chiark / gitweb /
normalize SGML elements which were <foo/.../ to <foo>...</foo>;
authoraph <aph@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Sun, 9 May 1999 22:11:59 +0000 (22:11 +0000)
committeraph <aph@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Sun, 9 May 1999 22:11:59 +0000 (22:11 +0000)
re-fill paragraphs -- NO CONTENT CHANGES

git-svn-id: svn://anonscm.debian.org/ddp/manuals/trunk/developers-reference@817 313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d

developers-reference.sgml

index 2ba3c0c..f9c21e0 100644 (file)
@@ -19,9 +19,9 @@
   <book>
 
       <title>Debian Developer's Reference
-      <author>Adam Di Carlo, current maintainer <email/aph@debian.org/
-      <author>Christian Schwarz <email/schwarz@debian.org/
-      <author>Ian Jackson <email/ijackson@gnu.ai.mit.edu/
+      <author>Adam Di Carlo, current maintainer <email>aph@debian.org</email>
+      <author>Christian Schwarz <email>schwarz@debian.org</email>
+      <author>Ian Jackson <email>ijackson@gnu.ai.mit.edu</email>
       <version>ver. &version;, &date;
 
       <copyright>
@@ -41,8 +41,8 @@ merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.  See the GNU
 General Public License for more details.
        <p>
 A copy of the GNU General Public License is available as
-<file>/usr/doc/copyright/GPL</file> in the Debian GNU/Linux distribution
-or on the World Wide Web at <url
+<file>/usr/doc/copyright/GPL</file> in the Debian GNU/Linux
+distribution or on the World Wide Web at <url
 id="http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html" name="the GNU website">.
 You can also obtain it by writing to the Free Software Foundation,
 Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
@@ -88,26 +88,28 @@ generally agreed-upon best practices.
       <sect>Getting started
        <p>
 So, you've read all the documentation, you understand what everything
-in the <package/hello/ example package is for, and you're about to
+in the <package>hello</package> example package is for, and you're about to
 Debianize your favourite piece of software.  How do you actually
 become a Debian developer so that your work can be incorporated into
 the Project?
        <p>
-Firstly, subscribe to <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ if you
-haven't already.  Send the word <tt/subscribe/ in the <em/Subject/ of
-an email to <email/debian-devel-REQUEST@lists.debian.org/.  In case of
+Firstly, subscribe to <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> if
+you haven't already.  Send the word <tt>subscribe</tt> in the
+<em>Subject</em> of an email to
+<email>debian-devel-REQUEST@lists.debian.org</email>.  In case of
 problems, contact the list administrator at
-<email/listmaster@lists.debian.org/.  More information on available
-mailing lists can be found in <ref id="mailing-lists">.
+<email>listmaster@lists.debian.org</email>.  More information on
+available mailing lists can be found in <ref id="mailing-lists">.
        <p>
 You should subscribe and lurk for a bit before doing any coding, and
 you should post about your intentions to work on something to avoid
 duplicated effort.
        <p>
 Another good list to subscribe to is
-<email/debian-mentors@lists.debian.org/.  See <ref id="mentors"> for
-details.  The IRC channel <tt/#debian/ on the Linux People IRC network 
-(i.e., <tt/irc.debian.org/) can also be helpful.
+<email>debian-mentors@lists.debian.org</email>.  See <ref
+id="mentors"> for details.  The IRC channel <tt>#debian</tt> on the
+Linux People IRC network (i.e., <tt>irc.debian.org</tt>) can also be
+helpful.
 
 
       <sect id="registering">Registering as a Debian developer
@@ -130,19 +132,20 @@ maintainers before we can give them accounts on our servers and
 letting them upload packages.
        <p>
 Registration requires that the following information be sent to
-<email/new-maintainer@debian.org/ as part of the registration
+<email>new-maintainer@debian.org</email> as part of the registration
 application:
 <list>
            <item>
 Your name.
            <item>
-Your preferred login name on <tt/master/ (seven characters or
+Your preferred login name on <tt>master</tt> (seven characters or
 less<footnote>It is not clear to the author why logins on
 <tt>master</tt> cannot be eight characters or greater.  If anyone can
 clarify why, I would appreciate it.</footnote>), as well as the email
 address at which you'd prefer to be subscribed to
-<email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/ (typically this will be either
-your primary mail address or your new <tt>debian.org</tt> address).
+<email>debian-private@lists.debian.org</email> (typically this will be
+either your primary mail address or your new <tt>debian.org</tt>
+address).
            <item>
 A phone number where we can call you.  Remember that the new
 maintainer team usually calls during evening hours to save on long
@@ -164,7 +167,7 @@ example, any of the following mechanisms would suffice:
 A PGP key signed by any well-known signature, such as:
 <list>
                        <item>
-Any current Debian developer you have met <em/in real life/.
+Any current Debian developer you have met <em>in real life</em>.
                        <item>
 Any formal certification service (such as Verisign, etc.) that
 verifies your identity.  A certification that verifies your email
@@ -185,9 +188,10 @@ critical to its security.  Many more security failures are due to
 human error than to software failure or high-powered spy techniques.
        <p>
 Our standard is to use <prgn>pgp</prgn> version 2.x.  You can use
-<prgn/pgp/ version 5, if and only if you make an RSA key.  Note that
-we are also working with the <prgn/gpg/ team so that we can have a
-free alternative to PGP; however, this may take a little bit of time.
+<prgn>pgp</prgn> version 5, if and only if you make an RSA key.  Note
+that we are also working with the <prgn>gpg</prgn> team so that we can
+have a free alternative to PGP; however, this may take a little bit of
+time.
        <p>
 Your PGP key must be at least 1024 bits long.  There is no reason to
 use a smaller key, and doing so would be much less secure.  Your key
@@ -205,7 +209,8 @@ isn't already there.
 Due to export restrictions by the United States government some Debian
 packages, including PGP, have been moved to an ftp site outside of the
 United States. You can find the current locations of those packages on
-<ftpsite/ftp.debian.org/ or <ftpsite/ftp.us.debian.org/ in the
+<ftpsite>ftp.debian.org</ftpsite> or
+<ftpsite>ftp.us.debian.org</ftpsite> in the
 <ftppath>/pub/debian/README.non-US</ftppath> file.
        <p>
 Some countries restrict the use of cryptographic software by their
@@ -213,43 +218,42 @@ citizens.  This need not impede one's activities as a Debian package
 maintainer however, as it may be perfectly legal to use cryptographic
 products for authentication, rather than encryption purposes (as is
 the case in France).  The Debian Project does not require the use of
-cryptography <em/qua/ cryptography in any manner.  If you live in a
+cryptography <em>qua</em> cryptography in any manner.  If you live in a
 country where use of cryptography even for authentication is forbidden
 then please contact us so we can make special arrangements.
        <p>
 Once you have all your information ready, and your public key is
 available on public key servers, send a message to
-<email/new-maintainer@debian.org/ to register as an offical Debian
-developer so that you will be able to upload your packages.  This
-message must contain all the information discussed above.  The message
-must also contain your PGP or RSA public key (extracted using <tt>pgp
--kxa</tt> in the case of PGP) for the database of keys which is
-distributed from <ftpsite/ftp.debian.org/ in
+<email>new-maintainer@debian.org</email> to register as an offical
+Debian developer so that you will be able to upload your packages.
+This message must contain all the information discussed above.  The
+message must also contain your PGP or RSA public key (extracted using
+<tt>pgp -kxa</tt> in the case of PGP) for the database of keys which
+is distributed from <ftpsite>ftp.debian.org</ftpsite> in
 <ftppath>/pub/debian/doc/debian-keyring.tar.gz</ftppath>, or the
-<package/debian-keyring/ package.  Please be sure to sign your request
-message with your chosen public key.
+<package>debian-keyring</package> package.  Please be sure to sign
+your request message with your chosen public key.
        <p>
 Once this information is received and processed, you should be
 contacted with information about your new Debian maintainer account.
 If you don't hear anything within 7-14 days, please send a followup
-message asking if your original application was received.  Do <em/not/
-re-send your original application, that will just confuse the
-new-maintainer team. Please be patient, especially near release
+message asking if your original application was received.  Do
+<em>not</em> re-send your original application, that will just confuse
+the new-maintainer team. Please be patient, especially near release
 points; mistakes do occasionally happen, and people do sometimes run
 out of volunteer time.
 
 
       <sect id="mentors">Debian Mentors
        <p>
-A mailing list called <email/debian-mentors@lists.debian.org/ which
-has been set up for novice maintainers who seek help with initial
-packaging and other developer-related issues.  Every new developer is
-invited to subscribe to that list (see <ref id="mailing-lists"> for
-details).
+A mailing list called <email>debian-mentors@lists.debian.org</email>
+which has been set up for novice maintainers who seek help with
+initial packaging and other developer-related issues.  Every new
+developer is invited to subscribe to that list (see <ref
+id="mailing-lists"> for details).
        <p>
-Those who prefer one-on-one help (e.g., via private email) should
-also post to that list and an experienced developer will volunteer to
-help.
+Those who prefer one-on-one help (e.g., via private email) should also
+post to that list and an experienced developer will volunteer to help.
 
