chiark / gitweb /
Fix instructions for new maintainers, incorporating the actual text
authoraph <aph@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Mon, 28 Sep 1998 02:39:19 +0000 (02:39 +0000)
committeraph <aph@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Mon, 28 Sep 1998 02:39:19 +0000 (02:39 +0000)
sent to prospective new maintainers.  Improve this text a bit for
readability, coverage, and organization.  Significant changes were
patched back to the new-maintainers group, if they care to use
them. (closes Bug#26948)

Add an introductory "Scope" section which helps delineate what should
and should not be included in this Reference.

Add discussion of the "experimental" distribution, culled from an
email from Guy Maor on debian-devel.

Point to doc-debian's mailing list instructions where relevant.

Made references to online documentation into URLs where possible.

Little corrections here and there.

git-svn-id: svn://anonscm.debian.org/ddp/manuals/trunk/developers-reference@655 313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d

developers-reference.sgml

index fc42aff..eeb6a26 100644 (file)
@@ -7,9 +7,8 @@
 <!--
 
  Topics to be included:
-  - add an intro/scope section
   - bugs in upstream versions should be reported upstream!
-  - pointer for useful tools for maintainers
+  - fill in ftp and www server discussion
 
  -->
 
@@ -44,117 +43,180 @@ writing to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite
 
     <toc sect>
 
-    <chapt>Applying to Become a Maintainer
+    <chapt id="scope">Scope of This Document
+      <p>
+The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the
+processes and resources used by Debian developers.
+      <p>
+The processes discussed within include how to become a maintainer
+(<ref id="new-maintainer">); how to upload new packages (<ref
+id="upload">); how and when to do interim releases of other
+maintainer's packages (<ref id="nmu">); how to move, remove, or orphan
+packages (<ref id="archive-manip">); and how to handle bug reports
+(<ref id="bug-handling">).
+      <p>
+The resources discussed in this reference include the mailing lists
+and servers (<ref id="servers">); a discussion of the structure of the
+Debian archive (<ref id="archive">); explanation of the different
+servers which accept package uploads (<ref id="upload-master">); and a
+discussion of resources which an help maintainers with the quality of
+their packages (<ref id="tools">).
+      <p>
+It should be clear that this reference does not discuss the details of
+the Debian package or how to generate Debian packages; that is
+discussed in the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/doc/packaging-manuals/packaging.html/"
+name="Debian Packaging Manual">.  Nor is this reference intended to
+give details on standards for how Debian software must behave, which
+is documented in the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/" name="Debian Policy
+Manual">.
+
+
+    <chapt id="new-maintainer">Applying to Become a Maintainer
        
       <sect>Getting started
        <p>
 So, you've read all the documentation, you understand what everything
 in the <prgn/hello/ example package is for, and you're about to
-Debianise your favourite package.  How do you actually become a Debian
-developer so that your work can be incorporated into the Project?
+Debianise your favourite piece of software.  How do you actually
+become a Debian developer so that your work can be incorporated into
+the Project?
        <p>
 Firstly, subscribe to <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ if you
 haven't already.  Send the word <tt/subscribe/ in the <em/Subject/ of
 a mail to <email/debian-devel-REQUEST@lists.debian.org/.  In case of
 problems contact the list administrator at
-<email/listmaster@lists.debian.org/.
+<email/listmaster@lists.debian.org/.  More information on available
+mailing lists can be found in <ref id="mailing-lists">.
        <p>
 You should subscribe and lurk for a bit before doing any coding, and
 you should post about your intentions to work on something to avoid
 duplicated effort.
        <p>
-If you do not have a PGP key yet, generate one.  You should probably
-read the PGP manual, since it has much important information which is
-critical to its security.  Many more security failures are due to
-human error than to software failure or high-powered spy techniques.
-       <p>
-Due to export restrictions by the United States government some Debian
-packages, including PGP, have been moved to an ftp site outside of the
-United States. You can find the current locations of those packages on
-<ftpsite/ftp.debian.org/ or <ftpsite/ftp.us.debian.org/ in the
-<ftppath>/pub/debian/README.non-US</ftppath> file.
-       <p>
-If you live in a country where use of cryptography even for
-authentication is forbidden then please contact us so we can make
-special arrangements.  This does not apply in France, where I believe
-only encryption and not authentication is forbidden.
+Another good list to subscribe to is
+<email/debian-mentors@lists.debian.org/.  See <ref id="mentors"> for
+details.  The IRC channel <tt/#debian/ on the Linux People IRC network 
+(i.e., <tt/irc.debian.org/) can also be helpful.
 
