chiark / gitweb /
* update WNPP instructions, based on patch from Marcelo E. Magallon
authoraph <aph@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Sat, 4 Nov 2000 18:13:28 +0000 (18:13 +0000)
committeraph <aph@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Sat, 4 Nov 2000 18:13:28 +0000 (18:13 +0000)
    (closes: Bug#69435)
  * spelling corrections, awkward grammar suggestions from Andreas Krueger
    (closes: Bug#72810)

git-svn-id: svn://anonscm.debian.org/ddp/manuals/trunk/developers-reference@1031 313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d

developers-reference.sgml

index b08860f..7a19db8 100644 (file)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
   <!-- common, language independant entities -->
   <!entity % commondata  SYSTEM "common.ent" > %commondata;
   <!-- CVS revision of this document -->
-  <!entity cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.42 $">
+  <!entity cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.43 $">
 
   <!-- if you are translating this document, please notate the RCS
        revision of the developers reference here -->
@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ should read the manual for the software you are using, since it has
 much important information which is critical to its security.  Many
 more security failures are due to human error than to software failure
 or high-powered spy techniques.  See <ref id="key-maint"> for more
-information on maintianing your public key.
+information on maintaining your public key.
        <p>
 Debian uses the <prgn>GNU Privacy Guard</prgn> (package
 <package>gnupg</package> version 1 or better as its baseline standard.
@@ -271,7 +271,7 @@ There's a LDAP database containing many informations concerning all
 developers, you can access it at <url id="&url-debian-db;">. You can
 update your password (this password is propagated to most of the machines
 that are accessible to you), your adress, your country, the latitude and
-longitude from the point where you live, phone and fax numbers, your
+longitude of the point where you live, phone and fax numbers, your
 preferred shell, your IRC nickname, your web page and the email that
 you're using as alias for your debian.org email. Most of the information
 is not accessible to the public, for more details about this
@@ -299,7 +299,7 @@ the documentation for the <package>debian-keyring</package> package.
 
       <sect id="inform-vacation">Going On Vacation Gracefully
        <p>
-Most of the developers take vacation, usually this means that they can't
+Most developers take vacations, and usually this means that they can't
 work for Debian and they can't be reached by email if any problem occurs.
 The other developers need to know that you're on vacation so that they'll
 do whatever is needed when such a problem occurs. Usually this means that
@@ -308,7 +308,7 @@ critical bugs, security update, ...) occurs while you're on vacation.
        <p>
 In order to inform the other developers, there's two things that you should do.
 First send a mail to &email-debian-private; giving the period of time when
-you will be on vacation, you can also give some special instructions on what to
+you will be on vacation.  You can also give some special instructions on what to
 do if any problem occurs. Next you should update your information
 available in the Debian LDAP database and mark yourself as « on vacation »
 (this information is only accessible to debian developers). Don't forget
@@ -319,44 +319,51 @@ to remove the 
 A big part of your job as Debian maintainer will be to stay in contact
 with the upstream developers since you'll have to share information that
 you get from the Bug Tracking System. It's not your job to fix non-Debian
-specific bugs so you have to forward the bugs to the upstream developers
-(of course, if you are able to fix them, you can ...). This way the bug
-may be corrected when the next upstream version comes out. From time to
-time, you may get a patch attached to a bug report, you have to send the
+specific bugs.
+Rather, you have to forward these bugs to the upstream developers.
+(Of course, if you are able to do so, you may certainly fix them...)
+This way, the bug will hopefully
+be corrected when the next upstream version comes out.
+        <p>
+From time to
+time, you may get a patch attached to a bug report.  You have to send the
 patch upstream and make sure that it gets included (if the authors accept
 the proposed fix). If you need to modify the upstream sources in order to
 build a policy conformant package, then you should propose a nice fix 
-to the upstream developers which can be included so that you won't have to
+to the upstream developers which can be included there, so that you won't have to
 modify the sources of the next upstream version. Whatever changes you
 need, always try not to fork from the upstream sources.
 
