chiark / gitweb /
Update Standards-Version to 3.9.5 (no change required).
[developers-reference.git] / pkgs.dbk
index baec071..873c42c 100644 (file)
--- a/pkgs.dbk
+++ b/pkgs.dbk
@@ -21,22 +21,22 @@ pages</ulink> for more information.
 </para>
 <para>
 Assuming no one else is already working on your prospective package, you must
-then submit a bug report (<xref linkend="submit-bug"/> ) against the
+then submit a bug report (<xref linkend="submit-bug"/>) against the
 pseudo-package <systemitem role="package">wnpp</systemitem> describing your
 plan to create a new package, including, but not limiting yourself to, a
 description of the package, the license of the prospective package, and the
 current URL where it can be downloaded from.
 </para>
 <para>
-You should set the subject of the bug to <literal>ITP: 
+You should set the subject of the bug to <literal>ITP:
 <replaceable>foo</replaceable> -- <replaceable>short
 description</replaceable></literal>, substituting the name of the new
-package for <replaceable>foo</replaceable>. 
+package for <replaceable>foo</replaceable>.
 The severity of the bug report must be set to <literal>wishlist</literal>.
 Please send a copy to &email-debian-devel; by using the X-Debbugs-CC
 header (don't use CC:, because that way the message's subject won't
 indicate the bug number). If you are packaging so many new packages (>10)
-that notifying the mailing list in seperate messages is too disruptive,
+that notifying the mailing list in separate messages is too disruptive,
 send a summary after filing the bugs to the debian-devel list instead.
 This will inform the other developers about upcoming packages and will
 allow a review of your description and package name.
@@ -49,12 +49,13 @@ be automatically closed once the new package is installed in the archive
 </para>
 <para>
 If you think your package needs some explanations for the administrators of the
-NEW package queue, include them in your changelog, send to ftpmaster@debian.org
+NEW package queue, include them in your changelog, send to &email-ftpmaster;
 a reply to the email you receive as a maintainer after your upload, or reply to
 the rejection email in case you are already re-uploading.
 </para>
 <para>
-When closing security bugs include CVE numbers as well as the Closes: #nnnnn.
+When closing security bugs include CVE numbers as well as the
+<literal>Closes: #<replaceable>nnnnn</replaceable></literal>.  
 This is useful for the security team to track vulnerabilities.  If an upload is
 made to fix the bug before the advisory ID is known, it is encouraged to modify
 the historical changelog entry with the next upload.  Even in this case, please
@@ -121,28 +122,28 @@ for native packages.
 The <filename>debian/changelog</filename> file conforms to a certain structure,
 with a number of different fields.  One field of note, the
 <literal>distribution</literal>, is described in <xref
-linkend="distribution"/> .  More information about the structure of this file
+linkend="distribution"/>.  More information about the structure of this file
 can be found in the Debian Policy section titled
 <filename>debian/changelog</filename>.
 </para>
 <para>
 Changelog entries can be used to automatically close Debian bugs when the
-package is installed into the archive.  See <xref linkend="upload-bugfix"/> .
+package is installed into the archive.  See <xref linkend="upload-bugfix"/>.
 </para>
 <para>
 It is conventional that the changelog entry of a package that contains a new
 upstream version of the software looks like this:
 </para>
 <screen>
-  * new upstream version
+  * New upstream release.
 </screen>
 <para>
 There are tools to help you create entries and finalize the
 <filename>changelog</filename> for release — see <xref linkend="devscripts"/>
-and <xref linkend="dpkg-dev-el"/> .
+and <xref linkend="dpkg-dev-el"/>.
 </para>
 <para>
-See also <xref linkend="bpp-debian-changelog"/> .
+See also <xref linkend="bpp-debian-changelog"/>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -173,16 +174,16 @@ output a very verbose description of the problem.
 </para>
 <para>
 Normally, a package should <emphasis>not</emphasis> be uploaded if it causes
-lintian to emit errors (they will start with <literal>E</literal>).
+<command>lintian</command> to emit errors (they will start with <literal>E</literal>).
 </para>
 <para>
 For more information on <command>lintian</command>, see <xref
-linkend="lintian"/> .
+linkend="lintian"/>.
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Optionally run <xref linkend="debdiff"/> to analyze changes from an older
+Optionally run <command>debdiff</command> (see <xref linkend="debdiff"/>) to analyze changes from an older
 version, if one exists.
 </para>
 </listitem>
@@ -202,7 +203,7 @@ Remove the package, then reinstall it.
 Copy the source package in a different directory and try unpacking it and
 rebuilding it.  This tests if the package relies on existing files outside of
 it, or if it relies on permissions being preserved on the files shipped inside
-the .diff.gz file.
+the <filename>.diff.gz</filename> file.
 </para>
 </listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
@@ -229,12 +230,12 @@ accompanied by another file that contains the changes made by Debian
 </itemizedlist>
 <para>
 For the native packages, the source package includes a Debian source control
-file (<literal>.dsc</literal>) and the source tarball
-(<literal>.tar.{gz,bz2,lzma}</literal>). A source package of a non-native package
+file (<filename>.dsc</filename>) and the source tarball
+(<filename>.tar.{gz,bz2,xz}</filename>). A source package of a non-native package
 includes a Debian source control file, the original source tarball
-(<literal>.orig.tar.{gz,bz2,lzma}</literal>) and the Debian changes
-(<literal>.diff.gz</literal> for the source format “1.0” or
-<literal>.debian.tar.{gz,bz2,lzma}</literal> for the source format “3.0 (quilt)”).
+(<filename>.orig.tar.{gz,bz2,xz}</filename>) and the Debian changes
+(<filename>.diff.gz</filename> for the source format “1.0” or
+<filename>.debian.tar.{gz,bz2,xz}</filename> for the source format “3.0 (quilt)”).
 </para>
 <para>
 With source format “1.0”, whether a package is native or not was determined
@@ -267,7 +268,7 @@ the archive.
 </para>
 <para>
 Please notice that, in non-native packages, permissions on files that are not
-present in the .orig.tar.{gz,bz2} will not be preserved, as diff does not store file
+present in the <filename>*.orig.tar.{gz,bz2,xz}</filename> will not be preserved, as diff does not store file
 permissions in the patch. However when using source format “3.0 (quilt)”,
 permissions of files inside the <filename>debian</filename> directory are
 preserved since they are stored in a tar archive.
@@ -280,7 +281,7 @@ preserved since they are stored in a tar archive.
 Each upload needs to specify which distribution the package is intended for.
 The package build process extracts this information from the first line of the
 <filename>debian/changelog</filename> file and places it in the
-<literal>Distribution</literal> field of the <literal>.changes</literal> file.
+<literal>Distribution</literal> field of the <filename>.changes</filename> file.
 </para>
 <para>
 There are several possible values for this field: <literal>stable</literal>,
@@ -289,16 +290,16 @@ There are several possible values for this field: <literal>stable</literal>,
 <literal>unstable</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
-Actually, there are two other possible distributions: <literal>stable-security
-</literal> and <literal>testing-security</literal>, but read 
-<xref linkend="bug-security"/> for more information on those.
+Actually, there are other possible distributions:
+<replaceable>codename</replaceable><literal>-security</literal>,
+but read <xref linkend="bug-security"/> for more information on those.
 </para>
 <para>
 It is not possible to upload a package into several distributions at the same
 time.
 </para>
 <section id="upload-stable">
-<title>Special case: uploads to the <literal>stable</literal> and 
+<title>Special case: uploads to the <literal>stable</literal> and
 <literal>oldstable</literal> distributions</title>
 <para>
 Uploading to <literal>stable</literal> means that the package will transferred
@@ -310,8 +311,9 @@ point release.
 </para>
 <para>
 To ensure that your upload will be accepted, you should discuss the changes
-with the stable release team before you upload. For that, send a mail to
-the &email-debian-release; mailing list, including the patch you want to
+with the stable release team before you upload. For that, file a bug against
+the <systemitem role="package">release.debian.org</systemitem> pseudo-package
+using <command>reportbug</command>, including the patch you want to
 apply to the package version currently in <literal>stable</literal>. Always
 be verbose and detailed in your changelog entries for uploads to the
 <literal>stable</literal> distribution.
@@ -358,15 +360,15 @@ Packages uploaded to <literal>stable</literal> need to be compiled on systems
 running <literal>stable</literal>, so that their dependencies are limited to
 the libraries (and other packages) available in <literal>stable</literal>;
 for example, a package uploaded to <literal>stable</literal> that depends on
-a library package that only exists in <literal>unstable</literal> will be 
+a library package that only exists in <literal>unstable</literal> will be
 rejected.  Making changes to dependencies of other packages (by messing with
-<literal>Provides</literal> or <literal>shlibs</literal> files), possibly 
+<literal>Provides</literal> or <filename>shlibs</filename> files), possibly
 making those other packages uninstallable, is strongly discouraged.
 </para>
 <para>
 Uploads to the <literal>oldstable</literal> distributions are possible as
-long as it hasn't been archived. The same rules as for <literal>stable
-</literal> apply.
+long as it hasn't been archived. The same rules as for <literal>stable</literal>
+apply.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -399,14 +401,14 @@ upload may be rejected because the archive maintenance software will parse the
 changes file and see that not all files have been uploaded.
 </para>
 <para>
-You may also find the Debian packages <xref linkend="dupload"/> or <xref
-linkend="dput"/> useful when uploading packages.  These handy programs help
-automate the process of uploading packages into Debian.
+You may also find the Debian packages <link linkend="dupload">dupload</link>
+or <link linkend="dput">dput</link> useful when uploading packages.These
+handy programs help automate the process of uploading packages into Debian.
 </para>
 <para>
 For removing packages, please see
-<ulink url="ftp://&ftp-upload-host;&upload-queue;/README"/> and
-the Debian package <xref linkend="dcut"/> .
+<ulink url="ftp://&ftp-upload-host;&upload-queue;README"/> and
+the Debian package <link linkend="dcut">dcut</link>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -416,19 +418,19 @@ the Debian package <xref linkend="dcut"/> .
 <para>
 It is sometimes useful to upload a package immediately, but to want this
 package to arrive in the archive only a few days later. For example,
-when preparing a <link linkend="nmu">Non-maintainer Upload</link>,
+when preparing a <link linkend="nmu">Non-Maintainer Upload</link>,
 you might want to give the maintainer a few days to react.
 </para>
 