 
     <chapt id="user-maint">Maintaining Your Debian Information
@@ -263,9 +267,8 @@ measure.
        <p>
 If you add or remove signatures from your public key, or add or remove
 user identities, you need to update the key servers and mail your
-public key to <email>keyring-maint@debian.org</email>.
-The same key extraction routines discussed in <ref id="registering">
-apply.
+public key to <email>keyring-maint@debian.org</email>.  The same key
+extraction routines discussed in <ref id="registering"> apply.
        <p>
 You can find a more in-depth discussion of Debian key maintenance in
 the documentation for the <package>debian-keyring</package> package.
@@ -294,39 +297,39 @@ which may be available to you as a developer.
 
       <sect id="mailing-lists">Mailing lists
        <p>
-The mailing list server is at <tt/lists.debian.org/.  Mail
-<tt/debian-<var/foo/-REQUEST@lists.debian.org/, where
-<tt/debian-<var/foo// is the name of the list, with the word
-<tt/subscribe/ in the <em/Subject/ to subscribe to the list or
-<tt/unsubscribe/ to unsubscribe.  More detailed instructions on how to
-subscribe and unsubscribe to the mailing lists can be found at <url
-id="http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe">, <url
+The mailing list server is at <tt>lists.debian.org</tt>.  Mail
+<tt>debian-<var>foo</var>-REQUEST@lists.debian.org</tt>, where
+<tt>debian-<var>foo</var></tt> is the name of the list, with the word
+<tt>subscribe</tt> in the <em>Subject</em> to subscribe to the list or
+<tt>unsubscribe</tt> to unsubscribe.  More detailed instructions on
+how to subscribe and unsubscribe to the mailing lists can be found at
+<url id="http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe">, <url
 id="ftp://ftp.debian.org/debian/doc/mailing-lists.txt"> or locally in
 <file>/usr/doc/debian/mailing-lists.txt</file> if you have the
 <package>doc-debian</package> package installed.
        <p>
 When replying to messages on the mailing list, please do not send a
-carbon copy (<tt/CC/) to the original poster unless they explicitly
+carbon copy (<tt>CC</tt>) to the original poster unless they explicitly
 request to be copied.  Anyone who posts to a mailing list should read
 it to see the responses.
        <p>
 In addition, all messages should usually only be sent to one of the
-following mailing lists: <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/,
-<email/debian-policy@lists.debian.org/,
-<email/debian-user@lists.debian.org/,
-<email/debian-announce@lists.debian.org/, or
-<email/debian-devel-announce@lists.debian.org/.  Additional mailing
-lists are available for special purposes; see <url
+following mailing lists: <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email>,
+<email>debian-policy@lists.debian.org</email>,
+<email>debian-user@lists.debian.org</email>,
+<email>debian-announce@lists.debian.org</email>, or
+<email>debian-devel-announce@lists.debian.org</email>.  Additional
+mailing lists are available for special purposes; see <url
 id="http://www.debian.org/MailingLists/subscribe">.  Cross-posting
 (sending the same message to multiple lists) is discouraged.
        <p>
-<email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/ is a special mailing lists for
-private discussions amongst Debian developers.  It is meant to be used
-for posts which for whatever reason should not be published
+<email>debian-private@lists.debian.org</email> is a special mailing
+lists for private discussions amongst Debian developers.  It is meant
+to be used for posts which for whatever reason should not be published
 publically.  As such, it is a low volume list, and users are urged not
-to use <email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/ unless it is really
-necessary.  Moreover, do <em/not/ forward email from that list to
-anyone.
+to use <email>debian-private@lists.debian.org</email> unless it is
+really necessary.  Moreover, do <em>not</em> forward email from that
+list to anyone.
        <p>
 As ever on the net, please trim down the quoting of articles you're
 replying to.  In general, please adhere to the usual conventions for
@@ -352,23 +355,24 @@ to submit bugs.
 
       <sect1 id="servers-master">The master server
        <p>
-The master server, <tt/master.debian.org/, holds the canonical copy
+The master server, <tt>master.debian.org</tt>, holds the canonical copy
 of the Debian archive (excluding the non-U.S. packages). Generally,
 package uploads go to this server; see <ref id="upload">. 
        <p>
-<tt/master.debian.org/ is the canonical location for the Bug Tracking
-System (BTS).  If you plan on doing some statistical analysis or
-processing of Debian bugs, this would be the place to do it.  Please
-describe your plans on <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ before
-implementing anything, however, to reduce unnecessary duplication of
-effort or wasted processing time.
+<tt>master.debian.org</tt> is the canonical location for the Bug
+Tracking System (BTS).  If you plan on doing some statistical analysis
+or processing of Debian bugs, this would be the place to do it.
+Please describe your plans on
+<email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> before implementing
+anything, however, to reduce unnecessary duplication of effort or
+wasted processing time.
        <p>
-All Debian developers have accounts on <tt/master.debian.org/.  Please
+All Debian developers have accounts on <tt>master.debian.org</tt>.  Please
 take care to protect your password to this machine.  Try to avoid
 login or upload methods which send passwords over the Internet in the
 clear.
        <p>
-If you find a problem with <tt/master.debian.org/ such as disk full,
+If you find a problem with <tt>master.debian.org</tt> such as disk full,
 suspicious activity, or whatever, send an email to
 <email>debian-admin@debian.org</email>.  Problems with the Debian FTP
 archive generally need to be reported as bugs against the
@@ -378,22 +382,24 @@ archive generally need to be reported as bugs against the
 
       <sect1 id="servers-www">The WWW servers
        <p>
-The main web server, <tt/www.debian.org/, is also known as
-<tt/va.debian.org/.  All developers are given accounts on this
+The main web server, <tt>www.debian.org</tt>, is also known as
+<tt>va.debian.org</tt>.  All developers are given accounts on this
 machine.
        <p>
 If you have some Debian-specific information which you want to serve
 up on the web, you can do do this by putting material in the
-<file>public_html</file> directory under your home directory.  You can do
-this on either <tt/va.debian.org/ or <tt/master.debian.org/.  Any
-material you put in those areas are accessible via the URLs
+<file>public_html</file> directory under your home directory.  You can
+do this on either <tt>va.debian.org</tt> or
+<tt>master.debian.org</tt>.  Any material you put in those areas are
+accessible via the URLs
 <tt>http://www.debian.org/~<var>user-id</var>/</tt> and
 <tt>http://master.debian.org/~<var>user-id</var>/</tt>, respectively.
-Generally, you'll want to use <tt/va/, for the <tt/www.debian.org/
-address, although in some cases you may need to put it on <tt/master/.
-Please do not put any material on Debian servers not relating to
-Debian, unless you have prior permission. Send mail to
-<email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ if you have any questions.
+Generally, you'll want to use <tt>va</tt>, for the
+<tt>www.debian.org</tt> address, although in some cases you may need
+to put it on <tt>master</tt>.  Please do not put any material on
+Debian servers not relating to Debian, unless you have prior
+permission. Send mail to <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email>
+if you have any questions.
        <p>
 If you find a problem with the Debian web server, you should generally
 submit a bug against the pseudo-package,
@@ -405,12 +411,12 @@ Tracking System">.
 
       <sect1 id="servers-cvs">The CVS server
        <p>
-<tt/cvs.debian.org/ is also known as <tt/va.debian.org/, discussed
-above.  If you need the use of a publically accessible CVS server, for
-instance, to help coordinate work on a package between many different
-developers, you can request a CVS area on the server.
+<tt>cvs.debian.org</tt> is also known as <tt>va.debian.org</tt>,
+discussed above.  If you need the use of a publically accessible CVS
+server, for instance, to help coordinate work on a package between
+many different developers, you can request a CVS area on the server.
          <p>
-Generally, <tt/cvs.debian.org/ offers a combination of local CVS
+Generally, <tt>cvs.debian.org</tt> offers a combination of local CVS
 access, anonymous client-server read-only access, and full
 client-server access through <prgn>ssh</prgn>.  Also, the CVS area can
 be accessed read-only via the Web at <url
@@ -444,9 +450,9 @@ Note that mirrors are generally run by third-parties who are
 interested in helping Debian.  As such, developers generally do not
 have accounts on these machines.
        <p>
-Please do not mirror off of <tt/master.debian.org/.  This host already
-has too much load.  Check the sites above for information, or email
-<email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/.
+Please do not mirror off of <tt>master.debian.org</tt>.  This host
+already has too much load.  Check the sites above for information, or
+email <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email>.
 