       <sect id="rc-bugs">Managing Release Critical Bugs
         <p>
-Release Critical Bugs (RCB) are the bugs of severity «&nbsp;critical&nbsp;», 
-«&nbsp;grave&nbsp;» and «&nbsp;important&nbsp;». Those bugs can delay
-the Debian release and/or can justify the removal of a package at freeze
-time. That's why those bugs needs to be corrected as fast as possible.
-You must be aware that some developers who are part of the <url
-id="&url-debian-qa;" name="Debian Quality Assurance"> effort are following
-those bugs and try to help you each time they can. But if you can't
-fix such bugs within 2 weeks, you should either ask for help by sending a
-mail to the Quality Assurance (QA) group (&email-debian-qa;) or 
-justify yourself and gives your plan to fix it by sending a mail to the
-concerned bug report. Otherwise people from the QA group may want to do a
-Non Maintainer Upload (NMU) after trying to contact you (they might wait
-not as long as usually before they do their NMU if they have seen no
-recent activity from you on the BTS).
+Release Critical Bugs (RCB) are the bugs of severity
+«&nbsp;critical&nbsp;», «&nbsp;grave&nbsp;» and
+«&nbsp;important&nbsp;». Those bugs can delay the Debian release
+and/or can justify the removal of a package at freeze time. That's why
+those bugs needs to be corrected as fast as possible.  You must be
+aware that some developers who are part of the <url
+id="&url-debian-qa;" name="Debian Quality Assurance"> effort are
+following those bugs and try to help you each time they can. But if
+you can't fix such bugs within 2 weeks, you should either ask for help
+by sending a mail to the Quality Assurance (QA) group
+(&email-debian-qa;) or justify yourself and present your plan to fix
+it by sending a mail to the bug concerned report. Otherwise people
+from the QA group may want to do a Non Maintainer Upload (NMU) after
+trying to contact you (they might not wait as long as usual before
+they do their NMU if they have seen no recent activity from you on the
+BTS).
 
       <sect id="qa-effort">Quality Assurance Effort
        <p>
-Even if there is a dedicated group of people for Quality Assurance, QA is
-not reserved to them. You can participate to this effort by keeping your
-packages as bug free as possible, as lintian-clean (see <ref
-id="lintian-reports">) as possible. If you think that it's quite impossible,
-then you should consider orphaning (see <ref id="orphaning">) some of your
-packages so that you can do a good job with the other packages that you
-maintain. Alternatively you may ask the help of other people in order to
-catch up the backlog of bugs that you have (you can ask for help on
+Even though there is a dedicated group of people for Quality
+Assurance, QA duties are not reserved solely to them. You can
+participate in this effort by keeping your packages as bug free as
+possible, and as lintian-clean (see <ref id="lintian-reports">) as
+possible. If you think that it's quite impossible, then you should
+consider orphaning (see <ref id="orphaning">) some of your packages so
+that you can do a good job with the other packages that you
+maintain. Alternatively you may ask the help of other people in order
+to catch up the backlog of bugs that you have (you can ask for help on
 &email-debian-qa; or &email-debian-devel;).
 