 
       <sect>Registering as a Debian developer
        <p>
 Before you decide to work in the Debian Project you have to read the
 <url id="http://www.debian.org/social_contract" name="Debian Social
-Contract">.
+Contract">.  Registering as a developer means that you agree with and
+pledge to uphold the Debian Social Contract; it is very important that
+maintainers are in accord with the essential ideas behind Debian
+GNU/Linux.  Reading the <url
+id="http://www.gnu.org/gnu/manifesto.html" name="GNU Manifesto"> would
+also be a good idea.
+       <p>
+The process of registering as a developer is a process of verifying
+your identity and intentions.  As the number of people working on
+Debian GNU/Linux has grown to over 400 people and our systems are used
+in several very important places we have to be careful about being
+compromised.  Therefore, we need to verify new maintainers before we
+can give them accounts on our servers and letting them upload
+packages.
        <p>
-After that, you should send a message to
-<email/new-maintainer@debian.org/ to register as an 'offical' Debian
-developer so that you will be able to upload your packages.
-       <p>
-The message should say what you've done and who you are, and should
-ask for an account on <tt/master/ and to be subscribed to
-<email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/ (the developers-only mailing
-list). It should contain your PGP or RSA public key (extracted using
-<tt>pgp -kxa</tt> in the case of PGP; note that <tt/gpg/ integration
-is underway) for the database of keys which is distributed on the FTP
-server (<url
-id="ftp://ftp.debian.org/pub/debian/doc/debian-keyring.tar.gz">, or
-the <prgn>debian-keyring</prgn>> package).  Please be sure to sign
-your request message with your chosen PGP or RSA key. In addition, you
-have to mention that you've read the ``Debian Social Contract'' (see
-above) and you are expected to know where to find the ``Debian Policy
-Manual'' and the ``Debian Packaging Manual.''
-       <p>
-Please be sure to include your preferred login name on <tt/master/
-(seven characters or less), as well as the email address at which
-you'd prefer to be subscribed to
+Registration requires that the following information be sent to
+<email/new-maintainer@debian.org/ as part of the registration
+application:
+<list>
+           <item>
+Your name.
+           <item>
+Your preferred login name on <tt/master/ (seven characters or
+less<footnote>Can anyone clarify for me why logins on <tt>master</tt>
+cannot be eight characters?</footnote> ), as well as the email address
+at which you'd prefer to be subscribed to
 <email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/ (typically this will be either
 your primary mail address or your new <tt>debian.org</tt> address).
-       <p>
-You should also include some mechanism by which we can verify your
-real-life identity.  For example, any of the following mechanisms
-would suffice:
-         <list compact>
            <item>
-A PGP or RSA key signed by any well-known signature, such as any
-current Debian developer.
+A phone number where we can call you.
            <item>
-A scanned (or physically mailed) copy of any formal documents
-certifying your identity (such as a birth certificate, national ID
-card, U.S. Driver's License, etc.).  Please sign the image with your
-PGP or RSA key.
-         </list>
-         
-The following mechanisms are discouraged, but are acceptable if
-neither of the first two mechanisms is practical:
-         <list compact>
+A statement of intention, that is, what package(s) you intend to work
+on, which Debian port you will be assisting, or how you intend to
+contribute to Debian.
            <item>
-A pointer to a phone listing at which you could be reached (at our
-expense).  This phone listing should be verifiable independently
-through external means such as a national directory-listing service or
-other authoritative source.