 <para>
 An upload to the delayed directory keeps the package in
-<ulink url="http://ftp-master.debian.org/deferred.html">
-the deferred uploads queue"</ulink>.
+<ulink url="http://ftp-master.debian.org/deferred.html">the deferred uploads queue</ulink>.
 When the specified waiting time is over, the package is moved into
 the regular incoming directory for processing.
 This is done through automatic uploading to
 <literal>&ftp-upload-host;</literal> in upload-directory
-<literal>DELAYED/[012345678]-day</literal>. 0-day is uploaded
+<literal>DELAYED/<replaceable>X</replaceable>-day</literal>
+(<replaceable>X</replaceable> between 0 and 15). 0-day is uploaded
 multiple times per day to <literal>&ftp-upload-host;</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -441,11 +443,11 @@ parameter to put the package into one of the queues.
 <title>Security uploads</title>
 <para>
 Do <emphasis role="strong">NOT</emphasis> upload a package to the security
-upload queue (<literal>oldstable-security</literal>, <literal>stable-security
-</literal>, etc.) without prior authorization from the security team.  If the
+upload queue (on <literal>security-master.debian.org</literal>)
+without prior authorization from the security team.  If the
 package does not exactly meet the team's requirements, it will cause many
 problems and delays in dealing with the unwanted upload.  For details, please
-see section <xref linkend="bug-security"/> .
+see <xref linkend="bug-security"/>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -461,7 +463,7 @@ for European developers.
 Packages can also be uploaded via ssh to
 <literal>&ssh-upload-host;</literal>; files should be put
 <literal>/srv/upload.debian.org/UploadQueue</literal>. This queue does
-not support <xref linkend="delayed-incoming">delayed uploads</xref>.
+not support <link linkend="delayed-incoming">delayed uploads</link>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -470,11 +472,11 @@ not support <xref linkend="delayed-incoming">delayed uploads</xref>.
 <para>
 The Debian archive maintainers are responsible for handling package uploads.
 For the most part, uploads are automatically handled on a daily basis by the
-archive maintenance tools, <command>katie</command>.  Specifically, updates to
-existing packages to the <literal>unstable</literal> distribution are handled
-automatically.  In other cases, notably new packages, placing the uploaded 
-package into the distribution is handled manually.  When uploads are handled
-manually, the change to the archive may take up to a month to occur.  Please
+archive maintenance tools, <command>dak process-upload</command>. Specifically,
+updates to existing packages to the <literal>unstable</literal> distribution are
+handled automatically. In other cases, notably new packages, placing the
+uploaded package into the distribution is handled manually. When uploads are
+handled manually, the change to the archive may take some time to occur. Please
 be patient.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -536,7 +538,7 @@ url="&url-bts-devel;#maintincorrect"></ulink>.
 <para>
 Note that the <literal>Section</literal> field describes both the section as
 well as the subsection, which are described in <xref
-linkend="archive-sections"/> .  If the section is main, it should be omitted.
+linkend="archive-sections"/>.  If the section is main, it should be omitted.
 The list of allowable subsections can be found in <ulink
 url="&url-debian-policy;ch-archive.html#s-subsections"></ulink>.
 </para>
@@ -547,7 +549,7 @@ url="&url-debian-policy;ch-archive.html#s-subsections"></ulink>.
 <para>
 Every developer has to be able to work with the Debian <ulink
 url="&url-bts;">bug tracking system</ulink>.  This includes
-knowing how to file bug reports properly (see <xref linkend="submit-bug"/> ),
+knowing how to file bug reports properly (see <xref linkend="submit-bug"/>),
 how to update them and reorder them, and how to process and close them.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -600,11 +602,11 @@ address.
 <para>
 When responding to bugs, make sure that any discussion you have about bugs is
 sent both to the original submitter of the bug, and to the bug itself (e.g.,
-<email>123@&bugs-host;</email>).  If you're writing a new mail and you
+<email><replaceable>123</replaceable>@&bugs-host;</email>).  If you're writing a new mail and you
 don't remember the submitter email address, you can use the
-<email>123-submitter@&bugs-host;</email> email to contact the submitter
+<email><replaceable>123</replaceable>-submitter@&bugs-host;</email> email to contact the submitter
 <emphasis>and</emphasis> to record your mail within the bug log (that means you
-don't need to send a copy of the mail to <email>123@&bugs-host;</email>).
+don't need to send a copy of the mail to <email><replaceable>123</replaceable>@&bugs-host;</email>).
 </para>
 <para>
 If you get a bug which mentions FTBFS, this means Fails to build from source.
@@ -613,9 +615,9 @@ Porters frequently use this acronym.
 <para>
 Once you've dealt with a bug report (e.g.  fixed it), mark it as
 <literal>done</literal> (close it) by sending an explanation message to
-<email>123-done@&bugs-host;</email>.  If you're fixing a bug by changing
+<email><replaceable>123</replaceable>-done@&bugs-host;</email>.  If you're fixing a bug by changing
 and uploading the package, you can automate bug closing as described in <xref
-linkend="upload-bugfix"/> .
+linkend="upload-bugfix"/>.
 </para>
 <para>
 You should <emphasis>never</emphasis> close bugs via the bug server
@@ -678,7 +680,7 @@ the right package.  If you don't know which package it should be reassigned to,
 you should ask for help on <link linkend="irc-channels">IRC</link> or
 on &email-debian-devel;.  Please inform the maintainer(s) of the package
 you reassign the bug to, for example by Cc:ing the message that does the
-reassign to <email>packagename@packages.debian.org</email> and explaining
+reassign to <email><replaceable>packagename</replaceable>@packages.debian.org</email> and explaining
 your reasons in that mail. Please note that a simple reassignment is
 <emphasis>not</emphasis> e-mailed to the maintainers of the package
 being reassigned to, so they won't know about it until they look at
@@ -740,7 +742,7 @@ bug as <literal>patch</literal>.
 <listitem>
 <para>
 If you have fixed a bug in your local copy, or if a fix has been committed to
-the CVS repository, you may tag the bug as <literal>pending</literal> to let
+the VCS repository, you may tag the bug as <literal>pending</literal> to let
 people know that the bug is corrected and that it will be closed with the next
 upload (add the <literal>closes:</literal> in the
 <filename>changelog</filename>).  This is particularly useful if you are
@@ -792,13 +794,13 @@ closing changelogs are identified:
 We prefer the <literal>closes: #<replaceable>XXX</replaceable></literal>
 syntax, as it is the most concise entry and the easiest to integrate with the
 text of the <filename>changelog</filename>.  Unless specified different by the
-<replaceable>-v</replaceable>-switch to <command>dpkg-buildpackage</command>,
+<literal>-v</literal>-switch to <command>dpkg-buildpackage</command>,
 only the bugs closed in the most recent changelog entry are closed (basically,
 exactly the bugs mentioned in the changelog-part in the
 <filename>.changes</filename> file are closed).
 </para>
 <para>
-Historically, uploads identified as <link linkend="nmu">Non-maintainer
+Historically, uploads identified as <link linkend="nmu">non-maintainer
 upload (NMU)</link> were tagged <literal>fixed</literal> instead of being
 closed, but that practice was ceased with the advent of version-tracking.  The
 same applied to the tag <literal>fixed-in-experimental</literal>.
@@ -810,8 +812,8 @@ bugs, send a <literal>reopen <replaceable>XXX</replaceable></literal> command
 to the bug tracking system's control address,
 &email-bts-control;.  To close any remaining bugs that were
 fixed by your upload, email the <filename>.changes</filename> file to
-<email>XXX-done@&bugs-host;</email>, where <replaceable>XXX</replaceable>
-is the bug number, and put Version: YYY and an empty line as the first two
+<email><replaceable>XXX</replaceable>-done@&bugs-host;</email>, where <replaceable>XXX</replaceable>
+is the bug number, and put Version: <replaceable>YYY</replaceable> and an empty line as the first two
 lines of the body of the email, where <replaceable>YYY</replaceable> is the
 first version where the bug has been fixed.
 </para>
@@ -819,13 +821,13 @@ first version where the bug has been fixed.
 Bear in mind that it is not obligatory to close bugs using the changelog as
 described above.  If you simply want to close bugs that don't have anything to
 do with an upload you made, do it by emailing an explanation to
-<email>XXX-done@&bugs-host;</email>.  Do <emphasis
+<email><replaceable>XXX</replaceable>-done@&bugs-host;</email>.  Do <emphasis
 role="strong">not</emphasis> close bugs in the changelog entry of a version if
 the changes in that version of the package don't have any bearing on the bug.
 </para>
 <para>
 For general information on how to write your changelog entries, see <xref
-linkend="bpp-debian-changelog"/> .
+linkend="bpp-debian-changelog"/>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -841,16 +843,23 @@ fixing them themselves, sending security advisories, and maintaining
 <para>
 When you become aware of a security-related bug in a Debian package, whether or
 not you are the maintainer, collect pertinent information about the problem,
-and promptly contact the security team at
-&email-security-team; as soon as possible.  <emphasis
-role="strong">DO NOT UPLOAD</emphasis> any packages for <literal>stable</literal>
-without contacting the team.  Useful information includes, for example:
+and promptly contact the security team by emailing &email-security-team;. If
+desired, email can be encrypted with the Debian Security Contact key, see
+<ulink url="https://www.debian.org/security/faq#contact"/> for details.
+<emphasis role="strong">DO NOT UPLOAD</emphasis> any packages for
+<literal>stable</literal> without contacting the team.  Useful information
+includes, for example:
 </para>
 <itemizedlist>
 <listitem>
 <para>
+Whether or not the bug is already public.
+</para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+<para>
 Which versions of the package are known to be affected by the bug.  Check each
-version that is present in a supported Debian release, as well as 
+version that is present in a supported Debian release, as well as
 <literal>testing</literal> and <literal>unstable</literal>.
 </para>
 </listitem>
@@ -862,7 +871,7 @@ The nature of the fix, if any is available (patches are especially helpful)
 <listitem>
 <para>
 Any fixed packages that you have prepared yourself (send only the
-<literal>.diff.gz</literal> and <literal>.dsc</literal> files and read <xref
+<filename>.diff.gz</filename> and <filename>.dsc</filename> files and read <xref
 linkend="bug-security-building"/> first)
 </para>
 </listitem>
@@ -875,7 +884,7 @@ testing, etc.)
 <listitem>
 <para>
 Any information needed for the advisory (see <xref
-linkend="bug-security-advisories"/> )
+linkend="bug-security-advisories"/>)
 </para>
 </listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
@@ -960,9 +969,9 @@ release of Debian.  When sending confidential information to the security team,
 be sure to mention this fact.
 </para>
 <para>
-Please note that if secrecy is needed you may not upload a fix to 
+Please note that if secrecy is needed you may not upload a fix to
 <literal>unstable</literal> (or
-anywhere else, such as a public CVS repository).  It is not sufficient to
+anywhere else, such as a public VCS repository).  It is not sufficient to
 obfuscate the details of the change, as the code itself is public, and can (and
 will) be examined by the general public.
 </para>
@@ -1103,7 +1112,7 @@ the previous version repeatedly (<command>interdiff</command> from the
 <systemitem role="package">patchutils</systemitem> package and
 <command>debdiff</command> from <systemitem
 role="package">devscripts</systemitem> are useful tools for this, see <xref
-linkend="debdiff"/> ).
+linkend="debdiff"/>).
 </para>
 <para>
 Be sure to verify the following items:
@@ -1112,11 +1121,10 @@ Be sure to verify the following items:
 <listitem>
 <para>
 <emphasis role="strong">Target the right distribution</emphasis>
-in your <filename>debian/changelog</filename>.
-For <literal>stable</literal> this is <literal>stable-security</literal> and
-for <literal>testing</literal> this is <literal>testing-security</literal>, and for the previous
-stable release, this is <literal>oldstable-security</literal>.  Do not target
-<replaceable>distribution</replaceable><literal>-proposed-updates</literal> or
+in your <filename>debian/changelog</filename>:
+<replaceable>codename</replaceable><literal>-security</literal>
+(e.g. <literal>wheezy-security</literal>).
+Do not target <replaceable>distribution</replaceable><literal>-proposed-updates</literal> or
 <literal>stable</literal>!
 </para>
 </listitem>
@@ -1138,31 +1146,33 @@ process. The identifier can be cross-referenced later.
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Make sure the <emphasis role="strong">version number</emphasis> is proper. 
+Make sure the <emphasis role="strong">version number</emphasis> is proper.
 It must be greater than the current package, but less than package versions in
 later distributions.  If in doubt, test it with <literal>dpkg
 --compare-versions</literal>.  Be careful not to re-use a version number that
 you have already used for a previous upload, or one that conflicts with a
 binNMU. The convention is to append
-<literal>+</literal><replaceable>codename</replaceable><literal>1</literal>, e.g.
-<literal>1:2.4.3-4+etch1</literal>, of course increasing 1 for any subsequent
+<literal>+deb</literal><replaceable>X</replaceable><literal>u1</literal> (where
+<replaceable>X</replaceable> is the major release number), e.g.
+<literal>1:2.4.3-4+deb7u1</literal>, of course increasing 1 for any subsequent
 uploads.
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Unless the upstream source has been uploaded to <literal>security.debian.org
-</literal> before (by a previous security update), build the upload <emphasis
-role="strong">with full upstream source</emphasis> (<literal>dpkg-buildpackage
--sa</literal>).  If there has been a previous upload to
-<literal>security.debian.org</literal> with the same upstream version, you may
-upload without upstream source (<literal> dpkg-buildpackage -sd</literal>).
+Unless the upstream source has been uploaded to
+<literal>security.debian.org</literal> before (by a previous security update),
+build the upload <emphasis role="strong">with full upstream source</emphasis>
+(<literal>dpkg-buildpackage -sa</literal>).  If there has been a previous
+upload to <literal>security.debian.org</literal> with the same upstream
+version, you may upload without upstream source (<literal>dpkg-buildpackage
+-sd</literal>).
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
 Be sure to use the <emphasis role="strong">exact same
-<filename>*.orig.tar.{gz,bz2}</filename></emphasis> as used in the
+<filename>*.orig.tar.{gz,bz2,xz}</filename></emphasis> as used in the
 normal archive, otherwise it is not possible to move the security fix into the
 main archives later.
 </para>
@@ -1172,8 +1182,8 @@ main archives later.
 Build the package on a <emphasis role="strong">clean system</emphasis> which only
 has packages installed from the distribution you are building for. If you do not
 have such a system yourself, you can use a debian.org machine (see
-<xref linkend="server-machines"/> ) or setup a chroot (see
-<xref linkend="pbuilder"/> and <xref linkend="debootstrap"/> ).
+<xref linkend="server-machines"/>) or setup a chroot (see
+<xref linkend="pbuilder"/> and <xref linkend="debootstrap"/>).
 </para>
 </listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
@@ -1183,14 +1193,14 @@ have such a system yourself, you can use a debian.org machine (see
 <title>Uploading the fixed package</title>
 <para>
 Do <emphasis role="strong">NOT</emphasis> upload a package to the security
-upload queue (<literal>oldstable-security</literal>, <literal>stable-security
-</literal>, etc.) without prior authorization from the security team.  If the
-package does not exactly meet the team's requirements, it will cause many 
+upload queue (on <literal>security-master.debian.org</literal>)
+without prior authorization from the security team.  If the
+package does not exactly meet the team's requirements, it will cause many
 problems and delays in dealing with the unwanted upload.
 </para>
 <para>
-Do <emphasis role="strong">NOT</emphasis> upload your fix to <literal>
-proposed-updates</literal> without coordinating with the security team.  
+Do <emphasis role="strong">NOT</emphasis> upload your fix to
+<literal>proposed-updates</literal> without coordinating with the security team.
 Packages from <literal>security.debian.org</literal> will be copied into
 the <literal>proposed-updates</literal> directory automatically.  If a package
 with the same or a higher version number is already installed into the archive,
@@ -1202,7 +1212,7 @@ instead.
 Once you have created and tested the new package and it has been approved by
 the security team, it needs to be uploaded so that it can be installed in the
 archives.  For security uploads, the place to upload to is
-<literal>ftp://security-master.debian.org/pub/SecurityUploadQueue/</literal> .
+<literal>ftp://security-master.debian.org/pub/SecurityUploadQueue/</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
 Once an upload to the security queue has been accepted, the package will
@@ -1227,7 +1237,7 @@ on <literal>&ftp-master-host;</literal>.
 </section>
 