       <sect>Retiring Gracefully
@@ -399,7 +406,12 @@ request to be copied.  Anyone who posts to a mailing list should read
 it to see the responses.
        <p>
 The following are the core Debian mailing lists: &email-debian-devel;,
-&email-debian-policy;, &email-debian-user;, &email-debian-private;,
+&email-debian-policy;, &email-debian-user;
+
+<!-- FIXME: &email-debian-user; results in same as does -->
+<!-- &email-debian-policy; - possibly an error in common.ent? -->
+
+, &email-debian-private;,
 &email-debian-announce;, and &email-debian-devel-announce;.  All
 developers are expected to be subscribed to at least
 &email-debian-private; and &email-debian-devel-announce;.  There are
@@ -433,7 +445,7 @@ Debian servers are well known servers which serve critical functions
 in the Debian project.  Every developer should know what these servers
 are and what they do.
        <p>
-If you have a problem with the operation of Debian server, and you
+If you have a problem with the operation of Debian server, and you
 think that the system operators need to be notified of this problem,
 please find the contact address for the particular machine at <url
 id="&url-devel-machines;">.  If you have a non-operating problems
@@ -478,7 +490,7 @@ The main web server, <tt>www.debian.org</tt>, is also known as
 machine.
        <p>
 If you have some Debian-specific information which you want to serve
-up on the web, you can do do this by putting material in the
+up on the web, you can do this by putting material in the
 <file>public_html</file> directory under your home directory.  You can
 do this on <tt>va.debian.org</tt>. Any material you put in those areas
 are accessible via the URL
@@ -498,7 +510,7 @@ else has already reported the problem on the
       <sect1 id="servers-cvs">The CVS server
        <p>
 <tt>cvs.debian.org</tt> is also known as <tt>va.debian.org</tt>,
-discussed above.  If you need the use of a publically accessible CVS
+discussed above.  If you need to use a publically accessible CVS
 server, for instance, to help coordinate work on a package between
 many different developers, you can request a CVS area on the server.
          <p>
@@ -595,7 +607,7 @@ id="&url-debian-policy;" name="Debian Policy Manual">.  The DFSG is
 our definition of ``free software.'' Check out the Debian Policy
 Manual for details.
        <p>
-The packages which do not apply to the DFSG are placed in the
+Packages which do not apply to the DFSG are placed in the
 <em>non-free</em> section. These packages are not considered as part
 of the Debian distribution, though we support their use, and we
 provide infrastructure (such as our bug-tracking system and mailing
@@ -618,7 +630,7 @@ commercial distribution, for example.
        <p>
 On the other hand, a CD-ROM vendor could easily check the individual
 package licenses of the packages in <em>non-free</em> and include as
-many on the CD-ROMs as he's allowed. (Since this varies greatly from
+many on the CD-ROMs as he's allowed to. (Since this varies greatly from
 vendor to vendor, this job can't be done by the Debian developers.)
 
 
@@ -655,8 +667,8 @@ pages">.
 The sections <em>main</em>, <em>contrib</em>, and <em>non-free</em>
 are split into <em>subsections</em> to simplify the installation
 process and the maintainance of the archive.  Subsections are not
-formally defined, excepting perhaps the `base' subsection.
-Subsections exist simply to simplify the organization and browsing of
+formally defined, except perhaps the `base' subsection.
+Subsections simply exist to simplify the organization and browsing of
 available packages.  Please check the current Debian distribution to
 see which sections are available.
 
@@ -686,8 +698,8 @@ the package (maintainer, version, etc.).
 
       <sect>Distribution directories
        <p>
-The directory system described in the previous chapter, are themselves
-contained within <em>distribution directories</em>.  Every
+The directory system described in the previous chapter is itself
+contained within <em>distribution directories</em>.  Each
 distribution is contained in the <tt>dists</tt> directory in the
 top-level of the Debian archive itself (the symlinks from the
 top-level directory to the distributions themselves are for backwards
@@ -725,8 +737,8 @@ distribution change from day-to-day. Since no special effort is done
 to test this distribution, it is sometimes ``unstable.''
        <p>
 After a period of development, the <em>unstable</em> distribution is
-copied in a new distribution directory, called <em>frozen</em>. When
-that occurs, no changes are allowed to the frozen distribution except
+copied to a new distribution directory, called <em>frozen</em>.  After
+that has been done, no changes are allowed to the frozen distribution except
 bug fixes; that's why it's called ``frozen.''  After another month or
 a little longer, the <em>frozen</em> distribution is renamed to
 <em>stable</em>, overriding the old <em>stable</em> distribution,
@@ -745,7 +757,7 @@ muster are periodically moved as a batch into the stable distribution
 and the revision level of the stable distribution is incremented
 (e.g., `1.3' becomes `1.3r1', `2.0r2' becomes `2.0r3', and so forth).
        <p>
-Note that development under <em>unstable</em> is continued during the
+Note that development under <em>unstable</em> continues during the
 ``freeze'' period, since a new <em>unstable</em> distribution is be
 created when the older <em>unstable</em> is moved to <em>frozen</em>.
 Another wrinkle is that when the <em>frozen</em> distribution is
@@ -754,14 +766,14 @@ from the Debian archives (although they do live on at
 <tt>archive-host;</tt>).
        <p>
 In summary, there is always a <em>stable</em> and an <em>unstable</em>
-distribution available, and the <em>frozen</em> distribution shows up
+distribution available, and a <em>frozen</em> distribution shows up
 for a month or so from time to time.
 