+A statement that you have read and agree to uphold the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/social_contract" name="Debian Social
+Contract">.
            <item>
-Any other mechanism by which you can establish your real-life identity
-with reasonable certainty.
+Some mechanism by which we can verify your real-life identity. For
+example, any of the following mechanisms would suffice:
+<list>
+                 <item>
+A PGP key signed by any well-known signature, such as:
+<list>
+                 <item>
+Any current Debian developer you have met <em/in real life/.
+                 <item>
+Any formal certification service (such as Verisign, etc.) that
+verifies your identity.  A certification that verifies your email
+address, and not you identity, is not sufficient.
+                     </list>
+                 <item>
+Alternatively, you may identify yourself with a scanned (or physically
+mailed) copy of any formal documents certifying your identity (such as
+a birth certificate, national ID card, U.S. Driver's License, etc.).
+If emailed, please sign the mail with your PGP key.
+               </list>
          </list>
-         
-We're sorry about the inconvenience of requiring proof of identity,
-but for the moment, such measures are unfortunately the only way we
-can ensure the security and reliability of our distribution.
+If you do not have a PGP key yet, generate one. Every developer needs
+a PGP key in order to sign and verify package uploads. You should read
+the PGP manual, since it has much important information which is
+critical to its security.  Many more security failures are due to
+human error than to software failure or high-powered spy techniques.
+       <p>
+Your PGP key must be at least 1024 bits long.  There is no reason to
+use a smaller key, and doing so would be much less secure.  Your key
+must be signed with at least your own user ID.  This prevents user ID
+tampering.  You can do it by executing `<tt>pgp -ks
+<var/your_userid/</tt>'.
+       <p>
+If your PGP key isn't on public PGP key servers such as
+<tt>pgp.net</tt>, please read the documentation available locally
+<tt>/usr/doc/pgp/keyserv.doc</tt>.  That document contains
+instructions on how to put your key on the public keyservers.
+       <p>
+Due to export restrictions by the United States government some Debian
+packages, including PGP, have been moved to an ftp site outside of the
+United States. You can find the current locations of those packages on
+<ftpsite/ftp.debian.org/ or <ftpsite/ftp.us.debian.org/ in the
+<ftppath>/pub/debian/README.non-US</ftppath> file.
+       <p>
+If you live in a country where use of cryptography even for
+authentication is forbidden then please contact us so we can make
+special arrangements.  This does not apply in France, where I believe
+only encryption and not authentication is forbidden.
+       <p>
+Once you have all your information ready, and your public key is
+available on public key servers, send a message to
+<email/new-maintainer@debian.org/ to register as an offical Debian
+developer so that you will be able to upload your packages.  This
+message must all the information discussed above.  The message must
+also contain your PGP or RSA public key (extracted using <tt>pgp
+-kxa</tt> in the case of PGP; note that <tt/gpg/ integration is
+underway) for the database of keys which is distributed from
+<ftpsite/ftp.debian.org/ in
+<ftppath>/pub/debian/doc/debian-keyring.tar.gz</ftppath>, or the
+<prgn>debian-keyring</prgn> package).  Please be sure to sign your
+request message with your chosen PGP or RSA key.
        <p>
 Once this information is received and processed, you should be
 contacted with information about your new Debian maintainer account.
-If you don't hear anything within 7-10 days, please re-send your
+If you don't hear anything within 7-14 days, please re-send your
 original message--the new-maintainer volunteers are typically
 overworked, and mistakes do occasionally happen.
 