 
       <sect id="other-machines">Other Debian Machines
@@ -517,8 +523,8 @@ UltraSPARC) from <email>wdeng@kachinatech.com</email>.
       <sect>Overview
        <p>
 The Debian GNU/Linux distribution consists of a lot of Debian packages
-(<tt/.deb/'s, currently around &number-of-pkgs;) and a few additional files
-(documentation, installation disk images, etc.).
+(<tt>.deb</tt>'s, currently around &number-of-pkgs;) and a few
+additional files (documentation, installation disk images, etc.).
        <p>
 Here is an example directory tree of a complete Debian distribution:
        <p>
@@ -562,30 +568,30 @@ non-free/source/
 </example>
        <p>
 As you can see, the top-level directory of the distribution contains
-three directories, namely <em/main/, <em/contrib/, and
-<em/non-free/. These directories are called <em/sections/.
+three directories, namely <em>main</em>, <em>contrib</em>, and
+<em>non-free</em>. These directories are called <em>sections</em>.
        <p>
 In each section, there is a directory with the source packages
 (source), a directory for each supported architecture
-(<tt/binary-i386/, <tt/binary-m68k/, etc.), and a directory for
-architecture independent packages (<tt/binary-all/).
+(<tt>binary-i386</tt>, <tt>binary-m68k</tt>, etc.), and a directory
+for architecture independent packages (<tt>binary-all</tt>).
        <p>
-The <em/main/ section contains additional directories which holds the
-disk images and some essential pieces of documentation required for
-installing the Debian distribution on a specific architecture
-(<tt/disks-i386/, <tt/disks-m68k/, etc.).
+The <em>main</em> section contains additional directories which holds
+the disk images and some essential pieces of documentation required
+for installing the Debian distribution on a specific architecture
+(<tt>disks-i386</tt>, <tt>disks-m68k</tt>, etc.).
        <p>
-The <em/binary/ and <em/source/ directories are divided further into
-<em/subsections/.
+The <em>binary</em> and <em>source</em> directories are divided
+further into <em>subsections</em>.
 
 
       <sect>Sections
        <p>
 The <em>main</em> section is what makes up the <em>official Debian
-GNU/Linux distribution</em>.  The <em/main/ section is official because
-it fully complies with all our guidelines.  The other two sections do
-not, to different degrees; as such, they are not officially part of
-Debian.
+GNU/Linux distribution</em>.  The <em>main</em> section is official
+because it fully complies with all our guidelines.  The other two
+sections do not, to different degrees; as such, they are not
+officially part of Debian.
        <p>
 Every package in the main section must fully comply with the <!-- work
 around quoting of fragment idendifiers bug <url
@@ -598,13 +604,13 @@ name="Debian Policy Manual">.  The DFSG is our definition of ``free
 software.'' Check out the Debian Policy Manual for details.
        <p>
 The packages which do not apply to the DFSG are placed in the
-<em/non-free/ section. These packages are not considered as part of
-the Debian distribution, though we support their use, and we provide
-infrastructure (such as our bug-tracking system and mailing lists) for
-non-free software packages.
+<em>non-free</em> section. These packages are not considered as part
+of the Debian distribution, though we support their use, and we
+provide infrastructure (such as our bug-tracking system and mailing
+lists) for non-free software packages.
        <p>
-Packages in the <em/contrib/ section have to comply with the DFSG, but
-may fail other requirements.  For instance, they may depend on
+Packages in the <em>contrib</em> section have to comply with the DFSG,
+but may fail other requirements.  For instance, they may depend on
 non-free packages.
        <p>
 The <url id="http://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/" name="Debian
@@ -614,14 +620,14 @@ sections. The above discussion is just an introduction.
 The separation of the three sections at the top-level of the archive
 is important for all people who want to distribute Debian, either via
 FTP servers on the Internet or on CD-ROMs: by distributing only the
-<em/main/ and <em/contrib/ sections, one can avoid any legal risks.
-Some packages in the <em/non-free/ section do not allow commercial
-distribution, for example.
+<em>main</em> and <em>contrib</em> sections, one can avoid any legal
+risks.  Some packages in the <em>non-free</em> section do not allow
+commercial distribution, for example.
        <p>
 On the other hand, a CD-ROM vendor could easily check the individual
-package licenses of the packages in <em/non-free/ and include as many
-on the CD-ROMs as he's allowed. (Since this varies greatly from vendor
-to vendor, this job can't be done by the Debian developers.)
+package licenses of the packages in <em>non-free</em> and include as
+many on the CD-ROMs as he's allowed. (Since this varies greatly from
+vendor to vendor, this job can't be done by the Debian developers.)
 
 
       <sect>Architectures
@@ -632,11 +638,11 @@ more and more popular, the kernel was ported to other architectures,
 too.
        <p>
 The Linux 2.0 kernel supports Intel x86, DEC Alpha, SPARC, Motorola
-680x0 (like Atari, Amiga and Macintoshes), MIPS, and PowerPC.
-The Linux 2.2 kernel supports even more architectures, including ARM
-and UltraSPARC.  Since Linux supports these platforms, Debian decided
-that it should, too.  Therefore, Debian has ports underway.  In fact,
-we also have ports underway to non-Linux kernel.  Aside from
+680x0 (like Atari, Amiga and Macintoshes), MIPS, and PowerPC.  The
+Linux 2.2 kernel supports even more architectures, including ARM and
+UltraSPARC.  Since Linux supports these platforms, Debian decided that
+it should, too.  Therefore, Debian has ports underway.  In fact, we
+also have ports underway to non-Linux kernel.  Aside from
 <em>i386</em> (our name for Intel x86), there is <em>m68k</em>,
 <em>alpha</em>, <em>powerpc</em>, <em>sparc</em>, <em>hurd-i386</em>,
 and <em>arm</em>, as of this writing.
@@ -650,46 +656,46 @@ ships for the <em>i386</em>, <em>m68k</em>, <em>alpha</em>, and
 
       <sect>Subsections
        <p>
-The sections <em/main/, <em/contrib/, and <em/non-free/ are split into
-<em/subsections/ to simplify the installation process and the
-maintainance of the archive.  Subsections are not formally defined,
-excepting perhaps the `base' subsection.  Subsections exist simply
-to simplify the organization and browsing of available packages.
-Please check the current Debian distribution to see which sections are
-available.
+The sections <em>main</em>, <em>contrib</em>, and <em>non-free</em>
+are split into <em>subsections</em> to simplify the installation
+process and the maintainance of the archive.  Subsections are not
+formally defined, excepting perhaps the `base' subsection.
+Subsections exist simply to simplify the organization and browsing of
+available packages.  Please check the current Debian distribution to
+see which sections are available.
 
 
       <sect>Packages
        <p>
-There are two types of Debian packages, namely <em/source/ and
-<em/binary/ packages.
+There are two types of Debian packages, namely <em>source</em> and
+<em>binary</em> packages.
        <p>
-Source packages consist of either two or three files: a <tt/.dsc/
-file, and either a <tt/.tar.gz/ file or both an <tt/.orig.tar.gz/ and
-a <tt/.diff.gz/ file.
+Source packages consist of either two or three files: a <tt>.dsc</tt>
+file, and either a <tt>.tar.gz</tt> file or both an
+<tt>.orig.tar.gz</tt> and a <tt>.diff.gz</tt> file.
        <p>
 If a package is developed specially for Debian and is not distributed
-outside of Debian, there is just one <tt/.tar.gz/ file which contains
-the sources of the program.  If a package is distributed elsewhere
-too, the <tt/.orig.tar.gz/ file stores the so-called <em/upstream
-source code/, that is the source code that's distributed from the
-<em/upstream maintainer/ (often the author of the software). In this
-case, the <tt/.diff.gz/ contains the changes made by the Debian
-maintainer.
-       <p>
-The <tt/.dsc/ lists all the files in the source package together with
-checksums (md5sums) and some additional info about the package
+outside of Debian, there is just one <tt>.tar.gz</tt> file which
+contains the sources of the program.  If a package is distributed
+elsewhere too, the <tt>.orig.tar.gz</tt> file stores the so-called
+<em>upstream source code</em>, that is the source code that's
+distributed from the <em>upstream maintainer</em> (often the author of
+the software). In this case, the <tt>.diff.gz</tt> contains the
+changes made by the Debian maintainer.
+       <p>
+The <tt>.dsc</tt> lists all the files in the source package together
+with checksums (md5sums) and some additional info about the package
 (maintainer, version, etc.).
 