 <section id="archive-manip">
-<title>Moving, removing, renaming, adopting, and orphaning packages</title>
+<title>Moving, removing, renaming, orphaning, adopting, and reintroducing packages</title>
 <para>
 Some archive manipulation operations are not automated in the Debian upload
 process.  These procedures should be manually followed by maintainers.  This
@@ -1237,7 +1247,7 @@ chapter gives guidelines on what to do in these cases.
 <title>Moving packages</title>
 <para>
 Sometimes a package will change its section.  For instance, a package from the
-`non-free' section might be GPL'd in a later version, in which case the package
+<literal>non-free</literal> section might be GPL'd in a later version, in which case the package
 should be moved to `main' or `contrib'.<footnote><para> See the <ulink
 url="&url-debian-policy;">Debian Policy Manual</ulink> for
 guidelines on what section a package belongs in.  </para> </footnote>
@@ -1248,7 +1258,7 @@ control information to place the package in the desired section, and re-upload
 the package (see the <ulink
 url="&url-debian-policy;">Debian Policy Manual</ulink> for
 details).  You must ensure that you include the
-<filename>.orig.tar.{gz,bz2}</filename> in your upload (even if you are not uploading
+<filename>.orig.tar.{gz,bz2,xz}</filename> in your upload (even if you are not uploading
 a new upstream version), or it will not appear in the new section together with
 the rest of the package.  If your new section is valid, it will be moved
 automatically.  If it does not, then contact the ftpmasters in order to
@@ -1259,7 +1269,7 @@ If, on the other hand, you need to change the <literal>subsection</literal>
 of one of your packages (e.g., ``devel'', ``admin''), the procedure is slightly
 different.  Correct the subsection as found in the control file of the package,
 and re-upload that.  Also, you'll need to get the override file updated, as
-described in <xref linkend="override-file"/> .
+described in <xref linkend="override-file"/>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -1268,18 +1278,18 @@ described in <xref linkend="override-file"/> .
 <para>
 If for some reason you want to completely remove a package (say, if it is an
 old compatibility library which is no longer required), you need to file a bug
-against <literal>ftp.debian.org</literal> asking that the package be removed;
+against <systemitem role="package">&ftp-debian-org;</systemitem> asking that the package be removed;
 as all bugs, this bug should normally have normal severity.
-The bug title should be in the form <literal>RM: <replaceable>package
-</replaceable> <replaceable>[architecture list]</replaceable> -- 
+The bug title should be in the form <literal>RM: <replaceable>package</replaceable>
+<replaceable>[architecture list]</replaceable> --
 <replaceable>reason</replaceable></literal>, where <replaceable>package</replaceable>
 is the package to be removed and <replaceable>reason</replaceable> is a
-short summary of the reason for the removal request. 
+short summary of the reason for the removal request.
 <replaceable>[architecture list]</replaceable> is optional and only needed
 if the removal request only applies to some architectures, not all. Note
 that the <command>reportbug</command> will create a title conforming
-to these rules when you use it to report a bug against the <literal>
-ftp.debian.org</literal> pseudo-package.
+to these rules when you use it to report a bug against the
+<systemitem role="package">&ftp-debian-org;</systemitem> pseudo-package.
 </para>
 
