chiark / gitweb /
uslip: New options for flooding tripe.
[tripe] / uslip / tripe-uslip.1.in
1 .\" -*-nroff-*-
2 .\"
3 .\" Documentation for uslip
4 .\"
5 .\" (c) 2008 Straylight/Edgeware.
6 .\"
7
8 .\"----- Licensing notice ---------------------------------------------------
9 .\"
10 .\" This file is part of Trivial IP Encryption (TrIPE).
11 .\"
12 .\" TrIPE is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
13 .\" it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
14 .\" the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
15 .\" (at your option) any later version.
16 .\"
17 .\" TrIPE is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
18 .\" but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
19 .\" MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
20 .\" GNU General Public License for more details.
21 .\"
22 .\" You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
23 .\" along with TrIPE; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation,
24 .\" Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
25 .
26 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
27 .so ../defs.man.in \" @@@PRE@@@
28 .
29 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
30 .TH tripe-uslip 1 "7 April 2008" "Straylight/Edgeware" "TrIPE: Trivial IP Encryption"
31 .
32 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
33 .SH "NAME"
34 .
35 tripe-uslip \- fake SLIP interface for testing tripe
36 .
37 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
38 .SH "SYNOPSIS"
39 .
40 .B tripe-uslip
41 .RB [ \-fgps ]
42 .I socket
43 .
44 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
45 .SH "DESCRIPTION"
46 .
47 The
48 .B tripe-uslip
49 provides a mechanism for pushing packets of data into a
50 .BR tripe (8)
51 server, and extracting them.  This is useful for testing the server; it
52 isn't useful in a production environment.
53 .SS "Overview and theory of operation"
54 Testing the
55 .BR tripe (8)
56 server is difficult: configuring network interfaces and creating tunnels
57 requires root privileges (undesirable for a program under development!)
58 and testing that it successfully transports network packets needs two
59 separate instances running on separate machines.  (If both ends of a
60 tunnel are on the same host then the packets won't actually go over the
61 tunnel: the kernel will just loop them back internally.)
62 .PP
63 The
64 .B tripe-uslip
65 program implements the interface required of a dynamic allocation script
66 (see the
67 .BR tripe (8)
68 manual for details).  However, it doesn't actually make a network
69 interface.
70 .PP
71 You use it by setting
72 .IP
73 .BI TRIPE_SLIPIF= dir /tripe-uslip
74 .PP
75 in the environment passed to the
76 .BR tripe (8)
77 server (and, typically, passing it the
78 .B \-tslip
79 command-line option).  When you add a new peer with the
80 .B ADD
81 .I peer
82 .IR address ...
83 administration command, the server runs
84 .IB dir /tripe-uslip
85 .IR peer ,
86 which in turn creates a Unix-domain socket called
87 .I peer
88 in the server's current directory.  If you run
89 .IP
90 .B tripe-uslip
91 .B \-p
92 .I peer
93 .BI < file
94 .PP
95 in this directory, then the contents of
96 .I file
97 are sent to
98 .B tripe
99 as if they were a network packet to be encrypted and transmitted over
100 its tunnel.  (Any method of providing the data on standard input is
101 acceptable: it doesn't have to be a regular file.  In particular, pipes
102 are fine.  Note also that
103 .B tripe
104 doesn't actually care that the data it receives is actually network
105 packets: it can be absolutely anything you like.)
106 .PP
107 If you run
108 .IP
109 .B tripe-uslip
110 .B \-g
111 .I peer
112 .BI > file
113 .PP
114 then the contents of the next network packet the server decrypts will be
115 written to the
116 .IR file .
117 (Again, you can use pipes or whatever.)
118 .PP
119 The
120 .B tripe-uslip
121 program is fully nonblocking.  This means that you won't deadlock the
122 server by attaching duff scripts to it via
123 .BR tripe-uslip .
124 .SS "Technical details"
125 Without options,
126 .B tripe-uslip
127 performs the following actions.
128 .hP \*o
129 It creates a Unix-domain socket with name
130 .I socket
131 (which will typically be the name of the peer that
132 .BR tripe (8)
133 created this interface for).
134 .hP \*o
135 It writes the string
136 .BI tripe-uslip- socket
137 to its standard output, followed by a newline.
138 .hP \*o
139 It reads and discards up to two bytes with value 192 (SLIP
140 .BR END )
141 on stdin.
142 .hP \*o
143 It enters its main loop, during which it accepts and processes client
144 connections, and reads and writes SLIP-encoded packets on standard input
145 and output.  Unless a fatal error occurs, the main loop continues until
146 it (a) has no connected clients, (b) has no packets queued for output to
147 clients or to standard output, and (c) has seen end-of-file on its
148 standard input.
149 .PP
150 The main loop works as follows.  When a SLIP-encoded packet arrives on
151 standard input, it is decoded and placed on a queue waiting to be read
152 from a client.  If a client connects and writes a packet, the packet is
153 SLIP-encoded and written to standard output.
154 .PP
155 Clients connecting to the
156 Unix-domain socket send an initial character
157 .RB ` < '
158 to read a packet or
159 .RB ` > '
160 to write.  Packets, as far as clients are concerned, consist of
161 uninterpreted strings of octets and continue until end-of-file.  It is
162 not possible to read or write more than one packet in a single connection.
163 .PP
164 The command-line options allow
165 .B tripe-uslip
166 to be used from scripts to inject or collect packets.  They are as follows.
167 .TP
168 .B \-g, \-\-get
169 Connect to
170 .IR socket ,
171 read a packet from the socket and write it to standard output.
172 .TP
173 .B \-p, \-\-put
174 Connect to
175 .IR socket ,
176 read a packet from standard input and write it to the socket.
177 .TP
178 .B \-f, \-\-flood
179 Connect to
180 .IR socket ,
181 and send packets as fast as possible.  The packets sent aren't very
182 interesting, and there's no way to configure their contents.
183 .TP
184 .B \-s, \-\-sink
185 Connect to
186 .IR socket
187 and read packets as the become available.  The packets are discarded,
188 though if stdout is a terminal, a simple spinning-baton animation is
189 updated once for each group of packets.  If you are flooding one end of
190 a TrIPE connection, it's advisable to attach a sink to the other:
191 otherwise the destination
192 .B tripe-uslip
193 will attempt to consume all available memory, storing incoming packets
194 until someone retrieves them.
195 .
196 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
197 .SH "BUGS"
198 .
199 The
200 .B tripe-uslip
201 program is intended as a tool for testing the
202 .BR tripe (8)
203 server.  It is not expected to be useful in production environments.  In
204 particular, it intentionally imposes no limits on queue lengths or
205 packet sizes, and its internals and interface (one packet per client
206 connection) are not well-suited for high performance.  That said, the
207 flood option has worked well enough to expose bugs in
208 .BR tripe 's
209 behaviour under heavy loads.
210 .PP
211 If
212 .B tripe-uslip
213 turns out to be useful in other contexts then it might be improved.
214 Patches are, of course, welcome.
215 .PP
216 The initial ignoring of
217 .B END
218 bytes is unpleasant but necessary to cope with the
219 .BR tripe (8)
220 server, which sends this sequence in order to ensure that it's properly
221 synchronized with the SLIP interface.
222 .
223 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
224 .SH "SEE ALSO"
225 .
226 .BR tripe (8).
227 .
228 .\"--------------------------------------------------------------------------
229 .SH "AUTHOR"
230 .
231 Mark Wooding, <mdw@distorted.org.uk>
232 .
233 .\"----- That's all, folks --------------------------------------------------