 
       <sect>Distribution directories
        <p>
 The directory system described in the previous chapter, are themselves
-contained within <em/distribution directories/.  Every distribution is
-contained in the <tt/dists/ directory in the top-level of the Debian
-archive itself (the symlinks from the top-level directory to the
-distributions themselves are for backwards compatability and are
-deprecated).
+contained within <em>distribution directories</em>.  Every
+distribution is contained in the <tt>dists</tt> directory in the
+top-level of the Debian archive itself (the symlinks from the
+top-level directory to the distributions themselves are for backwards
+compatability and are deprecated).
        <p>
 To summarize, the Debian archive has a root directory within an FTP
 server.  For instance, at the mirror site,
@@ -698,80 +704,81 @@ contained in <ftppath>/debian</ftppath>, which is a common location
 (another is <ftppath>/pub/debian</ftppath>).
        <p>
 Within that archive root, the actual distributions are contained in
-the <tt/dists/ directory.  Here is an overview of the layout:
+the <tt>dists</tt> directory.  Here is an overview of the layout:
        <p>
 <example>
 <var>archive root</var>/dists/<var>distribution</var>/<var>section</var>/<var>architecture</var>/<var>subsection</var>/<var>packages</var>
 </example>
 
 Extrapolating from this layout, you know that to find the i386 base
-packages for the distribution <em/slink/, you would look in
+packages for the distribution <em>slink</em>, you would look in
 <ftppath>/debian/dists/slink/main/binary-i386/base/</ftppath>.
 
        <sect1>Stable, unstable, and sometimes frozen
        <p>
-There is always a distribution called <em/stable/ (residing in
-<tt>dists/stable</tt>) and one called <em/unstable/ (residing in
+There is always a distribution called <em>stable</em> (residing in
+<tt>dists/stable</tt>) and one called <em>unstable</em> (residing in
 <tt>dists/unstable</tt>). This reflects the development process of the
 Debian project.
        <p>
-Active development is done in the <em/unstable/ distribution (that's
-why this distribution is sometimes called the <em/development
-distribution/). Every Debian developer can update his or her packages
-in this distribution at any time. Thus, the contents of this
+Active development is done in the <em>unstable</em> distribution
+(that's why this distribution is sometimes called the <em>development
+distribution</em>). Every Debian developer can update his or her
+packages in this distribution at any time. Thus, the contents of this
 distribution change from day-to-day. Since no special effort is done
 to test this distribution, it is sometimes ``unstable.''
        <p>
-After a period of development, the <em/unstable/ distribution is
-copied in a new distribution directory, called <em/frozen/. When that
-occurs, no changes are allowed to the frozen distribution except bug
-fixes; that's why it's called ``frozen.''  After another month or a
-little longer, the <em/frozen/ distribution is renamed to <em/stable/,
-overriding the old <em/stable/ distribution, which is removed at that
-time.
+After a period of development, the <em>unstable</em> distribution is
+copied in a new distribution directory, called <em>frozen</em>. When
+that occurs, no changes are allowed to the frozen distribution except
+bug fixes; that's why it's called ``frozen.''  After another month or
+a little longer, the <em>frozen</em> distribution is renamed to
+<em>stable</em>, overriding the old <em>stable</em> distribution,
+which is removed at that time.
        <p>
 This development cycle is based on the assumption that the
-<em/unstable/ distribution becomes <em/stable/ after passing a period
-of testing as <em/frozen/.  Even once a distribution is considered
-stable, a few bugs inevitably remain--that's why the stable
+<em>unstable</em> distribution becomes <em>stable</em> after passing a
+period of testing as <em>frozen</em>.  Even once a distribution is
+considered stable, a few bugs inevitably remain--that's why the stable
 distribution is updated every now and then. However, these updates are
 tested very carefully and have to be introduced into the archive
 individually to reduce the risk of introducing new bugs.  You can find
-proposed additions to <em/stable/ in the <tt/proposed-updates/
-directory.  Those packages in <tt/proposed-updates/ that pass muster
-are periodically moved as a batch into the stable distribution and the
-revision level of the stable distribution is incremented (e.g., `1.3'
-becomes `1.3r1', `2.0r2' becomes `2.0r3', and so forth).
+proposed additions to <em>stable</em> in the <tt>proposed-updates</tt>
+directory.  Those packages in <tt>proposed-updates</tt> that pass
+muster are periodically moved as a batch into the stable distribution
+and the revision level of the stable distribution is incremented
+(e.g., `1.3' becomes `1.3r1', `2.0r2' becomes `2.0r3', and so forth).
        <p>
-Note that development under <em/unstable/ is continued during the
-``freeze'' period, since a new <em/unstable/ distribution is be
-created when the older <em/unstable/ is moved to <em/frozen/.
-Another wrinkle is that when the <em/frozen/ distribution is offically 
-released, the old stable distribution is completely removed from the
-Debian archives (although you can still find it from servers which
-serve up older, obsolete distributions).
+Note that development under <em>unstable</em> is continued during the
+``freeze'' period, since a new <em>unstable</em> distribution is be
+created when the older <em>unstable</em> is moved to <em>frozen</em>.
+Another wrinkle is that when the <em>frozen</em> distribution is
+offically released, the old stable distribution is completely removed
+from the Debian archives (although you can still find it from servers
+which serve up older, obsolete distributions).
        <p>
-In summary, there is always a <em/stable/ and an <em/unstable/
-distribution available, and the <em/frozen/ distribution shows up for
-a month or so from time to time.
+In summary, there is always a <em>stable</em> and an <em>unstable</em>
+distribution available, and the <em>frozen</em> distribution shows up
+for a month or so from time to time.
 
 
        <sect1>Experimental
          <p>
-The <em/experimental/ distribution is a specialty distribution.  It is
-not a full distribution in the same sense that `stable' and `unstable'
-are.  Instead, it is meant to be a temporary staging area for highly
-experimental software where there's a good chance that the software
-could break your system.  Users who download and install packages from
-<em/experimental/ are expected to have been duly warned.  In short,
-all bets are off for the <em/experimental/ distribution.
+The <em>experimental</em> distribution is a specialty distribution.
+It is not a full distribution in the same sense that `stable' and
+`unstable' are.  Instead, it is meant to be a temporary staging area
+for highly experimental software where there's a good chance that the
+software could break your system.  Users who download and install
+packages from <em>experimental</em> are expected to have been duly
+warned.  In short, all bets are off for the <em>experimental</em>
+distribution.
          <p>
 Developers should be very selective in the use of the
-<em/experimental/ distribution.  Even if a package is highly unstable,
-it could well still go into <em/unstable/; just state a few warnings
-in the description.  However, if there is a chance that the software
-could do grave damage to a system, it might be better to put it into
-<em/experimental/.
+<em>experimental</em> distribution.  Even if a package is highly
+unstable, it could well still go into <em>unstable</em>; just state a
+few warnings in the description.  However, if there is a chance that
+the software could do grave damage to a system, it might be better to
+put it into <em>experimental</em>.
          <p>
 For instance, an experimental encrypted file system should probably go
 into <em>experimental</em>.  A new, beta, version of some software
@@ -794,20 +801,20 @@ less strain on the Debian archive maintainers.
 
       <sect id="codenames">Release code names
        <p>
-Every released Debian distribution has a <em/code name/: Debian 1.1 is
-called `buzz'; Debian 1.2, `rex'; Debian 1.3, `bo'; Debian 2.0,
-`hamm'; Debian 2.1, `slink'; and Debian 2.2, `potato'.  There is
-also a ``pseudo-distribution'', called `sid' which is contains
-packages for architectures which are not yet officially supported or
-released by Debian.  These architectures are planned to be integrated
-into the mainstream distribution at some future date.
+Every released Debian distribution has a <em>code name</em>: Debian
+1.1 is called `buzz'; Debian 1.2, `rex'; Debian 1.3, `bo'; Debian 2.0,
+`hamm'; Debian 2.1, `slink'; and Debian 2.2, `potato'.  There is also
+a ``pseudo-distribution'', called `sid' which is contains packages for
+architectures which are not yet officially supported or released by
+Debian.  These architectures are planned to be integrated into the
+mainstream distribution at some future date.
        <p>
 Since the Debian has an open development model (i.e., everyone can
 participate and follow the development) even the unstable distribution
 is distributed via the Internet on the Debian FTP and HTTP server
 network. Thus, if we had called the directory which contains the
-development version `unstable', then we would have to rename it
-to `stable' when the version is released, which would cause all FTP
+development version `unstable', then we would have to rename it to
+`stable' when the version is released, which would cause all FTP
 mirrors to re-retrieve the whole distribution (which is already very
 large!).
        <p>
@@ -820,12 +827,12 @@ version. That's the reason why the first official Debian release was
        <p>
 Thus, the names of the distribution directories in the archive are
 determined by their code names and not their release status (i.e.,
-`slink').  These names stay the same during the development period
-and after the release; symbolic links, which can be changed, are made
-to indicate the currently released stable distribution.  That's why
-the real distribution directories use the <em/code names/ and symbolic
-links for <em/stable/, <em/unstable/, and <em/frozen/ point to the
-appropriate release directories.
+`slink').  These names stay the same during the development period and
+after the release; symbolic links, which can be changed, are made to
+indicate the currently released stable distribution.  That's why the
+real distribution directories use the <em>code names</em> and symbolic
+links for <em>stable</em>, <em>unstable</em>, and <em>frozen</em>
+point to the appropriate release directories.
 