 
-      <sect>Debian Mentors
+      <sect id="mentors">Debian Mentors
        <p>
 There is a mailing list called <email/debian-mentors@lists.debian.org/
 which has been set up for newbie maintainers who seek help with
-initial packaging and other developer-related issues.
-       <p>
-Every new developer is invited to subscribe to that list (see <ref
+initial packaging and other developer-related issues.  Every new
+developer is invited to subscribe to that list (see <ref
 id="mailing-lists"> for details).
        <p>
 Those who prefer one-on-one help (e.g., via private emails) should
@@ -162,15 +224,20 @@ also post to that list and an experienced developer will volunteer to
 help.
 
 
-    <chapt>Internet Servers
+    <chapt id="servers">Mailing Lists and Servers
 
       <sect id="mailing-lists">Mailing lists
        <p>
 The mailing list server is at <tt/lists.debian.org/.  Mail
 <tt/debian-<var/foo/-REQUEST@lists.debian.org/, where
 <tt/debian-<var/foo// is the name of the list, with the word
-<tt/subscribe/ in the Subject to subscribe or <tt/unsubscribe/ to
-unsubscribe.
+<tt/subscribe/ in the <em/Subject/ to subscribe or <tt/unsubscribe/ to
+unsubscribe.  More detailed instructions on how to subscribe and
+unsubscribe to the mailing lists can be found at <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe">, <url
+id="ftp://ftp.debian.org/debian/doc/mailing-lists.txt"> or locally in
+<tt>/usr/doc/debian/mailing-lists.txt</tt> if you have the
+<prgn>doc-debian</prgn> package installed.
        <p>
 When replying to messages on the mailing list, please do not send a
 carbon copy (<tt/CC/--this does not mean `courtesy copy') to the
@@ -182,12 +249,25 @@ following mailing lists: <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/,
 <email/debian-policy@lists.debian.org/,
 <email/debian-user@lists.debian.org/,
 <email/debian-announce@lists.debian.org/, or
-<email/debian-devel-announce@lists.debian.org/.  Cross-posting is
+<email/debian-devel-announce@lists.debian.org/.  Additional mailing
+lists are available for special purposes; see <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe">.  Cross-posting is
 discouraged.
        <p>
+<email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/ is a special mailing lists for
+private discussions amongst Debian developers.  It is meant to be used
+for posts which for whatever reason should not be published
+publically.  As such, it is a low volume list, and users are urged not
+to use <email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/ unless it is really
+necessary.  Moreover, do <em/not/ forward email from that list to
+anyone.
+       <p>
 As ever on the net, please trim down the quoting of articles you're
 replying to.  In general, please adhere to the usual conventions for
 posting messages.
+       <p>
+Online archives of mailing lists are available at <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/Lists-Archives/">.
 
 
       <sect>The master server
@@ -204,7 +284,7 @@ developers have accounts on this machine.
        <p>
 
