chiark / gitweb /
another update WRT sid/unstable/testing, from Colin Watson
authorjoy <joy@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Sat, 30 Dec 2000 16:07:46 +0000 (16:07 +0000)
committerjoy <joy@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Sat, 30 Dec 2000 16:07:46 +0000 (16:07 +0000)
git-svn-id: svn://anonscm.debian.org/ddp/manuals/trunk/developers-reference@1078 313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d

developers-reference.sgml

index 3cc79e0..5ecbb3f 100644 (file)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
   <!-- common, language independant entities -->
   <!entity % commondata  SYSTEM "common.ent" > %commondata;
   <!-- CVS revision of this document -->
-  <!entity cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.47 $">
+  <!entity cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.48 $">
 
   <!-- if you are translating this document, please notate the RCS
        revision of the developers reference here -->
@@ -831,19 +831,21 @@ less strain on the Debian archive maintainers.
 Every released Debian distribution has a <em>code name</em>: Debian
 1.1 is called `buzz'; Debian 1.2, `rex'; Debian 1.3, `bo'; Debian 2.0,
 `hamm'; Debian 2.1, `slink'; and Debian 2.2, `potato'.  There is also
-a ``pseudo-distribution'', called `sid', which is contains packages for
-architectures which are not yet officially supported or released by
-Debian.  These architectures are planned to be integrated into the
-mainstream distribution at some future date.
+a ``pseudo-distribution'', called `sid', which is the current
+`unstable' distribution; since packages are moved from `unstable' to
+`testing' as they approach stability, `sid' itself is never released.
+As well as the usual contents of a Debian distribution, `sid' contains
+packages for architectures which are not yet officially supported or
+released by Debian.  These architectures are planned to be integrated
+into the mainstream distribution at some future date.
        <p>
 Since Debian has an open development model (i.e., everyone can
-participate and follow the development) even the unstable distribution
-is distributed to the Internet through the Debian FTP and HTTP server
-network. Thus, if we had called the directory which contains the
-development version `unstable', then we would have to rename it to
-`stable' when the version is released, which would cause all FTP
-mirrors to re-retrieve the whole distribution (which is quite
-large).
+participate and follow the development) even the `unstable' and `testing'
+distributions are distributed to the Internet through the Debian FTP and
+HTTP server network. Thus, if we had called the directory which contains
+the release candidate version `testing', then we would have to rename it
+to `stable' when the version is released, which would cause all FTP
+mirrors to re-retrieve the whole distribution (which is quite large).
        <p>
 On the other hand, if we called the distribution directories
 <em>Debian-x.y</em> from the beginning, people would think that Debian