chiark / gitweb /
changelog: Gardening
[dgit.git] / dgit-user.7.pod
index d27cd93..d341605 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ system
 as if your distro used git to maintain all of it.
 
 You can then edit it,
 as if your distro used git to maintain all of it.
 
 You can then edit it,
-build updated binary packages
+build updated binary packages (.debs)
 and install and run them.
 You can also share your work with others.
 
 and install and run them.
 You can also share your work with others.
 
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ or L<dgit(1)> and L<dgit(7)>.
 
 =over 4
 
 
 =over 4
 
-    % dgit clone glibc jessie
+    % dgit clone glibc jessie,-security
     % cd glibc
     % wget 'https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=28250;mbox=yes;msg=89' | patch -p1 -u
     % git commit -a -m 'Fix libc lost output bug'
     % cd glibc
     % wget 'https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=28250;mbox=yes;msg=89' | patch -p1 -u
     % git commit -a -m 'Fix libc lost output bug'
@@ -72,7 +72,8 @@ Later:
 =back
 
 dgit clone needs to be told the source package name
 =back
 
 dgit clone needs to be told the source package name
-(which might be different to the binary package name)
+(which might be different to the binary package name,
+which was the name you passed to "apt-get install")
 and the codename or alias of the Debian release
 (this is called the "suite").
 
 and the codename or alias of the Debian release
 (this is called the "suite").
 
@@ -169,7 +170,8 @@ from dgitish git branches.
 
 (For Debian afficionados:
 the git trees that come out of dgit are
 
 (For Debian afficionados:
 the git trees that come out of dgit are
-"patches-applied packaging branches".)
+"patches-applied packaging branches
+without a .pc directory".)
 
 =head2 What kind of history you get
 
 
 =head2 What kind of history you get
 
@@ -286,6 +288,8 @@ but not to build a source package.
 
 =head1 INSTALLING
 
 
 =head1 INSTALLING
 
+=head2 Debian Jessie or older
+
 =over 4
 
     % sudo dpkg -i ../libc6_*.deb
 =over 4
 
     % sudo dpkg -i ../libc6_*.deb
@@ -299,6 +303,14 @@ If the dependencies aren't installed,
 you will get an error, which can usually be fixed with
 C<apt-get -f install>.
 
 you will get an error, which can usually be fixed with
 C<apt-get -f install>.
 
+=head2 Debian Stretch or newer
+
+=over 4
+
+    % sudo apt install ../libc6_*.deb
+
+=back
+
 =head1 Multiarch
 
 If you're working on a library package and your system has multiple
 =head1 Multiarch
 
 If you're working on a library package and your system has multiple
@@ -354,7 +366,7 @@ The C<dgit/jessie> branch (or whatever) is a normal git branch.
 You can use C<git push> to publish it on any suitable git server.
 
 Anyone who gets that git branch from you
 You can use C<git push> to publish it on any suitable git server.
 
 Anyone who gets that git branch from you
-will be able to build binary packages
+will be able to build binary packages (.deb)
 just as you did.
 
 If you want to contribute your changes back to Debian,
 just as you did.
 
 If you want to contribute your changes back to Debian,
@@ -379,15 +391,15 @@ you need to provide a source package
 but don't care about its format/layout
 (for example because some software you have consumes source packages,
 not git histories)
 but don't care about its format/layout
 (for example because some software you have consumes source packages,
 not git histories)
-you can use this recipe to generate a C<1.0> "native"
+you can use this recipe to generate a C<3.0 (native)>
 source package, which is just a tarball
 with accompanying .dsc metadata file:
 
 =over 4
 
 source package, which is just a tarball
 with accompanying .dsc metadata file:
 
 =over 4
 
-    % git rm debian/source/version
-    % git commit -m 'switch to 1.0 source format'
-    % dgit -wgf --dpkg-buildpackage:-sn build-source
+    % echo '3.0 (native)' >debian/source/format
+    % git commit -m 'switch to native source format' debian/source/format
+    % dgit -wgf build-source
 
 =back
 
 
 =back