chiark / gitweb /
git-debrebase: introduce $claims_to_be_breakwater (nfc)
[dgit.git] / dgit-maint-merge.7.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 dgit - tutorial for package maintainers, using a workflow centered around git-merge(1)
4
5 =head1 INTRODUCTION
6
7 This document describes elements of a workflow for maintaining a
8 non-native Debian package using B<dgit>.  The workflow makes the
9 following opinionated assumptions:
10
11 =over 4
12
13 =item
14
15 Git histories should be the non-linear histories produced by
16 git-merge(1), preserving all information about divergent development
17 that was later brought together.
18
19 =item
20
21 Maintaining convenient and powerful git workflows takes priority over
22 the usefulness of the raw Debian source package.  The Debian archive
23 is thought of as an output format.
24
25 For example, we don't spend time curating a series of quilt patches.
26 However,
27 in straightforward cases,
28 the information such a series would contain is readily
29 available from B<dgit-repos>.
30
31 =item
32
33 It is more important to have the Debian package's git history be a
34 descendent of upstream's git history than to use exactly the orig.tar
35 that upstream makes available for download.
36
37 =back
38
39 This workflow is less suitable for some packages.
40 When the Debian delta contains multiple pieces which interact,
41 or which you aren't going to be able to upstream soon,
42 it might be preferable to
43 maintain the delta as a rebasing patch series.
44 For such a workflow see for example
45 dgit-maint-gbp(7).
46
47 =head1 INITIAL DEBIANISATION
48
49 This section explains how to start using this workflow with a new
50 package.  It should be skipped when converting an existing package to
51 this workflow.
52
53 =head2 When upstream tags releases in git
54
55 Suppose that the latest stable upstream release is 1.2.2, and this has
56 been tagged '1.2.2' by upstream.
57
58 =over 4
59
60     % git clone -oupstream https://some.upstream/foo.git
61     % cd foo
62     % git verify-tag 1.2.2
63     % git reset --hard 1.2.2
64     % git branch --unset-upstream
65
66 =back
67
68 The final command detaches your master branch from the upstream remote,
69 so that git doesn't try to push anything there, or merge unreleased
70 upstream commits.  If you want to maintain a copy of your packaging
71 branch on B<alioth.debian.org> in addition to B<dgit-repos>, you can
72 do something like this:
73
74 =over 4
75
76     % git remote add -f origin git.debian.org:/git/collab-maint/foo.git
77     % git push --follow-tags -u origin master
78
79 =back
80
81 Now go ahead and Debianise your package.  Just make commits on the
82 master branch, adding things in the I<debian/> directory.  If you need
83 to patch the upstream source, just make commits that change files
84 outside of the I<debian/> directory.  It is best to separate commits
85 that touch I<debian/> from commits that touch upstream source, so that
86 the latter can be cherry-picked by upstream.
87
88 Note that there is no need to maintain a separate 'upstream' branch,
89 unless you also happen to be involved in upstream development.  We
90 work with upstream tags rather than any branches, except when
91 forwarding patches (see FORWARDING PATCHES UPSTREAM, below).
92
93 Finally, you need an orig tarball:
94
95 =over 4
96
97     % git deborig
98
99 =back
100
101 See git-deborig(1) if this fails.
102
103 This tarball is ephemeral and easily regenerated, so we don't commit
104 it anywhere (e.g. with tools like pristine-tar(1)).
105
106 =head3 Verifying upstream's tarball releases
107
108 =over 4
109
110 It can be a good idea to compare upstream's released tarballs with the
111 release tags, at least for the first upload of the package.  If they
112 are different, you might need to add some additional steps to your
113 I<debian/rules>, such as running autotools.
114
115 A convenient way to perform this check is to import the tarball as
116 described in the following section, using a different value for
117 'upstream-tag', and then use git-diff(1) to compare the imported
118 tarball to the release tag.  If they are the same, you can use
119 upstream's tarball instead of running git-deborig(1).
120
121 =back
122
123 =head2 When upstream releases only tarballs
124
125 We need a virtual upstream branch with virtual release tags.
126 gbp-import-orig(1) can manage this for us.  To begin
127
128 =over 4
129
130     % mkdir foo
131     % cd foo
132     % git init
133
134 =back
135
136 Now create I<debian/gbp.conf>:
137
138 =over 4
139
140     [DEFAULT]
141     upstream-branch = upstream
142     debian-branch = master
143     upstream-tag = %(version)s
144
145     sign-tags = True
146     pristine-tar = False
147     pristine-tar-commit = False
148
149     [import-orig]
150     merge-mode = merge
151
152 =back
153
154 gbp-import-orig(1) requires a pre-existing upstream branch:
155
156 =over 4
157
158     % git add debian/gbp.conf && git commit -m "create gbp.conf"
159     % git checkout --orphan upstream
160     % git rm -rf .