 <para>
@@ -1292,21 +1302,24 @@ pending removal requests.
 </para>
 
 <para>
-Note that removals can only be done for the <literal>unstable
-</literal>, <literal>experimental</literal> and <literal>stable
-</literal> distribution.  Packages are not removed from 
+Note that removals can only be done for the <literal>unstable</literal>,
+<literal>experimental</literal> and <literal>stable</literal>
+distribution.  Packages are not removed from
 <literal>testing</literal> directly.  Rather, they will be removed
 automatically after the package has been removed from
-<literal>unstable</literal> and no package in <literal>testing
-</literal> depends on it.
+<literal>unstable</literal> and no package in
+<literal>testing</literal> depends on it. (Removals from
+<literal>testing</literal> are possible though by filing a removal bug report
+against the <systemitem role="package">&release-debian-org;</systemitem>
+pseudo-package. See the section <xref linkend="removals"/>.)
 </para>
 <para>
 There is one exception when an explicit removal request is not necessary: If a
-(source or binary) package is an orphan, it will be removed semi-automatically.
-For a binary-package, this means if there is no longer any source package
-producing this binary package; if the binary package is just no longer produced
-on some architectures, a removal request is still necessary.  For a
-source-package, this means that all binary packages it refers to have been
+(source or binary) package is no longer built from source, it will be removed
+semi-automatically. For a binary-package, this means if there is no longer any
+source package producing this binary package; if the binary package is just no
+longer produced on some architectures, a removal request is still necessary. For
+source-package, this means that all binary packages it refers to have been
 taken over by another source package.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -1337,7 +1350,7 @@ the <command>apt-cache</command> program from the <systemitem
 role="package">apt</systemitem> package.  When invoked as <literal>apt-cache
 showpkg <replaceable>package</replaceable></literal>, the program will show
 details for <replaceable>package</replaceable>, including reverse depends.
-Other useful programs include <literal>apt-cache rdepends</literal>,
+Other useful programs include <command>apt-cache rdepends</command>,
 <command>apt-rdepends</command>, <command>build-rdeps</command> (in the
 <systemitem role="package">devscripts</systemitem> package) and
 <command>grep-dctrl</command>.  Removal of
@@ -1379,13 +1392,13 @@ rename their software (or you made a mistake naming your package),
 you should follow a two-step process to rename it. In the first
 step, change the <filename>debian/control</filename> file to
 reflect the new name and to replace, provide and conflict with the
-obsolete package name (see the <ulink url="&url-debian-policy;">
-Debian Policy Manual</ulink> for details).  Please note that you
+obsolete package name (see the <ulink url="&url-debian-policy;">Debian
+Policy Manual</ulink> for details).  Please note that you
 should only add a <literal>Provides</literal> relation if all
 packages depending on the obsolete package name continue to work
 after the renaming. Once you've uploaded the package and the package
-has moved into the archive, file a bug against <literal>
-ftp.debian.org</literal> asking to remove the package with the
+has moved into the archive, file a bug against <systemitem role="package">&ftp-debian-org;</systemitem>
+asking to remove the package with the
 obsolete name (see <xref linkend="removing-pkgs"/>).  Do not forget
 to properly reassign the package's bugs at the same time.
 </para>
@@ -1448,7 +1461,7 @@ information and procedures.
 It is not OK to simply take over a package that you feel is neglected — that
 would be package hijacking.  You can, of course, contact the current maintainer
 and ask them if you may take over the package.  If you have reason to believe a
-maintainer has gone AWOL (absent without leave), see <xref linkend="mia-qa"/> .
+maintainer has gone AWOL (absent without leave), see <xref linkend="mia-qa"/>.
 </para>
 <para>
 Generally, you may not take over the package without the assent of the current
@@ -1464,7 +1477,7 @@ more information).
 If you take over an old package, you probably want to be listed as the
 package's official maintainer in the bug system.  This will happen
 automatically once you upload a new version with an updated
-<literal>Maintainer:</literal> field, although it can take a few hours after
+<literal>Maintainer</literal> field, although it can take a few hours after
 the upload is done.  If you do not expect to upload a new version for a while,
 you can use <xref linkend="pkg-tracking-system"/> to get the bug reports.
 However, make sure that the old maintainer has no problem with the fact that
@@ -1472,6 +1485,55 @@ they will continue to receive the bugs during that time.
 </para>
 </section>
 
+<section id="reintroducing-pkgs">
+<title>Reintroducing packages</title>
+<para>
+Packages are often removed due to release-critical bugs, absent maintainers,
+too few users or poor quality in general. While the process of reintroduction
+is similar to the initial packaging process, you can avoid some pitfalls by
+doing some historical research first.
+</para>
+<para>
+You should check why the package was removed in the first place. This
+information can be found in the removal item in the news section of the PTS
+page for the package or by browsing the log of
+<ulink url="http://&ftp-master-host;/#removed">removals</ulink>.
+The removal bug will tell you why the package was removed and will give some
+indication of what you will need to work on in order to reintroduce the package.
+It may indicate that the best way forward is to switch to some other piece of
+software instead of reintroducing the package.
+</para>
+<para>
+It may be appropriate to contact the former maintainers to find out if
+they are working on reintroducing the package, interested in co-maintaining
+the package or interested in sponsoring the package if needed.
+</para>
+<para>
+You should do all the things required before introducing new packages
+(<xref linkend="newpackage"/>).
+</para>
+<para>
+You should base your work on the latest packaging available that is suitable.
+That might be the latest version from <literal>unstable</literal>, which will
+still be present in the <ulink url="&snap-debian-org;">snapshot archive</ulink>.
+</para>
+<para>
+The version control system used by the previous maintainer might contain useful
+changes, so it might be a good idea to have a look there.  Check if the <filename>control</filename>
+file of the previous package contained any headers linking to the version
+control system for the package and if it still exists.
+</para>
+<para>
+Package removals from <literal>unstable</literal> (not <literal>testing</literal>,
+<literal>stable</literal> or <literal>oldstable</literal>) trigger the
+closing of all bugs related to the package. You should look through all the
+closed bugs (including archived bugs) and unarchive and reopen any that were
+closed in a version ending in <literal>+rm</literal> and still apply. Any that
+no longer apply should be marked as fixed in the correct version if that is
+known.
+</para>
+</section>
+
 </section>
 
