                that, various established Unix functionality such as
                 <filename>/etc/fstab</filename> or the
                 <filename>utmp</filename> database are
                 supported.</para>
                 <filename>/etc/fstab</filename> or the
                 <filename>utmp</filename> database are
                 supported.</para>