chiark / gitweb /
doc/: Consistently write `rôle', rather than `role', in prose.
authorMark Wooding <mdw@distorted.org.uk>
Sat, 9 Jun 2018 02:43:41 +0000 (03:43 +0100)
committerMark Wooding <mdw@distorted.org.uk>
Sat, 9 Jun 2018 02:43:41 +0000 (03:43 +0100)
Obviously there's no diacritic in identifiers.

doc/concepts.tex

index 9cc5be7..45f76b6 100644 (file)
@@ -371,7 +371,7 @@ Keyword arguments can be provided in three ways.
 
 Keyword arguments are provided as a general feature for C functions.
 However, Sod has special support for messages which accept keyword arguments
-(\xref{sec:concepts.methods.keywords}); and they play an essential role in
+(\xref{sec:concepts.methods.keywords}); and they play an essential rôle in
 the instance construction protocol (\xref{sec:concepts.lifecycle.birth}).
 
 %%%--------------------------------------------------------------------------
@@ -407,12 +407,12 @@ A class definition may include \emph{direct methods} for messages defined by
 it or any of its superclasses.
 
 Like messages, direct methods define argument lists and return types, but
-they may also have a \emph{body}, and a \emph{role}.
+they may also have a \emph{body}, and a \emph{rôle}.
 
 A direct method need not have the same argument list or return type as its
 message.  The acceptable argument lists and return types for a method depend
 on the message, in particular its method combination
-(\xref{sec:concepts.methods.combination}), and the method's role.
+(\xref{sec:concepts.methods.combination}), and the method's rôle.
 
 A direct method body is a block of C code, and the Sod translator usually
 defines, for each direct method, a function with external linkage, whose body
@@ -430,8 +430,8 @@ the object's class and its superclasses.  These direct methods are combined
 together to form the \emph{effective method} for that particular class and
 message.  Direct methods can be combined into an effective method in
 different ways, according to the \emph{method combination} specified by the
-message.  The method combination determines which direct method roles are
-acceptable, and, for each role, the appropriate argument lists and return
+message.  The method combination determines which direct method rôles are
+acceptable, and, for each rôle, the appropriate argument lists and return
 types.
 
 One direct method, $M$, is said to be more (resp.\ less) \emph{specific} than
@@ -442,7 +442,7 @@ defining $N$.
 \subsubsection{The standard method combination}
 The default method combination is called the \emph{standard method
 combination}; other method combinations are useful occasionally for special
-effects.  The standard method combination accepts four direct method roles,
+effects.  The standard method combination accepts four direct method rôles,
 called `primary' (the default), @|before|, @|after|, and @|around|.
 
 All direct methods subject to the standard method combination must have
@@ -553,7 +553,7 @@ The effective method for a message with standard method combination works as
 follows (see also~\xref{fig:concepts.methods.stdmeth}).
 \begin{enumerate}
 
-\item If any applicable methods have the @|around| role, then the most
+\item If any applicable methods have the @|around| rôle, then the most
   specific such method, with respect to the class of the receiving object, is
   invoked.
 
@@ -577,7 +577,7 @@ follows (see also~\xref{fig:concepts.methods.stdmeth}).
   The value returned by the most specific @|around| method is the value
   returned by the effective method.
 
-\item If any applicable methods have the @|before| role, then they are all
+\item If any applicable methods have the @|before| rôle, then they are all
   invoked, starting with the most specific.
 
 \item The most specific applicable primary method is invoked.
@@ -598,7 +598,7 @@ follows (see also~\xref{fig:concepts.methods.stdmeth}).
   returned to the least specific @|around| method, which called it via its
   own @|next_method| function.
 
-\item If any applicable methods have the @|after| role, then they are all
+\item If any applicable methods have the @|after| rôle, then they are all
   invoked, starting with the \emph{least} specific.  (Hence, the most
   specific @|after| method is invoked with the most `afterness'.)
 
@@ -609,7 +609,7 @@ dynamic environment appropriately for the primary methods of its subclasses,
 e.g., by claiming a lock, and restore it afterwards.
 
 The @|next_method| function provided to methods with the primary and
-@|around| roles accepts the same arguments, and returns the same type, as the
+@|around| rôles accepts the same arguments, and returns the same type, as the
 message, except that one or two additional arguments are inserted at the
 front of the argument list.  The first additional argument is always the
 receiving object, @|me|.  If the message accepts a variable argument suffix,
@@ -619,7 +619,7 @@ second additional argument; otherwise, In the former case, a variable
 of the argument pointer (so the method body can process the variable argument
 suffix itself, and still pass a fresh copy on to the next method).
 
-A method with the primary or @|around| role may use the convenience macro
+A method with the primary or @|around| rôle may use the convenience macro
 @|CALL_NEXT_METHOD|, which takes no arguments itself, and simply calls
 @|next_method| with appropriate arguments: the receiver @|me| pointer, the
 argument pointer @|sod__master_ap| (if applicable), and the method's
@@ -639,7 +639,7 @@ specific primary method, as the standard method combination does, they invoke
 the applicable primary methods in turn and aggregate the return values from
 each.
 
-The aggregating method combinations accept the same four roles as the
+The aggregating method combinations accept the same four rôles as the
 standard method combination, and @|around|, @|before|, and @|after| methods
 work in the same way.