 <section id="porting">
@@ -1487,8 +1549,8 @@ Porting is the act of building Debian packages for architectures that are
 different from the original architecture of the package maintainer's binary
 package.  It is a unique and essential activity.  In fact, porters do most of
 the actual compiling of Debian packages.  For instance, when a maintainer
-uploads a (portable) source packages with binaries for the <literal>i386
-</literal> architecture, it will be built for each of the other architectures,
+uploads a (portable) source packages with binaries for the <literal>i386</literal>
+architecture, it will be built for each of the other architectures,
 amounting to &number-of-arches; more builds.
 </para>
 <section id="kind-to-porters">
@@ -1521,18 +1583,18 @@ Make sure that your <literal>Build-Depends</literal> and
 <filename>debian/control</filename> are set properly.  The best way to validate
 this is to use the <systemitem role="package">debootstrap</systemitem> package
 to create an <literal>unstable</literal> chroot environment (see <xref
-linkend="debootstrap"/> ).
+linkend="debootstrap"/>).
 Within that chrooted environment, install the <systemitem
 role="package">build-essential</systemitem> package and any package
 dependencies mentioned in <literal>Build-Depends</literal> and/or
 <literal>Build-Depends-Indep</literal>.  Finally, try building your package
 within that chrooted environment.  These steps can be automated by the use of
 the <command>pbuilder</command> program which is provided by the package of the
-same name (see <xref linkend="pbuilder"/> ).
+same name (see <xref linkend="pbuilder"/>).
 </para>
 <para>
 If you can't set up a proper chroot, <command>dpkg-depcheck</command> may be of
-assistance (see <xref linkend="dpkg-depcheck"/> ).
+assistance (see <xref linkend="dpkg-depcheck"/>).
 </para>
 <para>
 See the <ulink url="&url-debian-policy;">Debian Policy
@@ -1541,9 +1603,9 @@ Manual</ulink> for instructions on setting build dependencies.
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Don't set architecture to a value other than <literal>all</literal> or 
+Don't set architecture to a value other than <literal>all</literal> or
 <literal>any</literal> unless you really mean it.  In too many cases,
-maintainers don't follow the instructions in the <ulink 
+maintainers don't follow the instructions in the <ulink
 url="&url-debian-policy;">Debian Policy Manual</ulink>.  Setting your
 architecture to only one architecture (such as <literal>i386</literal>
 or <literal>amd64</literal>) is usually incorrect.
@@ -1592,8 +1654,8 @@ standardize on different compilers.
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Make sure your debian/rules contains separate <literal>binary-arch</literal>
-and <literal>binary-indep</literal> targets, as the Debian Policy Manual 
+Make sure your <filename>debian/rules</filename> contains separate <literal>binary-arch</literal>
+and <literal>binary-indep</literal> targets, as the Debian Policy Manual
 requires.  Make sure that both targets work independently, that is, that you
 can call the target without having called the other before.  To test this,
 try to run <command>dpkg-buildpackage -B</command>.
@@ -1623,8 +1685,8 @@ The way to invoke <command>dpkg-buildpackage</command> is as
 -m<replaceable>porter-email</replaceable></literal>.  Of course, set
 <replaceable>porter-email</replaceable> to your email address.  This will do a
 binary-only build of only the architecture-dependent portions of the package,
-using the <literal>binary-arch</literal> target in <filename>debian/rules
-</filename>.
+using the <literal>binary-arch</literal> target in
+<filename>debian/rules</filename>.
 </para>
 <para>
 If you are working on a Debian machine for your porting efforts and you need to
@@ -1638,7 +1700,7 @@ it signed conveniently, or use the remote signing mode of
 <para>
 Sometimes the initial porter upload is problematic because the environment in
 which the package was built was not good enough (outdated or obsolete library,
-bad compiler, ...).  Then you may just need to recompile it in an updated
+bad compiler, etc.).  Then you may just need to recompile it in an updated
 environment.  However, you have to bump the version number in this case, so
 that the old bad package can be replaced in the Debian archive
 (<command>dak</command> refuses to install new packages if they don't have a
@@ -1648,8 +1710,7 @@ version number greater than the currently available one).
 You have to make sure that your binary-only NMU doesn't render the package
 uninstallable.  This could happen when a source package generates
 arch-dependent and arch-independent packages that have inter-dependencies
-generated using dpkg's substitution variable <literal>$(Source-Version)
-</literal>.
+generated using dpkg's substitution variable <literal>$(Source-Version)</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
 Despite the required modification of the changelog, these are called
@@ -1665,14 +1726,14 @@ source code).
 </para>
 <para>
 The ``magic'' for a recompilation-only NMU is triggered by using a suffix
-appended to the package version number, following the form <literal>
-b<replaceable>number</replaceable></literal>.
+appended to the package version number, following the form
+<literal>b<replaceable>number</replaceable></literal>.
 For instance, if the latest version you are recompiling against was version
-<literal>2.9-3</literal>, your binary-only NMU should carry a version of 
-<literal>2.9-3+b1</literal>.  If the latest version was <literal>3.4+b1
-</literal> (i.e, a native package with a previous recompilation NMU), your
-binary-only NMU should have a version number of <literal>3.4+b2</literal>.
-<footnote><para> In the past, such NMUs used the third-level number on the 
+<literal>2.9-3</literal>, your binary-only NMU should carry a version of
+<literal>2.9-3+b1</literal>.  If the latest version was <literal>3.4+b1</literal>
+(i.e, a native package with a previous recompilation NMU), your
+binary-only NMU should have a version number of <literal>3.4+b2</literal>.<footnote><para>
+In the past, such NMUs used the third-level number on the
 Debian part of the revision to denote their recompilation-only status;
 however, this syntax was ambiguous with native packages and did not allow
 proper ordering of recompile-only NMUs, source NMUs, and security NMUs on
@@ -1690,7 +1751,7 @@ to only build the architecture-dependent parts of the package.
 <title>When to do a source NMU if you are a porter</title>
 <para>
 Porters doing a source NMU generally follow the guidelines found in <xref
-linkend="nmu"/> , just like non-porters.  However, it is expected that the wait
+linkend="nmu"/>, just like non-porters.  However, it is expected that the wait
 cycle for a porter's source NMU is smaller than for a non-porter, since porters
 have to cope with a large quantity of packages.  Again, the situation varies
 depending on the distribution they are uploading to.  It also varies whether
@@ -1698,7 +1759,7 @@ the architecture is a candidate for inclusion into the next stable release; the
 release managers decide and announce which architectures are candidates.
 </para>
 <para>
-If you are a porter doing an NMU for <literal>unstable</literal>, the above 
+If you are a porter doing an NMU for <literal>unstable</literal>, the above
 guidelines for porting should be followed, with two variations.  Firstly, the
 acceptable waiting period — the time between when the bug is submitted to
 the BTS and when it is OK to do an NMU — is seven days for porters working
@@ -1706,13 +1767,13 @@ on the <literal>unstable</literal> distribution.  This period can be shortened
 if the problem is critical and imposes hardship on the porting effort, at the
 discretion of the porter group.  (Remember, none of this is Policy, just
 mutually agreed upon guidelines.) For uploads to <literal>stable</literal> or
-<literal>testing </literal>, please coordinate with the appropriate release
+<literal>testing</literal>, please coordinate with the appropriate release
 team first.
 </para>
 <para>
 Secondly, porters doing source NMUs should make sure that the bug they submit
 to the BTS should be of severity <literal>serious</literal> or greater.  This
-ensures that a single source package can be used to compile every supported 
+ensures that a single source package can be used to compile every supported
 Debian architecture by release time.  It is very important that we have one
 version of the binary and source package for all architectures in order to
 comply with many licenses.
@@ -1760,7 +1821,7 @@ with the porters.
 <title>Porter tools</title>
 <para>
 Descriptions of several porting tools can be found in <xref
-linkend="tools-porting"/> .
+linkend="tools-porting"/>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -1769,23 +1830,23 @@ linkend="tools-porting"/> .
 <para>
 The <systemitem role="package">wanna-build</systemitem> system is used as a
 distributed, client-server build distribution system.  It is usually used in
-conjunction with build daemons running the <systemitem role="package">buildd
-</systemitem> program. <literal>Build daemons</literal> are ``slave'' hosts
-which contact the central <systemitem role="package"> wanna-build</systemitem>
+conjunction with build daemons running the <systemitem role="package">buildd</systemitem>
+program. <literal>Build daemons</literal> are ``slave'' hosts
+which contact the central <systemitem role="package">wanna-build</systemitem>
 system to receive a list of packages that need to be built.
 </para>
 <para>
 <systemitem role="package">wanna-build</systemitem> is not yet available as a
 package; however, all Debian porting efforts are using it for automated
 package building.  The tool used to do the actual package builds, <systemitem
-role="package">sbuild</systemitem> is available as a package, see its 
-description in <xref linkend="sbuild"/> .  Please note that the packaged
+role="package">sbuild</systemitem> is available as a package, see its
+description in <xref linkend="sbuild"/>.  Please note that the packaged
 version is not the same as the one used on build daemons, but it is close
-enough to reproduce problems. 
+enough to reproduce problems.
 </para>
 <para>
-Most of the data produced by <systemitem role="package">wanna-build
-</systemitem> which is generally useful to porters is available on the
+Most of the data produced by <systemitem role="package">wanna-build</systemitem>
+which is generally useful to porters is available on the
 web at <ulink url="&url-buildd;"></ulink>.  This data includes nightly
 updated statistics, queueing information and logs for build attempts.
 </para>
@@ -1845,7 +1906,7 @@ fail also, and indicate this to a human reader without actually trying.
 <listitem>
 <para>
 In order to prevent autobuilders from needlessly trying to build your package,
-it must be included in <filename>packages-arch-specific</filename>, a list used
+it must be included in <filename>Packages-arch-specific</filename>, a list used
 by the <command>wanna-build</command> script.  The current version is available
 as <ulink url="&url-buildd-p-a-s;"/>;
 please see the top of the file for whom to contact for changes.
@@ -1854,15 +1915,44 @@ please see the top of the file for whom to contact for changes.
 </itemizedlist>
 <para>
 Please note that it is insufficient to only add your package to
-Packages-arch-specific without making it fail to build on unsupported
+<filename>Packages-arch-specific</filename> without making it fail to build on unsupported
 architectures: A porter or any other person trying to build your package might
 accidently upload it without noticing it doesn't work.  If in the past some
 binary packages were uploaded on unsupported architectures, request their
 removal by filing a bug against <systemitem
-role="package">ftp.debian.org</systemitem>
+role="package">ftp.debian.org</systemitem>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
+<section id="non-free-buildd">
+<title>Marking non-free packages as auto-buildable</title>
+<para>
+By default packages from the <literal>non-free</literal> section are not built by the autobuilder
+network (mostly because the license of the packages could disapprove).
+To enable a package to be build you need to perform the following
+steps:
+</para>
+<orderedlist numeration="arabic">
+<listitem>
+<para>
+Check whether it is legally allowed and technically possible
+to auto-build the package;
+</para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+<para>
+Add <literal>XS-Autobuild: yes</literal> into the header part
+of <filename>debian/control</filename>;
+</para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+<para>
+Send an email to &email-nonfree-release; and explain why the
+package can legitimately and technically be auto-built.
+</para>
+</listitem>
+</orderedlist>
+</section>
 </section>
 