161     % git commit --allow-empty -m "initial, empty branch for upstream source"
162     % git checkout -f master
163
164 =back
165
166 Then we can import the upstream version:
167
168 =over 4
169
170     % gbp import-orig --merge-mode=replace ../foo_1.2.2.orig.tar.xz
171
172 =back
173
174 Our upstream branch cannot be pushed to B<dgit-repos>, but since we
175 will need it whenever we import a new upstream version, we must push
176 it somewhere.  The usual choice is B<alioth.debian.org>:
177
178 =over 4
179
180     % git remote add -f origin git.debian.org:/git/collab-maint/foo.git
181     % git push --follow-tags -u origin master upstream
182
183 =back
184
185 You are now ready to proceed as above, making commits to both the
186 upstream source and the I<debian/> directory.
187
188 =head1 CONVERTING AN EXISTING PACKAGE
189
190 This section explains how to convert an existing Debian package to
191 this workflow.  It should be skipped when debianising a new package.
192
193 =head2 No existing git history
194
195 =over 4
196
197     % dgit clone foo
198     % cd foo
199     % git remote add -f upstream https://some.upstream/foo.git
200
201 =back
202
203 =head2 Existing git history using another workflow
204
205 First, if you don't already have the git history locally, clone it,
206 and obtain the corresponding orig.tar from the archive:
207
208 =over 4
209
210     % git clone git.debian.org:collab-maint/foo
211     % cd foo
212     % origtargz
213
214 =back
215
216 Now dump any existing patch queue:
217
218 =over 4
219
220     % git rm -rf debian/patches
221     % git commit -m "drop existing quilt patch queue"
222
223 =back
224
225 Then make new upstream tags available:
226
227 =over 4
228
229     % git remote add -f upstream https://some.upstream/foo.git
230
231 =back
232
233 =for dgit-test dpkg-source-ignores begin
234
235 Now you simply need to ensure that your git HEAD is dgit-compatible,
236 i.e., it is exactly what you would get if you ran
237 B<dpkg-buildpackage -i'(?:^|/)\.git(?:/|$)' -I.git -S>
238 and then unpacked the resultant source package.
239
240 =for dgit-test dpkg-source-ignores end
241
242 To achieve this, you might need to delete
243 I<debian/source/local-options>.  One way to have dgit check your
244 progress is to run B<dgit build-source>.
245
246 The first dgit push will require I<--overwrite>.  If this is the first
247 ever dgit push of the package, consider passing
248 I<--deliberately-not-fast-forward> instead of I<--overwrite>.  This
249 avoids introducing a new origin commit into your git history.  (This
250 origin commit would represent the most recent non-dgit upload of the
251 package, but this should already be represented in your git history.)
252
253 =head1 SOURCE PACKAGE CONFIGURATION
254
255 =head2 debian/source/options
256
257 We set some source package options such that dgit can transparently
258 handle the "dropping" and "refreshing" of changes to the upstream
259 source:
260
261 =over 4
262
263     single-debian-patch
264     auto-commit
265
266 =back
267
268 You don't need to create this file if you are using the version 1.0
269 source package format.
270
271 =head2 Sample text for debian/source/patch-header
272
273 It is a good idea to explain how a user can obtain a breakdown of the
274 changes to the upstream source:
275
276 =over 4
277
278 The Debian packaging of foo is maintained in git,
279 using the merging workflow described in dgit-maint-merge(7).
280 There isn't a patch queue that can be represented as a quilt series.
281
282 A detailed breakdown of the changes is available from their
283 canonical representation -
284 git commits in the packaging repository.
285 For example, to see the changes made by the Debian maintainer in the
286 first upload of upstream version 1.2.3, you could use:
287
288 =over 4
289
290     % git clone https://git.dgit.debian.org/foo
291     % cd foo
292     % git log --oneline 1.2.3..debian/1.2.3-1 -- . ':!debian'
293
294 =back
295
296 (If you have dgit, use `dgit clone foo`,
297 rather than plain `git clone`.)
298
299 A single combined diff, containing all the changes, follows.
300
301 =back
302
303 If you are using the version 1.0 source package format, this text
304 should be added to README.source instead.  The version 1.0 source
305 package format ignores debian/source/patch-header.
306
307 If you're using the version 3.0 (quilt) source package format, you
308 could add this text to README.source instead of
309 debian/source/patch-header, but this might distract from more
310 important information present in README.source.
311
312 =head1 BUILDING AND UPLOADING
313
314 Use B<dgit build>, B<dgit sbuild>, B<dgit build-source>, and B<dgit
315 push> as detailed in dgit(1).  If any command fails, dgit will provide
316 a carefully-worded error message explaining what you should do.  If
317 it's not clear, file a bug against dgit.  Remember to pass I<--new>
318 for the first upload.
319
320 As an alternative to B<dgit build> and friends, you can use a tool
321 like gitpkg(1).  This works because like dgit, gitpkg(1) enforces that
322 HEAD has exactly the contents of the source package.  gitpkg(1) is
323 highly configurable, and one dgit user reports using it to produce and
324 test multiple source packages, from different branches corresponding
325 to each of the current Debian suites.