 
-    <chapt>The Debian Archive
+    <chapt id="archive">The Debian Archive
 
       <sect>Overview
        <p>
@@ -270,23 +350,26 @@ sections do not fully comply with all our guidelines.  As such, they
 are not officially part of Debian.
        <p>
 For example, every package in the main distribution must fully comply
-with the <em>Debian Free Software Guidelines</> (DFSG) and with all
-other policy requirements as described in the <em>Debian Policy
-Manual</em>. (The DFSG is our definition of ``free software.'' Check
-out the Debian Policy Manual for details.)
+with the <url id="http://www.debian.org/social_contract#guidelines"
+name="Debian Free Software Guidelines"> (DFSG) and with all other
+policy requirements as described in the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/" name="Debian Policy
+Manual">. (The DFSG is our definition of ``free software.'' Check out
+the Debian Policy Manual for details.)
        <p>
 The packages which do not apply to the DFSG are placed in the
-<em>non-free</> section. These packages are not considered as part of
+<em/non-free/ section. These packages are not considered as part of
 the Debian distribution, though we support their use, and we provide
 infrastructure (such as our bug-tracking system and mailing lists) for
 non-free software packages.
        <p>
-Packages in the <em>contrib</> section have to apply to the DFSG, but
+Packages in the <em/contrib/ section have to apply to the DFSG, but
 fail other requirements.  For instance, they might depend on non-free
 packages.
        <p>
-(The Debian Policy Manual contains a more exact definition of the
-three sections. This is just meant to be an introduction.)
+(The <url id="http://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/" name="Debian
+Policy Manual"> contains a more exact definition of the three
+sections. This is just meant to be an introduction.)
        <p>
 The separation of the three sections at the top-level of the archive
 is important for all people who want to distribute Debian, either via
@@ -363,6 +446,8 @@ are contained in the <tt/dists/ directory in the top-level of the
 Debian archive (the symlinks from the top-level directory to the
 distributions themselves is for backwards compatability and
 deprecated).
+
+       <sect1>Stable, unstable, and sometimes frozen
        <p>
 There is always a distribution called <em/stable/ (residing in
 <tt>dists/stable</tt>) and one called <em/unstable/ (residing in
@@ -384,24 +469,50 @@ little longer, the <em/frozen/ distribution is renamed to <em/stable/,
 overriding the old <em/stable/ distribution, which is removed at that
 time.
        <p>
-This development cycle is based on the assumption that the `unstable'
-distribution becomes `stable' after passing a period of testing as
-`frozen'. Unfortunately, even once a distribution is considered
-`stable', a few bugs inevitably remain--that's why the stable
-distribution is updated every now and then. However, these updates are
-tested very carefully and have to be acknowledged individually to
-reduce the risk of introducing new bugs.  You can find proposed
-additions to `stable' in the <tt/proposed-updates/ directory.
+This development cycle is based on the assumption that the
+<em/unstable/ distribution becomes <em/stable/ after passing a period
+of testing as <em/frozen/. Unfortunately, even once a distribution is
+considered <em/stable/, a few bugs inevitably remain--that's why the
+stable distribution is updated every now and then. However, these
+updates are tested very carefully and have to be acknowledged
+individually to reduce the risk of introducing new bugs.  You can find
+proposed additions to <em/stable/ in the <tt/proposed-updates/
+directory.
        <p>
 Note, that development is continued during the ``freeze'' period,
-since a new `unstable' distribution is be created when the older
-`unstable' is moved to `frozen'.
+since a new <em/unstable/ distribution is be created when the older
+<em/unstable/ is moved to <em/frozen/.
        <p>
 In summary, there is always a <em/stable/ and an <em/unstable/
 distribution available, and the <em/frozen/ distribution shows up for
 a month or so from time to time.
 
-      <sect>Release code names
+
+       <sect1>Experimental
+         <p>
+The <em/experimental/ distribution is a specialty distribution.  It is
+not a full distribution in the same sense that 'stable' and 'unstable'
+are.  Instead, it is meant to be a temporary staging area for highly
+experimental software where there's a good chance that the software
+could break your system.  Users who download and install packages from
+<em/experimental/ are expected to have been duly warned.  In short,
+all bets are off for the <em/experimental/ distribution.
+         <p>
+Developers should be very selective in the use of the
+<em/experimental/ distribution.  Even if a package is highly unstable,
+it could well still go into <em/unstable/; just state a few warnings
+in the description.  However, if there is a chance that the software
+could do grave damage to a system, it might be better to put it into
+<em/experimental/.
+         <p>
+For instance, an experimental encrypted filesystem should probably go
+into experimental.  A new, beta, version of some software which uses
+completely different configuration might go into experimental at the
+maintainer's discretion.  New software which isn't likely to damage
+your system can go into <em/unstable/.
+
+
+      <sect id="codenames">Release code names
        <p>
 Every released Debian distribution has a <em/code name/: Debian 1.1 is
 called <em/buzz/, Debian 1.2 <em/rex/, Debian 1.3 <em/bo/, Debian 2.0
@@ -494,7 +605,7 @@ package (conflict and replace old package name at a minimum).
          </list>
 
