chiark / gitweb /
doc: use expanded forms for written style
authorJan Engelhardt <jengelh@inai.de>
Fri, 27 Jun 2014 22:50:28 +0000 (00:50 +0200)
committerZbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek <zbyszek@in.waw.pl>
Sat, 28 Jun 2014 04:06:31 +0000 (00:06 -0400)
CODING_STYLE

index e192944..e22c1ed 100644 (file)
   more than one cause, it *really* should have "int" as return value
   for the error code.
 
-- Don't bother with error checking whether writing to stdout/stderr
+- Do not bother with error checking whether writing to stdout/stderr
   worked.
 
 - Do not log errors from "library" code, only do so from "main
-  program" code. (With one exception: it's OK to log with DEBUG level
+  program" code. (With one exception: it is OK to log with DEBUG level
   from any code, with the exception of maybe inner loops).
 
-- Always check OOM. There's no excuse. In program code, you can use
+- Always check OOM. There is no excuse. In program code, you can use
   "log_oom()" for then printing a short message, but not in "library" code.
 
 - Do not issue NSS requests (that includes user name and host name
   lookups involve synchronously talking to services that we would need
   to start up
 
-- Don't synchronously talk to any other service from PID 1, due to
+- Do not synchronously talk to any other service from PID 1, due to
   risk of deadlocks
 
 - Avoid fixed-size string buffers, unless you really know the maximum
   size and that maximum size is small. They are a source of errors,
   since they possibly result in truncated strings. It is often nicer
   to use dynamic memory, alloca() or VLAs. If you do allocate fixed-size
-  strings on the stack, then it's probably only OK if you either
+  strings on the stack, then it is probably only OK if you either
   use a maximum size such as LINE_MAX, or count in detail the maximum
   size a string can have. (DECIMAL_STR_MAX and DECIMAL_STR_WIDTH
   macros are your friends for this!)
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@
   doing something wrong!
 
 - Stay uniform. For example, always use "usec_t" for time
-  values. Don't usec mix msec, and usec and whatnot.
+  values. Do not usec mix msec, and usec and whatnot.
 
 - Make use of _cleanup_free_ and friends. It makes your code much
   nicer to read!
@@ -74,9 +74,9 @@
       {
       }
 
-  But it's OK if you don't.
+  But it is OK if you do not.
 
-- Don't write "foo ()", write "foo()".
+- Do not write "foo ()", write "foo()".
 
 - Please use streq() and strneq() instead of strcmp(), strncmp() where applicable.
 
   no speed benefit, and on calls like printf() "float"s get promoted
   to "double"s anyway, so there is no point.
 
-- Don't invoke functions when you allocate variables on the stack. Wrong:
+- Do not invoke functions when you allocate variables on the stack. Wrong:
 
   {
           int a = foobar();
   backwards!
 
 - Think about the types you use. If a value cannot sensibly be
-  negative, don't use "int", but use "unsigned".
+  negative, do not use "int", but use "unsigned".
 
-- Don't use types like "short". They *never* make sense. Use ints,
+- Do not use types like "short". They *never* make sense. Use ints,
   longs, long longs, all in unsigned+signed fashion, and the fixed
   size types uint32_t and so on, as well as size_t, but nothing else.
 
   users then for ourselves! Note that assert() and assert_return()
   really only should be used for detecting programming errors, not for
   runtime errors. assert() and assert_return() by usage of _likely_()
-  inform the compiler that he shouldn't expect these checks to fail,
+  inform the compiler that he should not expect these checks to fail,
   and they inform fellow programmers about the expected validity and
   range of parameters.