 
     <chapt id="upload">Package uploads
@@ -839,10 +846,10 @@ name="Work-Needing and Prospective Packages (WNPP)"> list.  Checking
 the WNPP ensures that no one is already working on packaging that
 software, and that effort is not duplicated. Assuming no one else is
 already working on your prospective package, you must then send a
-short email to <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ describing your
-plan to create a new package.  You should set the subject of the email
-to ``intent to package <var/foobar/'', substituting the name of the new
-package for <var/foobar/.
+short email to <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> describing
+your plan to create a new package.  You should set the subject of the
+email to ``intent to package <var>foobar</var>'', substituting the
+name of the new package for <var>foobar</var>.
        <p>
 There are a number of reasons why we ask maintainers to follow these
 steps:
@@ -854,13 +861,14 @@ on it already.
            <item>
 It lets other people thinking about working on the package know that
 there already is a volunteer, and efforts may be shared.  The ``intent
-to package'' message to <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ will be
-picked up the the WNPP maintainer, and your intention will be
+to package'' message to <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email>
+will be picked up the the WNPP maintainer, and your intention will be
 published in subsequent versions of the WNPP document.
            <item>
 It lets the rest of the maintainers know more about the package than
 the one line description and the changelog entry ``Initial version''
-that generally gets posted to <tt/debian-devel-changes/ by default.
+that generally gets posted to <tt>debian-devel-changes</tt> by
+default.
            <item>
 It is helpful to the people who live off unstable (and form our first
 line of testers); we should encourage these people.
@@ -875,95 +883,98 @@ better feel of what is going on, and what is new, in the project.
        <sect1>Generating the changes file
          <p>
 When a package is uploaded to the Debian FTP archive, it must be
-accompanied by a <tt/.changes/ file, which gives directions to the
+accompanied by a <tt>.changes</tt> file, which gives directions to the
 archive maintainers for its handling.  This is usually generated by
-<prgn/dpkg-genchanges/ during the normal package build process.
+<prgn>dpkg-genchanges</prgn> during the normal package build process.
          <p>
 The changes file is a control file with the following fields:
          <p>
 <list compact>
-             <item><tt/Format/
-             <item><tt/Date/
-             <item><tt/Source/
-             <item><tt/Binary/
-             <item><tt/Architecture/
-             <item><tt/Version/
-             <item><tt/Distribution/
-             <item><tt/Urgency/
-             <item><tt/Maintainer/
-             <item><tt/Description/
-             <item><tt/Changes/
-             <item><tt/Files/
+             <item><tt>Format</tt>
+             <item><tt>Date</tt>
+             <item><tt>Source</tt>
+             <item><tt>Binary</tt>
+             <item><tt>Architecture</tt>
+             <item><tt>Version</tt>
+             <item><tt>Distribution</tt>
+             <item><tt>Urgency</tt>
+             <item><tt>Maintainer</tt>
+             <item><tt>Description</tt>
+             <item><tt>Changes</tt>
+             <item><tt>Files</tt>
            </list>
          <p>
 All of these fields are mandatory for a Debian upload.  See the list
 of control fields in the <url
 id="http://www.debian.org/doc/packaging-manuals/packaging.html/"
 name="Debian Packaging Manual"> for the contents of these fields.
-Only the <tt/Distribution/ field is discussed here, since it relates
-to the archive maintenance policies.
+Only the <tt>Distribution</tt> field is discussed here, since it
+relates to the archive maintenance policies.
 
        <sect1 id="upload-dist">Picking a distribution
          <p>
-Notably, the <tt/Distribution/ field, which originates from the
+Notably, the <tt>Distribution</tt> field, which originates from the
 <file>debian/changelog</file> file, indicates which distribution the
 package is intended for.  There are four possible values for this
 field: `stable', `unstable', `frozen', or `experimental'; these values
 can also be combined.  For instance, if you have a crucial security
 fix release of a package, and the package has not diverged between the
-<em/stable/ and <em/unstable/ distributions, then you might put
-`stable unstable' in the <file>changelog</file>'s <tt/Distribution/ field.
-Or, if Debian has been frozen, and you want to get a bug-fix release
-into <em/frozen/, you would set the distribution to `frozen unstable'.
-(See <ref id="upload-frozen"> for more information on when to upload to
-<em/frozen/.)  Note that setting the distribution to `stable' means
-that the package will be placed into the <tt>proposed-updates</tt>
-directory of the Debian archive for further testing before it is
-actually included in <em/stable/.  Also note that it never makes sense
-to combine the <em/experimental/ distribution with anything else.
+<em>stable</em> and <em>unstable</em> distributions, then you might
+put `stable unstable' in the <file>changelog</file>'s
+<tt>Distribution</tt> field.  Or, if Debian has been frozen, and you
+want to get a bug-fix release into <em>frozen</em>, you would set the
+distribution to `frozen unstable'.  (See <ref id="upload-frozen"> for
+more information on when to upload to <em>frozen</em>.)  Note that
+setting the distribution to `stable' means that the package will be
+placed into the <tt>proposed-updates</tt> directory of the Debian
+archive for further testing before it is actually included in
+<em>stable</em>.  Also note that it never makes sense to combine the
+<em>experimental</em> distribution with anything else.
          <p>
 The first time a version is uploaded which corresponds to a particular
 upstream version the original source tar file should be uploaded and
-included in the <tt/.changes/ file; subsequent times the very same tar
-file should be used to build the new diffs and <tt/.dsc/ files, and it
-need not then be uploaded.
+included in the <tt>.changes</tt> file; subsequent times the very same
+tar file should be used to build the new diffs and <tt>.dsc</tt>
+files, and it need not then be uploaded.
          <p>
-By default <prgn/dpkg-genchanges/ and <prgn/dpkg-buildpackage/ will
-include the original source tar file if and only if the Debian
-revision part of the source version number is <tt/0/ or <tt/1/,
-indicating a new upstream version.  This behaviour may be modified by
-using <tt/-sa/ to always include it or <tt/-sd/ to always leave it
-out.
+By default <prgn>dpkg-genchanges</prgn> and
+<prgn>dpkg-buildpackage</prgn> will include the original source tar
+file if and only if the Debian revision part of the source version
+number is <tt>0</tt> or <tt>1</tt>, indicating a new upstream version.
+This behaviour may be modified by using <tt>-sa</tt> to always include
+it or <tt>-sd</tt> to always leave it out.
          <p>
 If no original source is included in the upload then the original
-source tar-file used by <prgn/dpkg-source/ when constructing the
-<tt/.dsc/ file and diff to be uploaded <em/must/ be byte-for-byte
-identical with the one already in the archive.  If there is some
-reason why this is not the case then the new version of the original
-source should be uploaded, possibly by using the <tt/-sa/ flag.
-
-         <sect2 id="upload-frozen">Uploading to <em/frozen/
+source tar-file used by <prgn>dpkg-source</prgn> when constructing the
+<tt>.dsc</tt> file and diff to be uploaded <em>must</em> be
+byte-for-byte identical with the one already in the archive.  If there
+is some reason why this is not the case then the new version of the
+original source should be uploaded, possibly by using the <tt>-sa</tt>
+flag.
+
+         <sect2 id="upload-frozen">Uploading to <em>frozen</em>
            <p>
 The Debian freeze is a crucial time for Debian.  It is our chance to
 synchronize and stabilize our distribution as a whole.  Therefore,
-care must be taken when uploading to <em/frozen/.
+care must be taken when uploading to <em>frozen</em>.
            <p>
 It is tempting to always try to get the newest release of software
 into the release.  However, it's much more important that the system
 as a whole is stable and works as expected.
            <p>
-The watchword for uploading to <em/frozen/ is <strong>no new
+The watchword for uploading to <em>frozen</em> is <strong>no new
 code</strong>.  This is a difficult thing to quantify, so here are
 some guidelines:
            <p>
 <list>
                <item>
-Fixes for bugs of severity <em/critical/, <em/grave/, or
-<em/important/ severity are always allowed for those packages that
+Fixes for bugs of severity <em>critical</em>, <em>grave</em>, or
+<em>important</em> severity are always allowed for those packages that
 must exist in the final release
                <item>
-<em/critical/, <em/grave/, and <em/important/ bug fixes are only
-allowed for non-necessary packages if they don't add any new features
+<em>critical</em>, <em>grave</em>, and <em>important</em> bug fixes
+are only allowed for non-necessary packages if they don't add any new
+features
                <item>
 normal bug fixes are allowed (though discouraged) on all packages if
 and only if there are no new features
@@ -993,106 +1004,109 @@ Install the package and make sure the software works, or upgrade the
 package from an older version to your new version if a Debian package
 for it already exists.
              <item>
-Run <prgn/lintian/ over the package.  You can run <prgn/lintian/ as
-follows: <tt>lintian -v <var>package-version</var>.changes</tt>. This will
-check the source package as well as the binary package.  If you don't
-understand the output that <prgn/lintian/ generates, try adding the
-<tt/-i/ switch, which will cause <prgn/lintian/ to output a very
-verbose description of the problem.
+Run <prgn>lintian</prgn> over the package.  You can run
+<prgn>lintian</prgn> as follows: <tt>lintian -v
+<var>package-version</var>.changes</tt>. This will check the source
+package as well as the binary package.  If you don't understand the
+output that <prgn>lintian</prgn> generates, try adding the <tt>-i</tt>
+switch, which will cause <prgn>lintian</prgn> to output a very verbose
+description of the problem.
                <p>
-Normally, a package should <em/not/ be uploaded if it causes lintian
-to emit errors (they will start with <tt/E/).
+Normally, a package should <em>not</em> be uploaded if it causes lintian
+to emit errors (they will start with <tt>E</tt>).
                <p>
-For more information on <prgn/lintian/, see <ref id="lintian">.
+For more information on <prgn>lintian</prgn>, see <ref id="lintian">.
              <item>
 Downgrade the package to the previous version (if one exists) -- this
-tests the <tt/postrm/ and <tt/prerm/ scripts.
+tests the <tt>postrm</tt> and <tt>prerm</tt> scripts.
              <item>
 Remove the package, then reinstall it.
            </list>
 