 
-      <sect>Uploading a package
+      <sect id="uploading">Uploading a package
 
        <sect1>Generating the changes file
          <p>
@@ -519,22 +630,26 @@ This file is a control file with the following fields:
            </list>
          <p>
 All of them are mandatory for a Debian upload.  See the list of
-control fields in the <em/Debian Packaging Manual/ for the contents of
-these fields.
+control fields in the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/doc/packaging-manuals/packaging.html/"
+name="Debian Packaging Manual"> for the contents of these fields.
          <p>
 Notably, the <tt/Distribution/ field, which originates from the
 <tt>debian/changelog</tt> file, should indicate which distribution the
-package is intended for.  There are three possible values for this
-field: `stable', `unstable', or `frozen'; these values can also be
-combined.  For instance, if you have a crucial security fix release of
-a package, and the package has not diverged between the `stable' and
-`unstable' distributions, then you might put `stable unstable' in the
-<tt>debian/changelog</tt>'s distribution field.  Or, if Debian has
-been frozen, and you want to get a bug-fix release into `frozen', you
-would set the distribution to `frozen unstable'.  Note that setting
-the distribution to `stable' means that the pacakge will be placed
-into the <tt>proposed-updates</tt> directory of the Debian archive for
-further testing, before it is actually included in `stable'.
+package is intended for.  There are four possible values for this
+field: <em/stable/, <em/unstable/, <em/frozen/, or <em/experimental/;
+these values can also be combined.  For instance, if you have a
+crucial security fix release of a package, and the package has not
+diverged between the <em/stable/ and <em/unstable/ distributions, then
+you might put <tt/stable unstable/ in the <tt>debian/changelog</tt>'s
+distribution field.  Or, if Debian has been frozen, and you want to
+get a bug-fix release into <em/frozen/, you would set the distribution
+to <tt/frozen unstable/.  Note that setting the distribution to
+<tt/stable/ means that the pacakge will be placed into the
+<tt>proposed-updates</tt> directory of the Debian archive for further
+testing, before it is actually included in <em/stable/.  Also note
+that it never makes sense to combine the <em/experimental/
+distribution with anything else.
 
          <p>
 The first time a version is uploaded which corresponds to a particular
@@ -558,7 +673,7 @@ reason why this is not the case then the new version of the original
 source should be uploaded, possibly by using the <tt/-sa/ flag.
 
 
-       <sect1>Checking the package prior to upload
+       <sect1 id="upload-checking">Checking the package prior to upload
          <p>
 Before you upload your package, you should do basic testing on it.
 Make sure you try the following activities (you'll need to have an
@@ -587,7 +702,7 @@ older version of the Debian package around).
            </list>
 
 
-       <sect1>Transferring the files to master
+       <sect1 id="upload-master">Transferring the files to master
          <p>
 To upload a package, you need a personal account on
 <ftpsite>master.debian.org</ftpsite>.  All maintainers should already
@@ -657,7 +772,7 @@ the keys of the developers keyring.
 When a package is uploaded an announcement should be posted to one of
 the debian-changes lists. The announcement should give the (source)
 package name and version number, and a very short summary of the
-changes, in the <tt/Subject/ field, and should contain the PGP-signed
+changes, in the <em/Subject/ field, and should contain the PGP-signed
 <tt/.changes/ file.  Some additional explanatory text may be added
 before the start of the <tt/.changes/ file.
        <p>
@@ -693,7 +808,7 @@ out-of-sync with your control file.  In these cases, you should either
 correct your control file or file a bug against <tt/ftp.debian.org/
 using the BTS.
 