 
        <sect1>Experimental
          <p>
 The <em>experimental</em> distribution is a specialty distribution.
-It is not a full distribution in the same sense that `stable' and
+It is not a full distribution in the same sense as `stable' and
 `unstable' are.  Instead, it is meant to be a temporary staging area
 for highly experimental software where there's a good chance that the
 software could break your system.  Users who download and install
@@ -771,7 +783,7 @@ distribution.
          <p>
 Developers should be very selective in the use of the
 <em>experimental</em> distribution.  Even if a package is highly
-unstable, it could well still go into <em>unstable</em>; just state a
+unstable, it could still go into <em>unstable</em>; just state a
 few warnings in the description.  However, if there is a chance that
 the software could do grave damage to a system, it might be better to
 put it into <em>experimental</em>.
@@ -789,7 +801,7 @@ However, using <em>experimental</em> as a personal staging area is not
 always the best idea.  You can't replace or upgrade the files in there
 on your own (<prgn>dinstall</prgn> and the Debian archive maintainers
 do that).  Additionally, you'll have to remember to ask the archive
-maintainers to delete the package one you have uploaded it to
+maintainers to delete the package once you have uploaded it to
 <em>unstable</em>.  Using your personal web space on
 <tt>va.debian.org</tt> is generally a better idea, so that you put
 less strain on the Debian archive maintainers.
@@ -800,19 +812,19 @@ less strain on the Debian archive maintainers.
 Every released Debian distribution has a <em>code name</em>: Debian
 1.1 is called `buzz'; Debian 1.2, `rex'; Debian 1.3, `bo'; Debian 2.0,
 `hamm'; Debian 2.1, `slink'; and Debian 2.2, `potato'.  There is also
-a ``pseudo-distribution'', called `sid' which is contains packages for
+a ``pseudo-distribution'', called `sid', which is contains packages for
 architectures which are not yet officially supported or released by
 Debian.  These architectures are planned to be integrated into the
 mainstream distribution at some future date.
        <p>
-Since the Debian has an open development model (i.e., everyone can
+Since Debian has an open development model (i.e., everyone can
 participate and follow the development) even the unstable distribution
-is distributed via the Internet on the Debian FTP and HTTP server
+is distributed to the Internet through the Debian FTP and HTTP server
 network. Thus, if we had called the directory which contains the
 development version `unstable', then we would have to rename it to
 `stable' when the version is released, which would cause all FTP
-mirrors to re-retrieve the whole distribution (which is already very
-large!).
+mirrors to re-retrieve the whole distribution (which is quite
+large).
        <p>
 On the other hand, if we called the distribution directories
 <em>Debian-x.y</em> from the beginning, people would think that Debian
@@ -824,9 +836,9 @@ version. That's the reason why the first official Debian release was
 Thus, the names of the distribution directories in the archive are
 determined by their code names and not their release status (i.e.,
 `slink').  These names stay the same during the development period and
-after the release; symbolic links, which can be changed, are made to
+after the release; symbolic links, which can be changed easily,
 indicate the currently released stable distribution.  That's why the
-real distribution directories use the <em>code names</em> and symbolic
+real distribution directories use the <em>code names</em>, while symbolic
 links for <em>stable</em>, <em>unstable</em>, and <em>frozen</em>
 point to the appropriate release directories.
 