 
-       <sect1 id="upload-master">Uploading to <tt/master/
+       <sect1 id="upload-master">Uploading to <tt>master</tt>
          <p>
 To upload a package, you need a personal account on
 <ftpsite>master.debian.org</ftpsite>.  All maintainers should already
 have this account, see <ref id="servers-master">.  You can use either
-<prgn/ssh/ or <prgn/ftp/ to transfer the files.  In either case, the
-files need to be placed into
+<prgn>ssh</prgn> or <prgn>ftp</prgn> to transfer the files.  In either
+case, the files need to be placed into
 <ftppath>/home/Debian/ftp/private/project/Incoming</ftppath>.  (You
 cannot upload to Incoming on master using anonymous FTP -- you must
 use your user-name and password.)
           <p>
-<em/Note:/ Do not upload packages containing software that is
-export-controlled by the United States government to <tt/master/, or
-to the overseas upload queues on <tt/chiark/ or <tt/erlangen/.  This
-prohibition covers almost all cryptographic software, and even
-sometimes software that contains ``hooks'' to cryptographic software,
-such as electronic mail readers that support PGP encryption and
-authentication.  Uploads of such software should go to <tt/non-us/
-(see below).  If you are not sure whether U.S. export controls apply
-to your package, post a message to
-<email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ and ask.
+<em>Note:</em> Do not upload packages containing software that is
+export-controlled by the United States government to <tt>master</tt>,
+or to the overseas upload queues on <tt>chiark</tt> or
+<tt>erlangen</tt>.  This prohibition covers almost all cryptographic
+software, and even sometimes software that contains ``hooks'' to
+cryptographic software, such as electronic mail readers that support
+PGP encryption and authentication.  Uploads of such software should go
+to <tt>non-us</tt> (see below).  If you are not sure whether
+U.S. export controls apply to your package, post a message to
+<email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> and ask.
          <p>
-You may also find the Debian package <package/dupload/ useful when
-uploading packages.  This handy program is distributed with defaults
-for uploading via <prgn/ftp/ to <tt/master/, <tt/chiark/, and
-<tt/erlangen/.  It can also be configured to use <prgn/ssh/.  See
-<manref name="dupload" section="1"> and <manref name="dupload"
-section="5"> for more information.
+You may also find the Debian package <package>dupload</package> useful
+when uploading packages.  This handy program is distributed with
+defaults for uploading via <prgn>ftp</prgn> to <tt>master</tt>,
+<tt>chiark</tt>, and <tt>erlangen</tt>.  It can also be configured to
+use <prgn>ssh</prgn>.  See <manref name="dupload" section="1"> and
+<manref name="dupload" section="5"> for more information.
 
 
-       <sect1>Uploads via <tt/chiark/
+       <sect1>Uploads via <tt>chiark</tt>
          <p>
-If you have a slow network connection to <tt/master/, there are
-alternatives.  One is to upload files to <tt/Incoming/ via a
-upload queue in Europe on <tt/chiark/. For details connect
-to <ftpsite>ftp.chiark.greenend.org.uk</ftpsite> using anonymous FTP
-and read
+If you have a slow network connection to <tt>master</tt>, there are
+alternatives.  One is to upload files to <tt>Incoming</tt> via a
+upload queue in Europe on <tt>chiark</tt>. For details connect to
+<ftpsite>ftp.chiark.greenend.org.uk</ftpsite> using anonymous FTP and
+read
 <ftppath>/pub/debian/private/project/README.how-to-upload</ftppath>.
          <p>
-<em/Note:/ Do not upload packages containing software that is
+<em>Note:</em> Do not upload packages containing software that is
 export-controlled by the United States government to the queue on
-<tt/chiark/.  Since this upload queue goes to <tt/master/, the
+<tt>chiark</tt>.  Since this upload queue goes to <tt>master</tt>, the
 prescription found in <ref id="upload-master"> applies here as well.
          <p>
-The program <tt/dupload/ supports uploads to <tt/chiark/; please refer
+The program <tt>dupload</tt> supports uploads to <tt>chiark</tt>; please refer
 to the documentation that comes with the program for details.
 
 
-       <sect1>Uploads via <tt/erlangen/
+       <sect1>Uploads via <tt>erlangen</tt>
          <p>
-Another upload queue is available in Germany: just upload
-the files via anonymous FTP to <url
+Another upload queue is available in Germany: just upload the files
+via anonymous FTP to <url
 id="ftp://ftp.uni-erlangen.de/pub/Linux/debian/UploadQueue">.
          <p>
 The upload must be a complete Debian upload, as you would put it into
-<tt/master/'s <tt/Incoming/, i.e., a <tt/.changes/ files along with the
-other files mentioned in the <tt/.changes/. The queue daemon also
-checks that the <tt/.changes/ is correctly PGP-signed by a Debian
-developer, so that no bogus files can find their way to <tt/master/
-via the queue. Please also make sure that the <tt/Maintainer/ field
-in the <tt/.changes/ contains <em/your/ e-mail address. The address
-found there is used for all replies, just as on <tt/master/.
+<tt>master</tt>'s <tt>Incoming</tt>, i.e., a <tt>.changes</tt> files
+along with the other files mentioned in the <tt>.changes</tt>. The
+queue daemon also checks that the <tt>.changes</tt> is correctly
+PGP-signed by a Debian developer, so that no bogus files can find
+their way to <tt>master</tt> via the queue. Please also make sure that
+the <tt>Maintainer</tt> field in the <tt>.changes</tt> contains
+<em>your</em> e-mail address. The address found there is used for all
+replies, just as on <tt>master</tt>.
          <p>
 There's no need to move your files into a second directory after the
-upload as on <tt/chiark/. And, in any case, you should get some mail
-reply from the queue daemon what happened to your upload. Hopefully it
-should have been moved to <tt/master/, but in case of errors you're
-notified, too.
+upload as on <tt>chiark</tt>. And, in any case, you should get some
+mail reply from the queue daemon what happened to your
+upload. Hopefully it should have been moved to <tt>master</tt>, but in
+case of errors you're notified, too.
          <p>
-<em/Note:/ Do not upload packages containing software that is
+<em>Note:</em> Do not upload packages containing software that is
 export-controlled by the United States government to the queue on
-<tt/erlangen/.  Since this upload queue goes to <tt/master/, the
+<tt>erlangen</tt>.  Since this upload queue goes to <tt>master</tt>, the
 prescription found in <ref id="upload-master"> applies here as well.
          <p>
-The program <prgn/dupload/ supports uploads to <tt/erlangen/; please refer
-to the documentation that comes with the program for details.
+The program <prgn>dupload</prgn> supports uploads to
+<tt>erlangen</tt>; please refer to the documentation that comes with
+the program for details.
 