-      <sect>Interim releases
+      <sect id="nmu">Interim releases
        <p>
 Under certain circumstances it is necessary for someone other than the
 usual package maintainer to make a release of a package.  For example,
@@ -742,9 +857,8 @@ set the severity of the bugs fixed in the NMU to "fixed".  This
 ensures that everyone knows that the bug was fixed in an NMU; however
 the bug is left open until the changes in the NMU are incorporated
 "officially" into the package by the offical package maintainer.
-
        <p>
-The normal maintainer should do at least one of
+The normal maintainer should do at least one of the following:
          <list compact>
            <item>
 apply the diff,
@@ -783,7 +897,7 @@ for a while, send an email to <email/override-change@debian.org/ so
 that bug reports will go to you.
 
 
-    <chapt>Moving, removing, renaming, and orphaning packages
+    <chapt id="archive-manip">Moving, Removing, Renaming, and Orphaning Packages
       <p>
 Some archive manipulation operation are not automated in the Debian
 upload process.  This chapter gives guidelines in what to do in these
@@ -794,16 +908,21 @@ cases.
 Sometimes a package will change either it's section or it's
 subsection.  For instance, a package from the `non-free' section might
 be GPL'd in a later version; in this case you should consider moving
-it to `main' or `contrib' (see the <em/Policy Manual/ for guidelines).
+it to `main' or `contrib' (see the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/" name="Debian Policy
+Manual"> for guidelines).
        <p>
 In this case, it is sufficient to edit the package control information
-normally and re-upload the package (see the <em/Packaging Manual/ for
+normally and re-upload the package (see the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/doc/packaging-manuals/packaging.html/"
+name="Debian Packaging Manual"> for
 details).  Carefully examine the installation log sent to you when the
 package is installed into the archive.  If for some reason the old
 location of the package remains, file a bug against
 <prgn/ftp.debian.org/ asking that the old location be removed.  Give
 details on what you did, since it might be a <prgn/dinstall/ bug.
 
+
       <sect>Removing packages
        <p>
 If for some reason you want to completely remove a package (say, if it
@@ -815,15 +934,19 @@ package should be removed from.
 If in doubt concerning whether a package is disposable, email
 <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ asking for opinions.
 
+
       <sect>Replacing or renaming packages
        <p>
 Sometimes you made a mistake naming the package and you need to rename
 it.  In this case, you need to follow a two-step process.  First, set
 your <tt>debian/control</tt> file to replace and conflict with the
-obsolete name of the package (see the <em/Packaging Manual/ for
-details).  Once you've uploaded that package, and the package has
-moved into the archive, file a bug against <prgn/ftp.debian.org/
-asking to remove the package with the obsolete name.
+obsolete name of the package (see the <url
+id="http://www.debian.org/doc/packaging-manuals/packaging.html/"
+name="Debian Packaging Manual"> for details).  Once you've uploaded
+that package, and the package has moved into the archive, file a bug
+against <prgn/ftp.debian.org/ asking to remove the package with the
+obsolete name.
+
 
       <sect>Orphaning a package
        <p>
@@ -836,7 +959,7 @@ email <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ asking for a new
 maintainer.
 
 
-    <chapt>Handling bug reports
+    <chapt id="bug-handling">Handling Bug Reports
 
       <sect>Monitoring bugs
        <p>
@@ -862,6 +985,7 @@ been fixed.  Note that when you are neither the bug submitter nor the
 package maintainer, you are not empowered to actually close the bug
 (unless you secure permission from the maintainer).
 
+
       <sect>When bugs are closed by new uploads
        <p>
 If you fix a bug in your packages, it is your responsibility as the
@@ -876,7 +1000,7 @@ Often, it's sufficient to mail the <tt/.changes file to
 <email/<var/XXX/-done@bugs.debian.org/, where <var/XXX/ is your bug
 number.
 
-      <sect>Lintian reports
+      <sect id="lintian-reports">Lintian reports
        <p>
 You should periodically get the new <prgn/lintian/ from `unstable' and
 check over all your packages.  Alternatively you can check for you're
@@ -900,7 +1024,89 @@ Note, that when sending lots of bugs on the same subject, you should
 send the bug report to <email/maintonly@bugs.debian.org/ so that the
 bug report is not forwarded to the bug distribution mailing list.
 