@@ -841,30 +853,46 @@ Prospective Packages (WNPP)"> list. Checking the WNPP list ensures that
 no one is already working on packaging that software, and that effort is
 not duplicated. Read the <url id="&url-wnpp;" name="WNPP web pages"> for
 more information.
+        <p>
+Assuming no one else is already working on your prospective package,
+you must then submit a short bug (<ref id="submit-bug">) against the
+pseudo package <tt>wnpp</tt> and send a copy to &email-debian-devel;
+describing your plan to create a new package, including, but not
+limiting yourself to, a description of the package, the license of the
+prospective package and the current URL where it can be downloaded
+from.  You should set the subject of the bug to ``ITP: <var>foo</var>
+-- <var>short description</var>'', substituting the name of the new
+package for <var>foo</var>.  The severity of the bug report must be
+set to <em>normal</em>.  Please include a <tt>Closes:
+bug#<var>nnnnn</var></tt> entry on the changelog of the new package in
+order for the bug report to be automatically closed once the new
+package is installed on the archive (<ref id="upload-bugfix">).
        <p>
 There are a number of reasons why we ask maintainers to announce their
 intentions:
          <list compact>
            <item>
 It helps the (potentially new) maintainer to tap into the experience
-of people on the list, and lets them know if any one else is working
+of people on the list, and lets them know if anyone else is working
 on it already.
            <item>
 It lets other people thinking about working on the package know that
-there already is a volunteer, and efforts may be shared.
+there already is a volunteer, so efforts may be shared.
            <item>
 It lets the rest of the maintainers know more about the package than
 the one line description and the usual changelog entry ``Initial release''
 that gets posted to <tt>debian-devel-changes</tt>.
            <item>
 It is helpful to the people who live off unstable (and form our first
-line of testers); we should encourage these people.
+line of testers).  We should encourage these people.
            <item>
 The announcements give maintainers and other interested parties a
 better feel of what is going on, and what is new, in the project.
          </list>
 
 
+
+
       <sect id="uploading">Uploading a package
 
        <sect1>Generating the changes file
@@ -912,23 +940,23 @@ want to explain them why you uploaded your package to stable by sending
 them a short explication.
          <p>
 The first time a version is uploaded which corresponds to a particular
-upstream version the original source tar file should be uploaded and
-included in the <tt>.changes</tt> file; subsequent times the very same
+upstream version, the original source tar file should be uploaded and
+included in the <tt>.changes</tt> file.  Subsequently, this very same
 tar file should be used to build the new diffs and <tt>.dsc</tt>
-files, and it need not then be uploaded.
+files, and will not need to be re-uploaded.
          <p>
-By default <prgn>dpkg-genchanges</prgn> and
+By default, <prgn>dpkg-genchanges</prgn> and
 <prgn>dpkg-buildpackage</prgn> will include the original source tar
 file if and only if the Debian revision part of the source version
 number is 0 or 1, indicating a new upstream version.  This behaviour
 may be modified by using <tt>-sa</tt> to always include it or
 <tt>-sd</tt> to always leave it out.
          <p>
-If no original source is included in the upload then the original
+If no original source is included in the upload, the original
 source tar-file used by <prgn>dpkg-source</prgn> when constructing the
 <tt>.dsc</tt> file and diff to be uploaded <em>must</em> be
 byte-for-byte identical with the one already in the archive.  If there
-is some reason why this is not the case then the new version of the
+is some reason why this is not the case, the new version of the
 original source should be uploaded, possibly by using the <tt>-sa</tt>
 flag.
 