 <section id="nmu">
@@ -1916,11 +2006,11 @@ maintainer by other means (private email, IRC).
 <listitem>
 <para>
 If the maintainer is usually active and responsive, have you tried to contact
-him? In general it should be considered preferable that a maintainer takes care
-of an issue himself and that he is given the chance to review and correct your
-patch, because he can be expected to be more aware of potential issues which an
-NMUer might miss. It is often a better use of everyone's time if the maintainer
-is given an opportunity to upload a fix on their own.
+them? In general it should be considered preferable that maintainers take care
+of an issue themselves and that they are given the chance to review and
+correct your patch, because they can be expected to be more aware of potential
+issues which an NMUer might miss. It is often a better use of everyone's time
+if the maintainer is given an opportunity to upload a fix on their own.
 </para>
 </listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
@@ -1928,16 +2018,16 @@ is given an opportunity to upload a fix on their own.
 When doing an NMU, you must first make sure that your intention to NMU is
 clear.  Then, you must send a patch with the differences between the
 current package and your proposed NMU to the BTS. The
-<literal>nmudiff</literal> script in the <literal>devscripts</literal> package
+<command>nmudiff</command> script in the <systemitem role="package">devscripts</systemitem> package
 might be helpful.
 </para>
 <para>
 While preparing the patch, you should better be aware of any package-specific
-practices that the maintainer might be using. Taking them into account reduces
-the burden of getting your changes integrated back in the normal package
-workflow and thus increases the possibilities that that will happen. A good
+practices that the maintainer might be using. Taking them into account
+reduces the burden of integrating your changes into the normal package
+workflow and thus increases the chances that integration will happen. A good
 place where to look for for possible package-specific practices is
-<ulink url="&url-debian-policy;ch-source.html#s-readmesource"><literal>debian/README.source</literal></ulink>.
+<ulink url="&url-debian-policy;ch-source.html#s-readmesource"><filename>debian/README.source</filename></ulink>.
 </para>
 <para>
 Unless you have an excellent reason not to do so, you must then give some time
@@ -1947,6 +2037,11 @@ to the maintainer to react (for example, by uploading to the
 <itemizedlist>
 <listitem>
 <para>
+Upload fixing only release-critical bugs older than 7 days, with no maintainer activity on the bug for 7 days and no indication that a fix is in progress: 0 days
+</para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+<para>
 Upload fixing only release-critical bugs older than 7 days: 2 days
 </para>
 </listitem>
@@ -1995,10 +2090,10 @@ defend the wisdom of any NMU you perform on its own merits.
 </section>
 
 <section id="nmu-changelog">
-<title>NMUs and debian/changelog</title>
+<title>NMUs and <filename>debian/changelog</filename></title>
 <para>
 Just like any other (source) upload, NMUs must add an entry to
-<literal>debian/changelog</literal>, telling what has changed with this
+<filename>debian/changelog</filename>, telling what has changed with this
 upload.  The first line of this entry must explicitely mention that this upload is an NMU, e.g.:
 </para>
 <screen>
@@ -2009,7 +2104,7 @@ upload.  The first line of this entry must explicitely mention that this upload
 The way to version NMUs differs for native and non-native packages.
 </para>
 <para>
-If the package is a native package (without a debian revision in the version number), 
+If the package is a native package (without a Debian revision in the version number),
 the version must be the version of the last maintainer upload, plus
 <literal>+nmu<replaceable>X</replaceable></literal>, where
 <replaceable>X</replaceable> is a counter starting at <literal>1</literal>.
@@ -2019,19 +2114,19 @@ if the current version is <literal>1.5</literal>, then an NMU would get
 version <literal>1.5+nmu1</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
-If the package is not a native package, you should add a minor version number
-to the debian revision part of the version number (the portion after the last
-hyphen). This extra number must start at 1.  For example,
+If the package is not a native package, you should add a minor version number
+to the Debian revision part of the version number (the portion after the last
+hyphen). This extra number must start at <literal>1</literal>.  For example,
 if the current version is <literal>1.5-2</literal>, then an NMU would get
 version <literal>1.5-2.1</literal>. If a new upstream version
-is packaged in the NMU, the debian revision is set to <literal>0</literal>, for
+is packaged in the NMU, the Debian revision is set to <literal>0</literal>, for
 example <literal>1.6-0.1</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
 In both cases, if the last upload was also an NMU, the counter should
 be increased. For example, if the current version is
 <literal>1.5+nmu3</literal> (a native package which has already been
-NMUed), the NMU would get version <literal>1.5+nmu4</literal>.  .
+NMUed), the NMU would get version <literal>1.5+nmu4</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
 A special versioning scheme is needed to avoid disrupting the maintainer's
@@ -2042,26 +2137,17 @@ It also has the
 benefit of making it visually clear that a package in the archive was not made
 by the official maintainer.
 </para>
-
 <para>
 If you upload a package to testing or stable, you sometimes need to "fork" the
 version number tree. This is the case for security uploads, for example.  For
 this, a version of the form
-<literal>+deb<replaceable>XY</replaceable>u<replaceable>Z</replaceable></literal>
-should be used, where <replaceable>X</replaceable> and
-<replaceable>Y</replaceable> are the major and minor release numbers, and
-<replaceable>Z</replaceable> is a counter starting at <literal>1</literal>.
-When the release number is not yet known (often the case for
-<literal>testing</literal>, at the beginning of release cycles), the lowest
-release number higher than the last stable release number must be used.  For
-example, while Etch (Debian 4.0) is stable, a security NMU to stable for a
-package at version <literal>1.5-3</literal> would have version
-<literal>1.5-3+deb40u1</literal>, whereas a security NMU to Lenny would get
-version <literal>1.5-3+deb50u1</literal>. After the release of Lenny, security
-uploads to the <literal>testing</literal> distribution will be versioned
-<literal>+deb51uZ</literal>, until it is known whether that release will be
-Debian 5.1 or Debian 6.0 (if that becomes the case, uploads will be versioned
-as <literal>+deb60uZ</literal>.
+<literal>+deb<replaceable>X</replaceable>u<replaceable>Y</replaceable></literal>
+should be used, where <replaceable>X</replaceable> is the major release number,
+and <replaceable>Y</replaceable> is a counter starting at <literal>1</literal>.
+For example, while Wheezy (Debian 7.0) is stable, a security NMU to stable for
+a package at version <literal>1.5-3</literal> would have version
+<literal>1.5-3+deb7u1</literal>, whereas a security NMU to Jessie would get
+version <literal>1.5-3+deb8u1</literal>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -2077,7 +2163,7 @@ allows the developer doing the NMU to perform all the necessary tasks at the
 same time. For instance, instead of telling the maintainer that you will
 upload the updated
 package in 7 days, you should upload the package to
-<literal>DELAYED/7</literal> and tell the maintainer that he has 7 days to
+<literal>DELAYED/7</literal> and tell the maintainer that they have 7 days to
 react.  During this time, the maintainer can ask you to delay the upload some
 more, or cancel your upload.
 </para>
@@ -2086,12 +2172,12 @@ more, or cancel your upload.
 The <literal>DELAYED</literal> queue should not be used to put additional
 pressure on the maintainer. In particular, it's important that you are
 available to cancel or delay the upload before the delay expires since the
-maintainer cannot cancel the upload himself.
+maintainer cannot cancel the upload themselves.
 </para>
 
 <para>
 If you make an NMU to <literal>DELAYED</literal> and the maintainer updates
-his package before the delay expires, your upload will be rejected because a
+the package before the delay expires, your upload will be rejected because a
 newer version is already available in the archive.
 Ideally, the maintainer will take care to include your proposed changes (or
 at least a solution for the problems they address) in that upload.
@@ -2138,7 +2224,7 @@ package is used.
 