 
        <sect1>Uploading to the non-us server
          <p>
-To upload a package to the <em/non-us/ server you just have to
+To upload a package to the <em>non-us</em> server you just have to
 transfer the files via anonymous ftp to <url
 id="ftp://non-us.debian.org/pub/debian-non-US/Incoming">.  Note, that
 the <tt>.changes</tt> file must have a valid PGP signature from one of
@@ -1102,38 +1116,42 @@ the keys of the developers key-ring.
       <sect id="upload-announce">Announcing package uploads
        <p>
 When a package is uploaded an announcement should be posted to one of
-the ``debian-changes'' lists. The announcement should give the (source)
-package name and version number, and a very short summary of the
-changes, in the <em/Subject/ field, and should contain the PGP-signed
-<tt/.changes/ file.  Some additional explanatory text may be added
-before the start of the <tt/.changes/ file.
+the ``debian-changes'' lists. The announcement should give the
+(source) package name and version number, and a very short summary of
+the changes, in the <em>Subject</em> field, and should contain the
+PGP-signed <tt>.changes</tt> file.  Some additional explanatory text
+may be added before the start of the <tt>.changes</tt> file.
        <p>
-If a package is released with the <tt/Distribution:/ set to
+If a package is released with the <tt>Distribution:</tt> set to
 `stable', the announcement is sent to
-<email/debian-changes@lists.debian.org/.  If a package is released
-with <tt/Distribution:/ set to `unstable', `experimental', or
-`frozen' (when present), the announcement should be posted to
-<email/debian-devel-changes@lists.debian.org/ instead.
+<email>debian-changes@lists.debian.org</email>.  If a package is
+released with <tt>Distribution:</tt> set to `unstable',
+`experimental', or `frozen' (when present), the announcement should be
+posted to <email>debian-devel-changes@lists.debian.org</email>
+instead.
        <p>
 On occasion, it is necessary to upload a package to both the
-<em/stable/ and <em/unstable/ distributions; this is done by putting
-both distributions in the <tt/Distribution:/ line.  In such a case the
-upload announcement should go to both of the above mailing lists.
+<em>stable</em> and <em>unstable</em> distributions; this is done by
+putting both distributions in the <tt>Distribution:</tt> line.  In
+such a case the upload announcement should go to both of the above
+mailing lists.
        <p>
-The <prgn/dupload/ program is clever enough to determine for itself
+The <prgn>dupload</prgn> program is clever enough to determine for itself
 where the announcement should go, and will automatically mail the
 announcement to the right list.  See <ref id="dupload">.
 
-      <sect id="upload-notification">Notification that a new package has been installed
+      <sect id="upload-notification">
+       <heading>Notification that a new package has been installed</heading>
        <p>
 The Debian archive maintainers are responsible for handling package
 uploads.  For the most part, uploads are automatically handled on a
-daily basis by an archive maintenance tool called <prgn/dinstall/.
-Specifically, updates to existing packages to the `unstable'
-distribution are handled automatically. In other cases, notably new
-packages, placing the uploaded package into the distribution is
-handled manually. When uploads are handled manually, the change to the
-archive may take up to a week to occur (please be patient).
+daily basis by an archive maintenance tool called
+<prgn>dinstall</prgn>.  Specifically, updates to existing packages to
+the `unstable' distribution are handled automatically. In other cases,
+notably new packages, placing the uploaded package into the
+distribution is handled manually. When uploads are handled manually,
+the change to the archive may take up to a week to occur (please be
+patient).
        <p>
 In any case, you will receive notification indicating that the package
 has been uploaded via email.  Please examine this notification
@@ -1142,22 +1160,22 @@ you thought you set it to go into.  Read on for why.
 
        <sect1 id="override-file">The override file
          <p>
-The <file>debian/control</file> file's <tt/Section/ and <tt/Priority/
-fields do not actually specify where the file will be placed in the
-archive, nor its priority.  In order to retain the overall integrity
-of the archive, it is the archive maintainers who have control over
-these fields.  The values in the <file>debian/control</file> file are
-actually just hints.
+The <file>debian/control</file> file's <tt>Section</tt> and
+<tt>Priority</tt> fields do not actually specify where the file will
+be placed in the archive, nor its priority.  In order to retain the
+overall integrity of the archive, it is the archive maintainers who
+have control over these fields.  The values in the
+<file>debian/control</file> file are actually just hints.
          <p>
 The archive maintainers keep track of the canonical sections and
-priorities for packages in the <em/override file/.  Sometimes the
-<em/override file/ needs correcting.  Simply changing the package's
-<file>control</file> file is not going to work.  Instead, you should email
-<email/override-change@debian.org/ or submit a bug against
-<package/ftp.debian.org/.
+priorities for packages in the <em>override file</em>.  Sometimes the
+<em>override file</em> needs correcting.  Simply changing the
+package's <file>control</file> file is not going to work.  Instead,
+you should email <email>override-change@debian.org</email> or submit a
+bug against <package>ftp.debian.org</package>.
          <p>
-For more information about <em/override files/, see
-<manref name="dpkg-scanpackages" section="8"/>,
+For more information about <em>override files</em>, see <manref
+name="dpkg-scanpackages" section="8">,
 <file>/usr/doc/debian/bug-log-mailserver.txt</file>, and
 <file>/usr/doc/debian/bug-maint-info.txt</file>.
 
@@ -1188,7 +1206,7 @@ and ``source NMU''.  These terms are used with specific technical
 meaning throughout this document.  Both binary and source NMUs are
 similar, since they involve an upload of a package by a developer who
 is not the official maintainer of that package.  That is why it's a
-<em/non-maintainer/ upload.
+<em>non-maintainer</em> upload.
        <p>
 A source NMU is a upload of a package by a developer who is not the
 official maintainer, for the purposes of fixing a bug in the package.
@@ -1293,7 +1311,7 @@ not change the name of modules or files, do not move directories; in
 general, do not fix things which are not broken.  Keep the patch as
 small as possible.  If things bother you aesthetically, talk to the
 Debian maintainer, talk to the upstream maintainer, or submit a bug.
-However, aesthetic changes must <em/not/ be made in a non-maintainer
+However, aesthetic changes must <em>not</em> be made in a non-maintainer
 upload.
 
 
@@ -1304,31 +1322,31 @@ the version number needs to change.  This enables our packing system
 to function.
          <p>
 If you are doing a non-maintainer upload (NMU), you should add a new
-minor version number to the <var/debian-revision/ part of the version
-number (the portion after the last hyphen).  This extra minor number
-will start at `1'.  For example, consider the package `foo', which is
-at version 1.1-3.  In the archive, the source package control file
-would be <file>foo_1.1-3.dsc</file>.  The upstream version is `1.1' and
-the Debian revision is `3'.  The next NMU would add a new minor number
-`.1' to the Debian revision; the new source control file would be
-<file>foo_1.1-3.1.dsc</file>.
+minor version number to the <var>debian-revision</var> part of the
+version number (the portion after the last hyphen).  This extra minor
+number will start at `1'.  For example, consider the package `foo',
+which is at version 1.1-3.  In the archive, the source package control
+file would be <file>foo_1.1-3.dsc</file>.  The upstream version is
+`1.1' and the Debian revision is `3'.  The next NMU would add a new
+minor number `.1' to the Debian revision; the new source control file
+would be <file>foo_1.1-3.1.dsc</file>.
          <p>
 The Debian revision minor number is needed to avoid stealing one of
 the package maintainer's version numbers, which might disrupt their
 work.  It also has the benefit of making it visually clear that a
 package in the archive was not made by the official maintainer.
          <p>
-If there is no <var/debian-revision/ component in the version number
-then one should be created, starting at `0.1'.  If it is absolutely
-necessary for someone other than the usual maintainer to make a
-release based on a new upstream version then the person making the
-release should start with the <var/debian-revision/ value `0.1'.  The
-usual maintainer of a package should start their <var/debian-revision/
-numbering at `1'.  Note that if you do this, you'll have to invoke
-<prgn>dpkg-buildpackage</prgn> with the <tt/-sa/ switch to force the
-build system to pick up the new source package (normally it only looks
-for Debian revisions of '0' or '1' -- it's not yet clever enough to
-know about `0.1').
+If there is no <var>debian-revision</var> component in the version
+number then one should be created, starting at `0.1'.  If it is
+absolutely necessary for someone other than the usual maintainer to
+make a release based on a new upstream version then the person making
+the release should start with the <var>debian-revision</var> value
+`0.1'.  The usual maintainer of a package should start their
+<var>debian-revision</var> numbering at `1'.  Note that if you do
+this, you'll have to invoke <prgn>dpkg-buildpackage</prgn> with the
+<tt>-sa</tt> switch to force the build system to pick up the new
+source package (normally it only looks for Debian revisions of '0' or
+'1' -- it's not yet clever enough to know about `0.1').
          <p>
 Remember, porters who are simply recompiling a package for a different
 architecture do not need to renumber.  Porters should use new version
@@ -1337,52 +1355,54 @@ in some way, i.e., if they are doing a source NMU and not a binary
 NMU.
 