@@ -965,19 +993,20 @@ documentation bug fixes are allowed, since good documentation is
 important
              </list>
            <p>
-Remember, there is statistically a 15% chance that every bug fix will
-introduce a new bug.  The introduction and discovery of new bugs
-either delays release or weakens the final product.  There is little
-correlation between the severity of the original bug and the severity
-of the introduced bug.
+Experience has shown that there is statistically a 15% chance that
+every bug fix will introduce a new bug.  The introduction and
+discovery of new bugs either delays release or weakens the final
+product.  There is little correlation between the severity of the
+original bug fixed and the severity of the bug newly introduced by the
+fix.
 
 
 
        <sect1 id="upload-checking">Checking the package prior to upload
          <p>
-Before you upload your package, you should do basic testing on it.
-Make sure you try the following activities (you'll need to have an
-older version of the Debian package around).
+Before you upload your package, you should do basic testing on it.  At
+a minimum, you should try the following activities (you'll need to
+have an older version of the same Debian package around):
 <list>
               <item>
 Install the package and make sure the software works, or upgrade the
@@ -1013,9 +1042,9 @@ to transfer the files, place them into <ftppath>&us-upload-dir;</ftppath>;
 if you use anonymous FTP to upload, place them into
 <ftppath>/pub/UploadQueue/</ftppath>.
           <p>
-<em>Note:</em> Do not upload packages containing software that is
-export-controlled by the United States government to <tt>ftp-master</tt>,
-nor to the overseas upload queues on <tt>chiark</tt> or
+<em>Note:</em> Do not upload to <tt>ftp-master</tt> packages
+containing software that is export-controlled by the United States
+government, nor to the overseas upload queues on <tt>chiark</tt> or
 <tt>erlangen</tt>.  This prohibition covers almost all cryptographic
 software, and even sometimes software that contains ``hooks'' to
 cryptographic software, such as electronic mail readers that support
@@ -1080,14 +1109,14 @@ The upload must be a complete Debian upload, as you would put it into
 along with the other files mentioned in the <tt>.changes</tt>. The
 queue daemon also checks that the <tt>.changes</tt> is correctly
 PGP-signed by a Debian developer, so that no bogus files can find
-their way to <tt>ftp-master</tt> via the queue. Please also make sure that
+their way to <tt>ftp-master</tt> via this queue. Please also make sure that
 the <tt>Maintainer</tt> field in the <tt>.changes</tt> contains
 <em>your</em> e-mail address. The address found there is used for all
 replies, just as on <tt>ftp-master</tt>.
          <p>
 There's no need to move your files into a second directory after the
-upload as on <tt>chiark</tt>. And, in any case, you should get some
-mail reply from the queue daemon what happened to your
+upload, as on <tt>chiark</tt>. And, in any case, you should get a
+mail reply from the queue daemon explaining what happened to your
 upload. Hopefully it should have been moved to <tt>ftp-master</tt>, but in
 case of errors you're notified, too.
          <p>
@@ -1115,15 +1144,16 @@ anonymous FTP to <url id="&url-upload-jp;">.
 
       <sect id="upload-announce">Announcing package uploads
        <p>
-When a package is uploaded an announcement should be posted to one of
-the ``debian-changes'' lists. This is now done automatically by dinstall
-when it runs (usually once a day), you just need to use a recent
-<package>dpkg-dev</package> (&gt;= 1.4.1.2). Before that, 
-<prgn>dupload</prgn> was used to send those announcements, please make
-sure that you configured your <prgn>dupload</prgn> to no more send those
-announcements (check its documentation and look for dinstall_runs). The
-mail generated by dinstall will contain the PGP/GPG signed .changes files
-that you uploaded with your package.
+When a package is uploaded, an announcement should be posted to one of
+the ``debian-changes'' lists. This is now done automatically by
+<tt>dinstall</tt> when it runs (usually once a day).  You just need to
+use a recent <package>dpkg-dev</package> (&gt;= 1.4.1.2). The mail
+generated by <tt>dinstall</tt> will contain the PGP/GPG signed
+<tt>.changes</tt> files that you uploaded with your package.
+Previously, <prgn>dupload</prgn> used to send those announcements, so
+please make sure that you configured your <prgn>dupload</prgn> not to
+send those announcements (check its documentation and look for
+``dinstall_runs'').
        <p>
 If a package is released with the <tt>Distribution:</tt> set to
 `stable', the announcement is sent to &email-debian-changes;.  If a
@@ -1137,7 +1167,7 @@ putting both distributions in the <tt>Distribution:</tt> line.  In
 such a case the upload announcement will go to both of the above
 mailing lists.
        <p>
-The <prgn>dupload</prgn> program is clever enough to determine for itself
+The <prgn>dupload</prgn> program is clever enough to determine
 where the announcement should go, and will automatically mail the
 announcement to the right list.  See <ref id="dupload">.
 