-         
+
+    <chapt id="tools">Whirlwind Tour of Debian Maintainer Tools
+      <p>
+This section contains a rough overview of the tools available to
+maintainers.  These tools are meant to help convenience developers and 
+free their time for critical tasks.  
+      <p>
+Some people prefer to use high-level package maintenance tools and
+some do not.  Debian is officially agnostic on this issue, other than
+making the attempt to accomodate the reasonable wishes of developers.
+Therefore, this section is not meant to stipulate to anyone which
+tools they should use or how they should go about with their duties of
+maintainership.  Nor is it meant to endorse any particular tool to the
+exclusion of a competing tool.
+      <p>
+Most of the descriptions of these packages come from the actual
+package descriptions themselves.
+
+      <sect id="dpkg-dev">
+       <heading><prgn>dpkg-dev</prgn>
+       <p>
+<prgn>dpkg-dev</prgn> contains the tools (including
+<prgn/dpkg-source/) required to unpack, build and upload Debian source
+packages.  These utilities contain the fundamental, low-level
+functionality required to create and manipulated packages; as such,
+they are required for any Debian maintainer.
+
+      <sect id="lintian">
+       <heading><prgn>lintian</prgn>
+       <p>
+<prgn>Lintian</prgn> dissects Debian packages and reports bugs and
+policy violations. It contains automated checks for many aspects of
+Debian policy as well as some checks for common errors.  The use of
+<prgn>lintian</prgn> has already been discussed in <ref
+id="upload-checking"> and <ref id="lintian-reports">.
+
+      <sect id="debhelper">
+       <heading><prgn>debhelper</prgn>
+       <p>
+<prgn>debhelper</prgn> is a collection of programs that can be used in
+<tt>debian/rules</tt> to automate common tasks related to building
+binary Debian packages. Programs are included to install various files
+into your package, compress files, fix file permissions, integrate
+your package with the Debian menu system.
+       <p>
+Unlike <prgn>debmake</prgn>, <prgn>debhelper</prgn> is broken into
+several small, granular commands which act in a consistent manner.  As
+such, it allows a greater granularity of control than
+<prgn>debmake</prgn>.
+
+      <sect id="debmake">
+       <heading><prgn>debmake</prgn>
+       <p>
+<prgn>debmake</prgn>, a pre-cursor to <prgn>debhelper</prgn>, is a
+less granular <tt>debian/rules</tt> assistant. It includes two main
+programs: <prgn>deb-make</prgn>, which can be used to help a
+maintainer convert a regular (non-Debian) source archive into a Debian
+source package; and <prgn>debstd</prgn>, which incorporates in one big
+shot the same sort of automated functions that one finds in
+<prgn>debhelper</prgn>.
+
+      <sect id="cvs-buildpackage">
+       <heading><prgn>cvs-buildpackage</prgn>
+       <p>
+<prgn>cvs-buildpackage</prgn> provides the capability to inject or
+import Debian source packages into a CVS repository, build a Debian
+package from the CVS repository, and helps in integrating upstream
+changes into the repository.
+       <p>
+These utilities provide an infrastructure to facilitate the use of CVS
+by Debian maintainers. This allows one to keep separate CVS branches
+of a package for <em/stable/, <em/unstable/, and possibly
+<em/experimental/ distributions, along with the other benefits of a
+version control system.
+
+      <sect id="dupload">
+       <heading><prgn>dupload</prgn>
+       <p>
+<prgn>dupload</prgn> is a package and a script to automagically upload
+Debian packages to the Debian archive, to log the upload, and to send
+mail about the upload of a package.  You can configure it for new
+upload locations or methods.
+
   </book>
 </debiandoc>