 <para>
 BinNMUs are usually triggered on the buildds by wanna-build.
-An entry is added to debian/changelog,
+An entry is added to <filename>debian/changelog</filename>,
 explaining why the upload was needed and increasing the version number as
 described in <xref linkend="binary-only-nmu"/>.
 This entry should not be included in the next upload.
@@ -2147,7 +2233,7 @@ This entry should not be included in the next upload.
 <para>
 Buildds upload packages for their architecture to the archive as binary-only
 uploads.  Strictly speaking, these are binNMUs.  However, they are not normally
-called NMU, and they don't add an entry to debian/changelog.
+called NMU, and they don't add an entry to <filename>debian/changelog</filename>.
 </para>
 
 </section>
@@ -2165,8 +2251,8 @@ uploads are uploads of orphaned packages.
 <para>
 QA uploads are very much like normal maintainer uploads: they may fix anything,
 even minor issues; the version numbering is normal, and there is no need to use
-a delayed upload.  The difference is that you are not listed as the Maintainer
-or Uploader for the package.  Also, the changelog entry of a QA upload has a
+a delayed upload.  The difference is that you are not listed as the <literal>Maintainer</literal>
+or <literal>Uploader</literal> for the package.  Also, the changelog entry of a QA upload has a
 special first line:
 </para>
 
@@ -2199,14 +2285,18 @@ the new version (see <xref linkend="adopting"/>).
 
 <para>
 Sometimes you are fixing and/or updating a package because you are member of a
-packaging team (which uses a mailing list as Maintainer or Uploader, see <xref
-linkend="collaborative-maint"/>) but you don't want to add yourself to Uploaders
+packaging team (which uses a mailing list as <literal>Maintainer</literal> or <literal>Uploader</literal>, see <xref
+linkend="collaborative-maint"/>) but you don't want to add yourself to <literal>Uploaders</literal>
 because you do not plan to contribute regularly to this specific package. If it
 conforms with your team's policy, you can perform a normal upload without
-being listed directly as Maintainer or Uploader. In that case, you should
-start your changelog entry with the following line: <code> * Team upload.</code>.
+being listed directly as <literal>Maintainer</literal> or <literal>Uploader</literal>. In that case, you should
+start your changelog entry with the following line:
 </para>
 
+<screen>
+ * Team upload.
+</screen>
+
 </section>
 
 </section>
@@ -2218,7 +2308,7 @@ Collaborative maintenance is a term describing the sharing of Debian package
 maintenance duties by several people.  This collaboration is almost always a
 good idea, since it generally results in higher quality and faster bug fix
 turnaround times.  It is strongly recommended that packages with a priority of
-<literal>Standard</literal> or which are part of the base set have
+<literal>standard</literal> or which are part of the base set have
 co-maintainers.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -2238,8 +2328,8 @@ easy:
 <para>
 Setup the co-maintainer with access to the sources you build the package from.
 Generally this implies you are using a network-capable version control system,
-such as <command>CVS</command> or <command>Subversion</command>.  Alioth (see
-<xref linkend="alioth"/> ) provides such tools, amongst others.
+such as <literal>CVS</literal> or <literal>Subversion</literal>.  Alioth (see
+<xref linkend="alioth"/>) provides such tools, amongst others.
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
@@ -2254,7 +2344,7 @@ Uploaders: John Buzz &lt;jbuzz@debian.org&gt;, Adam Rex &lt;arex@debian.org&gt;
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Using the PTS (<xref linkend="pkg-tracking-system"/> ), the co-maintainers
+Using the PTS (<xref linkend="pkg-tracking-system"/>), the co-maintainers
 should subscribe themselves to the appropriate source package.
 </para>
 </listitem>
@@ -2262,21 +2352,21 @@ should subscribe themselves to the appropriate source package.
 <para>
 Another form of collaborative maintenance is team maintenance, which is
 recommended if you maintain several packages with the same group of developers.
-In that case, the Maintainer and Uploaders field of each package must be
+In that case, the <literal>Maintainer</literal> and <literal>Uploaders</literal> field of each package must be
 managed with care.  It is recommended to choose between one of the two
 following schemes:
 </para>
 <orderedlist numeration="arabic">
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Put the team member mainly responsible for the package in the Maintainer field.
-In the Uploaders, put the mailing list address, and the team members who care
+Put the team member mainly responsible for the package in the <literal>Maintainer</literal> field.
+In the <literal>Uploaders</literal>, put the mailing list address, and the team members who care
 for the package.
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
-Put the mailing list address in the Maintainer field.  In the Uploaders field,
+Put the mailing list address in the <literal>Maintainer</literal> field.  In the <literal>Uploaders</literal> field,
 put the team members who care for the package.  In this case, you must make
 sure the mailing list accept bug reports without any human interaction (like
 moderation for non-subscribers).
@@ -2286,14 +2376,14 @@ moderation for non-subscribers).
 
 <para>
 In any case, it is a bad idea to automatically put all team members in the
-Uploaders field. It clutters the Developer's Package Overview listing (see
-<xref linkend="ddpo"/> ) with packages one doesn't really care for, and creates
+<literal>Uploaders</literal> field. It clutters the Developer's Package Overview listing (see
+<xref linkend="ddpo"/>) with packages one doesn't really care for, and creates
 a false sense of good maintenance. For the same reason, team members do
-not need to add themselves to the Uploaders field just because they are
+not need to add themselves to the <literal>Uploaders</literal> field just because they are
 uploading the package once, they can do a “Team upload” (see <xref
-linkend="nmu-team-upload"/>). Conversely, it it a bad idea to keep a
-package with only the mailing list address as a Maintainer and no
-Uploaders.
+linkend="nmu-team-upload"/>). Conversely, it is a bad idea to keep a
+package with only the mailing list address as a <literal>Maintainer</literal> and no
+<literal>Uploaders</literal>.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -2309,8 +2399,8 @@ after they have undergone some degree of <literal>testing</literal> in
 <para>
 They must be in sync on all architectures and mustn't have dependencies that
 make them uninstallable; they also have to have generally no known
-release-critical bugs at the time they're installed into <literal>testing
-</literal>.  This way, <literal>testing</literal> should always be close to
+release-critical bugs at the time they're installed into <literal>testing</literal>.
+This way, <literal>testing</literal> should always be close to
 being a release candidate.  Please see below for details.
 </para>
 </section>
@@ -2335,22 +2425,20 @@ the following:
 The package must have been available in <literal>unstable</literal> for 2, 5
 or 10 days, depending on the urgency (high, medium or low).  Please note that
 the urgency is sticky, meaning that the highest urgency uploaded since the
-previous <literal>testing</literal> transition is taken into account.  Those
-delays may be doubled during a freeze, or <literal>testing</literal> 
-transitions may be switched off altogether;
+previous <literal>testing</literal> transition is taken into account;
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
 It must not have new release-critical bugs (RC bugs affecting the version
-available in <literal>unstable</literal>, but not affecting the version in 
+available in <literal>unstable</literal>, but not affecting the version in
 <literal>testing</literal>);
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
 <para>
 It must be available on all architectures on which it has previously been built
-in <literal>unstable</literal>.  <xref linkend="dak-ls"/> may be of interest
+in <literal>unstable</literal>. <link linkend="dak-ls">dak ls</link> may be of interest
 to check that information;
 </para>
 </listitem>
@@ -2368,6 +2456,12 @@ The packages on which it depends must either be available in
 all the necessary criteria);
 </para>
 </listitem>
+<listitem>
+<para>
+The phase of the project.  I.e. automatic transitions are turned off during
+the <emphasis>freeze</emphasis> of the <literal>testing</literal> distribution.
+</para>
+</listitem>
 </itemizedlist>
 <para>
 To find out whether a package is progressing into <literal>testing</literal>
@@ -2389,7 +2483,7 @@ more information about the usual problems which may be causing such troubles.
 </para>
 <para>
 Sometimes, some packages never enter <literal>testing</literal> because the
-set of inter-relationship is too complicated and cannot be sorted out by the
+set of interrelationship is too complicated and cannot be sorted out by the
 scripts.  See below for details.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -2398,14 +2492,14 @@ url="http://release.debian.org/migration/"></ulink> — but be warned, this page
 shows build dependencies which are not considered by britney.
 </para>
 <section id="outdated">
-<title>out-of-date</title>
+<title>Out-of-date</title>
 <para>
 <!-- FIXME: better rename this file than document rampant professionalism? -->
 For the <literal>testing</literal> migration script, outdated means: There are
 different versions in <literal>unstable</literal> for the release architectures
 (except for the architectures in fuckedarches; fuckedarches is a list of
 architectures that don't keep up (in <filename>update_out.py</filename>), but
-currently, it's empty).  outdated has nothing whatsoever to do with the 
+currently, it's empty).  outdated has nothing whatsoever to do with the
 architectures this package has in <literal>testing</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -2435,10 +2529,10 @@ Consider this example:
 </tgroup>
 </informaltable>
 <para>
-The package is out of date on alpha in <literal>unstable</literal>, and will
+The package is out of date on <literal>alpha</literal> in <literal>unstable</literal>, and will
 not go to <literal>testing</literal>. Removing the package would not help at all, the
-package is still out of date on <literal>alpha</literal>, and will not 
-propagate to testing.
+package is still out of date on <literal>alpha</literal>, and will not
+propagate to <literal>testing</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
 However, if ftp-master removes a package in <literal>unstable</literal> (here
@@ -2472,7 +2566,7 @@ on <literal>arm</literal>):
 </informaltable>
 <para>
 In this case, the package is up to date on all release architectures in
-<literal>unstable</literal> (and the extra <literal>hurd-i386</literal> 
+<literal>unstable</literal> (and the extra <literal>hurd-i386</literal>
 doesn't matter, as it's not a release architecture).
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -2492,8 +2586,8 @@ with the new version of <literal>b</literal>; then <literal>a</literal> may
 be removed to allow <literal>b</literal> in.
 </para>
 <para>
-Of course, there is another reason to remove a package from <literal>testing
-</literal>: It's just too buggy (and having a single RC-bug is enough to be
+Of course, there is another reason to remove a package from <literal>testing</literal>:
+It's just too buggy (and having a single RC-bug is enough to be
 in this state).
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -2504,7 +2598,7 @@ will automatically be removed.
 </section>
 