@@ -1151,11 +1181,11 @@ daily basis by an archive maintenance tool called
 the `unstable' distribution are handled automatically. In other cases,
 notably new packages, placing the uploaded package into the
 distribution is handled manually. When uploads are handled manually,
-the change to the archive may take up to a week to occur (please be
-patient).
+the change to the archive may take up to a week to occur.  Please be
+patient.
        <p>
-In any case, you will receive notification indicating that the package
-has been uploaded via email.  Please examine this notification
+In any case, you will receive email notification indicating that the
+package has been uploaded.  Please examine this notification
 carefully.  You may notice that the package didn't go into the section
 you thought you set it to go into.  Read on for why.
 
@@ -1208,7 +1238,7 @@ similar, since they involve an upload of a package by a developer who
 is not the official maintainer of that package.  That is why it's a
 <em>non-maintainer</em> upload.
        <p>
-A source NMU is a upload of a package by a developer who is not the
+A source NMU is an upload of a package by a developer who is not the
 official maintainer, for the purposes of fixing a bug in the package.
 Source NMUs always involves changes to the source (even if it is just
 a change to <file>debian/changelog</file>).  This can be either a change
@@ -1216,7 +1246,7 @@ to the upstream source, or a change to the Debian bits of the source.
        <p>
 A binary NMU is a recompilation and upload of a binary package for a
 new architecture.  As such, it is usually part of a porting effort.  A
-binary NMU is non-maintainer uploaded binary version of a package
+binary NMU is non-maintainer uploaded binary version of a package
 (often for another architecture), with no source changes required.
 There are many cases where porters must fix problems in the source in
 order to get them to compile for their target architecture; that would
@@ -1250,7 +1280,7 @@ slightly different rules than non-porters, due to their unique
 circumstances (see <ref id="source-nmu-when-porter">).
        <p>
 Only critical changes or security bug fixes make it into stable.  When
-a security bug is detected a fixed package should be uploaded as soon
+a security bug is detected, a fixed package should be uploaded as soon
 as possible. In this case, the Debian Security Managers should get in
 contact with the package maintainer to make sure a fixed package is
 uploaded within a reasonable time (less than 48 hours). If the package
@@ -1425,7 +1455,7 @@ fact, all the prescriptions from <ref id="upload"> apply, including
 the need to announce the NMU to the proper lists.
          <p>
 Make sure you do <em>not</em> change the value of the maintainer in
-the <file>debian/control</file> file.  Your name from the NMU entry of
+the <file>debian/control</file> file.  Your name as given in the NMU entry of
 the <file>debian/changelog</file> file will be used for signing the
 changes file.
 
@@ -1440,19 +1470,19 @@ is part of your duty as a maintainer to be aware of issues of
 portability.  Therefore, even if you are not a porter, you should read
 most of this chapter.
       <p>
-Porting is the act of building Debian packages for architectures which
+Porting is the act of building Debian packages for architectures that
 is different from the original architecture of the package
 maintainer's binary package.  It is a unique and essential activity.
 In fact, porters do most of the actual compiling of Debian packages.
-For instance, for one <em>i386</em> binary package, there has to be a
-recompile for each architecture, which is around five more builds.
+For instance, for a single <em>i386</em> binary package, there must be a
+recompile for each architecture, which is amounts to five more builds.
 