326
327 If you want to skip dgit's checks while iterating on a problem with
328 the package build (for example, you don't want to commit your changes
329 to git), you can just run dpkg-buildpackage(1) or debuild(1) instead.
330
331 =head1 NEW UPSTREAM RELEASES
332
333 =head2 Obtaining the release
334
335 =head3 When upstream tags releases in git
336
337 =over 4
338
339     % git remote update
340
341 =back
342
343 =head3 When upstream releases only tarballs
344
345 You will need the I<debian/gbp.conf> from "When upstream releases only
346 tarballs", above.  You will also need your upstream branch.  Above, we
347 pushed this to B<alioth.debian.org>.  You will need to clone or fetch
348 from there, instead of relying on B<dgit clone>/B<dgit fetch> alone.
349
350 Then, either
351
352 =over 4
353
354     % gbp import-orig --no-merge ../foo_1.2.3.orig.tar.xz
355
356 =back
357
358 or if you have a working watch file
359
360 =over 4
361
362     % gbp import-orig --no-merge --uscan
363
364 =back
365
366 =head2 Reviewing & merging the release
367
368 It's a good idea to preview the merge of the new upstream release.
369 First, just check for any new or deleted files that may need
370 accounting for in your copyright file:
371
372 =over 4
373
374     % git diff --stat master..1.2.3 -- . ':!debian'
375
376 =back
377
378 You can then review the full merge diff:
379
380 =over 4
381
382     % git merge-tree `git merge-base master 1.2.3` master 1.2.3 | $PAGER
383
384 =back
385
386 Once you're satisfied with what will be merged, update your package:
387
388 =over 4
389
390     % git merge 1.2.3
391     % dch -v1.2.3-1 New upstream release.
392     % git add debian/changelog && git commit -m changelog
393
394 =back
395
396 If you obtained a tarball from upstream, you are ready to try a build.
397 If you merged a git tag from upstream, you will first need to generate
398 a tarball:
399
400 =over 4
401
402     % git deborig
403
404 =back
405
406 =head1 HANDLING DFSG-NON-FREE MATERIAL
407
408 =head2 When upstream tags releases in git
409
410 We create a DFSG-clean tag to merge to master:
411
412 =over 4
413
414     % git checkout -b pre-dfsg 1.2.3
415     % git rm evil.bin
416     % git commit -m "upstream version 1.2.3 DFSG-cleaned"
417     % git tag -s 1.2.3+dfsg
418     % git checkout master
419     % git branch -D pre-dfsg
420
421 =back
422
423 Before merging the new 1.2.3+dfsg tag to master, you should first
424 determine whether it would be legally dangerous for the non-free
425 material to be publicly accessible in the git history on
426 B<dgit-repos>.
427
428 If it would be dangerous, there is a big problem;
429 in this case please consult your archive administrators
430 (for Debian this is the dgit administrator dgit-owner@debian.org
431 and the ftpmasters ftpmaster@ftp-master.debian.org).
432
433 =head2 When upstream releases only tarballs
434
435 The easiest way to handle this is to add a B<Files-Excluded> field to
436 I<debian/copyright>, and a B<uversionmangle> setting in
437 I<debian/watch>.  See uscan(1).  Alternatively, see the I<--filter>
438 option detailed in gbp-import-orig(1).
439
440 =head1 FORWARDING PATCHES UPSTREAM
441
442 The basic steps are:
443
444 =over 4
445
446 =item 1.
447
448 Create a new branch based off upstream's master branch.
449
450 =item 2.
451
452 git-cherry-pick(1) commits from your master branch onto your new
453 branch.
454
455 =item 3.
456
457 Push the branch somewhere and ask upstream to merge it, or use
458 git-format-patch(1) or git-request-pull(1).
459
460 =back
461
462 For example (and it is only an example):
463
464 =over 4
465
466     % # fork foo.git on GitHub
467     % git remote add -f fork git@github.com:spwhitton/foo.git
468     % git checkout -b fix-error upstream/master
469     % git config branch.fix-error.pushRemote fork
470     % git cherry-pick master^2
471     % git push
472     % # submit pull request on GitHub
473
474 =back
475
476 Note that when you merge an upstream release containing your forwarded
477 patches, git and dgit will transparently handle "dropping" the patches
478 that have been forwarded, "retaining" the ones that haven't.
479
480 =head1 INCORPORATING NMUS
481
482 =over 4
483
484     % dgit pull
485
486 =back
487
488 Alternatively, you can apply the NMU diff to your repository.  The
489 next push will then require I<--overwrite>.
490
491 =head1 SEE ALSO
492
493 dgit(1), dgit(7)
494
495 =head1 AUTHOR
496
497 This tutorial was written and is maintained by Sean Whitton <spwhitton@spwhitton.name>.  It contains contributions from other dgit contributors too - see the dgit copyright file.