 <section id="circular">
-<title>circular dependencies</title>
+<title>Circular dependencies</title>
 <para>
 A situation which is not handled very well by britney is if package
 <literal>a</literal> depends on the new version of package
@@ -2548,28 +2642,28 @@ happens to one of your packages.
 </section>
 
 <section id="s5.13.2.4">
-<title>influence of package in testing</title>
+<title>Influence of package in testing</title>
 <para>
-Generally, there is nothing that the status of a package in <literal>testing
-</literal> means for transition of the next version from <literal>unstable
-</literal> to <literal>testing</literal>, with two exceptions:
+Generally, there is nothing that the status of a package in <literal>testing</literal>
+means for transition of the next version from <literal>unstable</literal>
+to <literal>testing</literal>, with two exceptions:
 If the RC-bugginess of the package goes down, it may go in even if it is still
-RC-buggy.  The second exception is if the version of the package in <literal>
-testing</literal> is out of sync on the different arches: Then any arch might
+RC-buggy.  The second exception is if the version of the package in
+<literal>testing</literal> is out of sync on the different arches: Then any arch might
 just upgrade to the version of the source package; however, this can happen
 only if the package was previously forced through, the arch is in fuckedarches,
-or there was no binary package of that arch present in <literal>unstable
-</literal> at all during the <literal>testing</literal> migration.
+or there was no binary package of that arch present in <literal>unstable</literal>
+at all during the <literal>testing</literal> migration.
 </para>
 <para>
-In summary this means: The only influence that a package being in <literal>
-testing</literal> has on a new version of the same package is that the new
+In summary this means: The only influence that a package being in
+<literal>testing</literal> has on a new version of the same package is that the new
 version might go in easier.
 </para>
 </section>
 
 <section id="details">
-<title>details</title>
+<title>Details</title>
 <para>
 If you are interested in details, this is how britney works:
 </para>
@@ -2577,14 +2671,12 @@ If you are interested in details, this is how britney works:
 The packages are looked at to determine whether they are valid candidates.
 This gives the update excuses.  The most common reasons why a package is not
 considered are too young, RC-bugginess, and out of date on some arches.  For
-this part of britney, the release managers have hammers of various sizes to
-force britney to consider a package.  (Also, the base freeze is coded in that
-part of britney.) (There is a similar thing for binary-only updates, but this
-is not described here.  If you're interested in that, please peruse the code.)
+this part of britney, the release managers have hammers of various sizes,
+called hints (see below), to force britney to consider a package.
 </para>
 <para>
-Now, the more complex part happens: Britney tries to update <literal>testing
-</literal> with the valid candidates. For that, britney tries to add each
+Now, the more complex part happens: Britney tries to update <literal>testing</literal>
+with the valid candidates. For that, britney tries to add each
 valid candidate to the testing distribution. If the number of uninstallable
 packages in <literal>testing</literal> doesn't increase, the package is
 accepted. From that point on, the accepted package is considered to be part
@@ -2593,15 +2685,18 @@ tests include this package.  Hints from the release team are processed
 before or after this main run, depending on the exact type.
 </para>
 <para>
-If you want to see more details, you can look it up on
-<filename>merkel:/org/&ftp-debian-org;/testing/update_out/</filename> (or
-in <filename>merkel:~aba/testing/update_out</filename> to see a setup with
-a smaller packages file).  Via web, it's at <ulink
-url="http://&ftp-master-host;/testing/update_out_code/"></ulink>
+If you want to see more details, you can look it up on <ulink
+url="http://&ftp-master-host;/testing/update_output/"></ulink>.
 </para>
 <para>
 The hints are available via <ulink
-url="http://&ftp-master-host;/testing/hints/"></ulink>.
+url="http://&ftp-master-host;/testing/hints/"></ulink>, where you can find
+the
+<ulink url="http://&ftp-master-host;/testing/hints/README">description</ulink>
+as well.  With the hints, the Debian Release team can block or unblock
+packages, ease or force packages into <literal>testing</literal>, remove
+packages from <literal>testing</literal>, approve uploads to
+<link linkend="t-p-u">testing-proposed-updates</link> or override the urgency.
 </para>
 </section>
 
@@ -2610,11 +2705,11 @@ url="http://&ftp-master-host;/testing/hints/"></ulink>.
 <section id="t-p-u">
 <title>Direct updates to testing</title>
 <para>
-The <literal>testing</literal> distribution is fed with packages from 
+The <literal>testing</literal> distribution is fed with packages from
 <literal>unstable</literal> according to the rules explained above.  However,
-in some cases, it is necessary to upload packages built only for <literal>
-testing</literal>.  For that, you may want to upload to <literal>
-testing-proposed-updates</literal>.
+in some cases, it is necessary to upload packages built only for
+<literal>testing</literal>.  For that, you may want to upload to
+<literal>testing-proposed-updates</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
 Keep in mind that packages uploaded there are not automatically processed, they
@@ -2626,17 +2721,17 @@ give on &email-debian-devel-announce;.
 <para>
 You should not upload to <literal>testing-proposed-updates</literal> when you
 can update your packages through <literal>unstable</literal>.  If you can't
-(for example because you have a newer development version in <literal>unstable
-</literal>), you may use this facility, but it is recommended that you ask for
+(for example because you have a newer development version in <literal>unstable</literal>),
+you may use this facility, but it is recommended that you ask for
 authorization from the release manager first.  Even if a package is frozen,
 updates through <literal>unstable</literal> are possible, if the upload via
 <literal>unstable</literal> does not pull in any new dependencies.
 </para>
 <para>
-Version numbers are usually selected by adding the codename of the 
-<literal>testing</literal> distribution and a running number, like 
-<literal>1.2sarge1</literal> for the first upload through
-<literal>testing-proposed-updates</literal> of package version 
+Version numbers are usually selected by adding the codename of the
+<literal>testing</literal> distribution and a running number, like
+<literal>1.2squeeze1</literal> for the first upload through
+<literal>testing-proposed-updates</literal> of package version
 <literal>1.2</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
@@ -2646,8 +2741,8 @@ Please make sure you didn't miss any of these items in your upload:
 <listitem>
 <para>
 Make sure that your package really needs to go through
-<literal>testing-proposed-updates</literal>, and can't go through <literal>
-unstable</literal>;
+<literal>testing-proposed-updates</literal>, and can't go through
+<literal>unstable</literal>;
 </para>
 </listitem>
 <listitem>
@@ -2700,14 +2795,14 @@ currently, these are <literal>critical</literal>, <literal>grave</literal> and
 <para>
 Such bugs are presumed to have an impact on the chances that the package will
 be released with the <literal>stable</literal> release of Debian: in general,
-if a package has open release-critical bugs filed on it, it won't get into 
-<literal>testing</literal>, and consequently won't be released in <literal>
-stable</literal>.
+if a package has open release-critical bugs filed on it, it won't get into
+<literal>testing</literal>, and consequently won't be released in
+<literal>stable</literal>.
 </para>
 <para>
 The <literal>unstable</literal> bug count are all release-critical bugs which
-are marked to apply to <replaceable>package</replaceable>/<replaceable>version
-</replaceable> combinations that are available in unstable for a release
+are marked to apply to <replaceable>package</replaceable>/<replaceable>version</replaceable>
+combinations that are available in unstable for a release
 architecture. The <literal>testing</literal> bug count is defined analogously.
 </para>
 </section>
@@ -2719,13 +2814,13 @@ break other packages?</title>
 The structure of the distribution archives is such that they can only contain
 one version of a package; a package is defined by its name.  So when the source
 package <literal>acmefoo</literal> is installed into <literal>testing</literal>,
-along with its binary packages <literal>acme-foo-bin</literal>, <literal>
-acme-bar-bin</literal>, <literal>libacme-foo1</literal> and <literal>
-libacme-foo-dev</literal>, the old version is removed.
+along with its binary packages <literal>acme-foo-bin</literal>,
+<literal>acme-bar-bin</literal>, <literal>libacme-foo1</literal> and
+<literal>libacme-foo-dev</literal>, the old version is removed.
 </para>
 <para>
 However, the old version may have provided a binary package with an old soname
-of a library, such as <literal>libacme-foo0</literal>.  Removing the old 
+of a library, such as <literal>libacme-foo0</literal>.  Removing the old
 <literal>acmefoo</literal> will remove <literal>libacme-foo0</literal>, which
 will break any packages which depend on it.
 </para>