 
       <sect id="kind-to-porters">Being Kind to Porters
        <p>
 Porters have a difficult and unique task, since they are required to
 deal with a large volume of packages.  Ideally, every source package
-should build right out of the box; unfortunately, this is often not
+should build right out of the box.  Unfortunately, this is often not
 the case.  This section contains a checklist of ``gotchas'' often
 committed by Debian maintainers -- common problems which often stymie
 porters, and make their jobs unnecessarily more difficult.
@@ -1491,7 +1521,7 @@ or programs.  For instance, you should never be calling programs in
 be setup in a special way.  Try building your package on another
 machine, even if it's the same architecture.
            <item>
-Don't depend on the package your building already being installed (a
+Don't depend on the package you're building already being installed (a
 sub-case of the above issue).
            <item>
 Don't rely on <prgn>egcc</prgn> being available; don't rely on
@@ -1651,7 +1681,7 @@ cases.
 
       <sect>Moving packages
        <p>
-Sometimes a package will change either its section.  For instance, a
+Sometimes a package will change its section.  For instance, a
 package from the `non-free' section might be GPL'd in a later version,
 in which case, the package should be moved to `main' or
 `contrib'.<footnote> See the <url id="&url-debian-policy;"
@@ -1712,9 +1742,20 @@ obsolete name.
       <sect id="orphaning">Orphaning a package
        <p>
 If you can no longer maintain a package, you need to inform the others
-about that, and see that the package is marked as orphaned. Read
-instructions on the <url id="&url-wnpp;" name="WNPP web pages"> for more
-information.
+about that, and see that the package is marked as orphaned.
+you should set the package maintainer to <tt>Debian QA Group
+&lt;debian-qa@lists.debian.org&gt;</tt> and submit a bug report
+against the pseudo package <tt>wnpp</tt>.  The bug report should be
+titled <tt>O: <var>package</var> -- <var>short description</var></tt>
+indicating that the package is now orphaned.  The severity of the bug
+should be set to <em>normal</em>.  If the package is especially
+crucial to Debian, you should instead submit a bug against
+<tt>wnpp</tt> and title it <tt>RFA: <var>package</var> -- <var>short
+description</var></tt> and set its severity to <em>important</em>. You
+should also email &email-debian-devel; asking for a new maintainer.
+       <p>
+Read instructions on the <url id="&url-wnpp;" name="WNPP web pages">
+for more information.
 
       <sect id="adopting">Adopting a package
        <p>
@@ -1722,7 +1763,7 @@ A list of packages in need of a new maintainer is available at in the
 <url name="Work-Needing and Prospective Packages list (WNPP)"
 id="&url-wnpp;">. If you wish to take over maintenance of any of the
 packages listed in the WNPP, please take a look at the aforementioned
-page for more information.
+page for information and procedures.
        <p>
 It is not OK to simply take over a package that you feel is neglected
 -- that would be package hijacking.  You can, of course, contact the
@@ -1782,7 +1823,7 @@ good job reporting a bug and redirecting it to the proper location.
 For extra credit, you can go through other packages, merging bugs
 which are reported more than once, or setting bug severities to
 `fixed' when they have already been fixed.  Note that when you are
-neither the bug submitter nor the package maintainer, you are should
+neither the bug submitter nor the package maintainer, you should
 not actually close the bug (unless you secure permission from the
 maintainer).
 
@@ -1952,7 +1993,7 @@ yet as robust as other systems.
        <p>
 <package>equivs</package> is another package for making packages.  It
 is often suggested for local use if you need to make a package simply
-to fulfill dependancies.  It is also sometimes used when making
+to fulfill dependencies.  It is also sometimes used when making
 ``meta-packages'', which are packages whose only purpose is to depend
 on other packages.