 
-       <sect1 id="nmu-changelog">Source NMUs must have a new changelog entry
+       <sect1 id="nmu-changelog">
+         <heading>Source NMUs must have a new changelog entry</heading>
          <p>
 A non-maintainer doing a source NMU must create a changelog entry,
 describing which bugs are fixed by the NMU, and generally why the NMU
 was required and what it fixed.  The changelog entry will have the
 non-maintainer's email address in the log entry and the NMU version
-number in it.
+number in it.</p>
          <p>
 By convention, source NMU changelog entries start with the line
 <example>
   * Non-maintainer upload
-</example>
+</example></p></sect1>
 
 
        <sect1 id="nmu-patch">Source NMUs and the Bug Tracking System
          <p>
 Maintainers other than the official package maintainer should make as
 few changes to the package as possible, and they should always send a
-patch as a unified context diff (<tt/diff -u/) detailing their
+patch as a unified context diff (<tt>diff -u</tt>) detailing their
 changes to the Bug Tracking System.
          <p>
 What if you are simply recompiling the package?  In this case, the
 process is different for porters than it is for non-porters, as
 mentioned above.  If you are not a porter and are doing an NMU that
 simply requires a recompile (i.e., a new shared library is available
-to be linked against, a bug was fixed in <package/debhelper/), there
-must still be a changelog entry; therefore, there will be a patch.  If
-you are a porter, you are probably just doing a binary NMU.  (Note:
-this leaves out in the cold porters who have to do recompiles -- chalk
-it up as a weakness in how we maintain our archive.)
+to be linked against, a bug was fixed in
+<package>debhelper</package>), there must still be a changelog entry;
+therefore, there will be a patch.  If you are a porter, you are
+probably just doing a binary NMU.  (Note: this leaves out in the cold
+porters who have to do recompiles -- chalk it up as a weakness in how
+we maintain our archive.)
          <p>
 If the source NMU (non-maintainer upload) fixes some existing bugs,
 the bugs in the Bug Tracking System which are fixed need to be
-<em/notified/ but not actually <em/closed/ by the non-maintainer.
-Technically, only the official package maintainer or the original bug
-submitter are allowed to close bugs.  However, the person making the
-non-maintainer release must send a short message to the relevant bugs 
-explaining that the bugs have been
-fixed by the NMU.  Using <email/control@bugs.debian.org/, the party
-doing the NMU should also set the severity of the bugs fixed in the
-NMU to `fixed'.  This ensures that everyone knows that the bug was
-fixed in an NMU; however the bug is left open until the changes in the
-NMU are incorporated officially into the package by the official
-package maintainer.  Also, open a bug with the patches needed to 
-fix the problem, or make sure that one of the other (already open) bugs
-has the patches.
+<em>notified</em> but not actually <em>closed</em> by the
+non-maintainer.  Technically, only the official package maintainer or
+the original bug submitter are allowed to close bugs.  However, the
+person making the non-maintainer release must send a short message to
+the relevant bugs explaining that the bugs have been fixed by the NMU.
+Using <email>control@bugs.debian.org</email>, the party doing the NMU
+should also set the severity of the bugs fixed in the NMU to `fixed'.
+This ensures that everyone knows that the bug was fixed in an NMU;
+however the bug is left open until the changes in the NMU are
+incorporated officially into the package by the official package
+maintainer.  Also, open a bug with the patches needed to fix the
+problem, or make sure that one of the other (already open) bugs has
+the patches.
          <p>
 The normal maintainer will either apply the patch or employ an
 alternate method of fixing the problem.  Sometimes bugs are fixed
@@ -1392,8 +1412,8 @@ but to release a new version, the maintainer needs to ensure that the
 new upstream version really fixes each problem that was fixed in the
 non-maintainer release.
          <p>
-In addition, the normal maintainer should <em/always/ retain the entry
-in the changelog file documenting the non-maintainer upload.
+In addition, the normal maintainer should <em>always</em> retain the
+entry in the changelog file documenting the non-maintainer upload.
 
 
        <sect1 id="nmu-build">Building source NMUs
@@ -1404,10 +1424,10 @@ same rules as found in <ref id="upload-dist">.  Just as described in
 fact, all the prescriptions from <ref id="upload"> apply, including
 the need to announce the NMU to the proper lists.
          <p>
-Make sure you do <em/not/ change the value of the maintainer in the
-<file>debian/control</file> file.  Your name from the NMU entry of the
-<file>debian/changelog</file> file will be used for signing the changes
-file.
+Make sure you do <em>not</em> change the value of the maintainer in
+the <file>debian/control</file> file.  Your name from the NMU entry of
+the <file>debian/changelog</file> file will be used for signing the
+changes file.
 
 
 
@@ -1499,11 +1519,11 @@ In a binary NMU, no real changes are being made to the source.  You do
 not need to touch any of the files in the source package.  This
 includes <file>debian/changelog</file>.
        <p>
-The way to invoke <prgn/dpkg-buildpackage/ is as <tt>dpkg-buildpackage
--B -m<var/porter-email/</tt>.  Of course, set <var/porter-email/ to
-your email address.  This will do a binary-only build of only the
-architecture-dependant portions of the package, using the
-`binary-arch' target in <file>debian/rules</file>.
+The way to invoke <prgn>dpkg-buildpackage</prgn> is as
+<tt>dpkg-buildpackage -B -m<var>porter-email</var></tt>.  Of course,
+set <var>porter-email</var> to your email address.  This will do a
+binary-only build of only the architecture-dependant portions of the
+package, using the `binary-arch' target in <file>debian/rules</file>.
 
 
        <sect1 id="source-nmu-when-porter">
@@ -1518,7 +1538,7 @@ packages.
 Again, the situation varies depending on the distribution they are
 uploading to.  Crucial fixes (i.e., changes need to get a source
 package to compile for a released-targeted architecture) can be
-uploaded with <em/no/ waiting period for the `frozen' distribution.
+uploaded with <em>no</em> waiting period for the `frozen' distribution.
          <p>
 However, if you are a porter doing an NMU for `unstable', the above
 guidelines for porting should be followed, with two variations.
@@ -1560,28 +1580,28 @@ documentation or references for full information.
        <sect1 id="quinn-diff">
          <heading><package>quinn-diff</package>
          <p>
-<package/quinn-diff/ is used to locate the differences from one
-architecture to another.  For instance, it could tell you which
-packages need to be ported for architecture <var/Y/, based on
-architecture <var/X/.
+<package>quinn-diff</package> is used to locate the differences from
+one architecture to another.  For instance, it could tell you which
+packages need to be ported for architecture <var>Y</var>, based on
+architecture <var>X</var>.
 
 
        <sect1 id="buildd">
          <heading><package>buildd</package>
          <p>
-The <package/buildd/ system is used as a distributed, client-server
-build distribution system.  It is usually used in conjunction with
-<em/auto-builders/, which are ``slave'' hosts which simply check out
-and attempt to auto-build packages which need to be ported.  There is
-also an email interface to the system, which allows porters to ``check
-out'' a source package (usually one which cannot yet be autobuilt) and
-work on it.
+The <package>buildd</package> system is used as a distributed,
+client-server build distribution system.  It is usually used in
+conjunction with <em>auto-builders</em>, which are ``slave'' hosts
+which simply check out and attempt to auto-build packages which need
+to be ported.  There is also an email interface to the system, which
+allows porters to ``check out'' a source package (usually one which
+cannot yet be autobuilt) and work on it.
          <p>
-<package/buildd/ is not yet available as a package; however, most
-porting efforts are either using it currently or planning to use it in
-the near future.  It collects a number of as yet unpackaged components
-which are currently very useful and in use continually, such as
-<prgn/sbuild/ and <prgn/wanna-build/.
+<package>buildd</package> is not yet available as a package; however,
+most porting efforts are either using it currently or planning to use
+it in the near future.  It collects a number of as yet unpackaged
+components which are currently very useful and in use continually,
+such as <prgn>sbuild</prgn> and <prgn>wanna-build</prgn>.
          <p>
 We are very excited about this system, since it potentially has so
 many uses.  Independent development groups can use the system for
@@ -1603,8 +1623,9 @@ enhanced to support cross-compiling.
 
 
 
-    <chapt id="archive-manip"><heading>Moving, Removing, Renaming,
-      Adopting, and Orphaning Packages</heading>
+    <chapt id="archive-manip">
+      <heading>Moving, Removing, Renaming, Adopting, and Orphaning
+      Packages</heading>
       <p>
 Some archive manipulation operation are not automated in the Debian
 upload process.  These procedures should be manually followed by
@@ -1623,35 +1644,35 @@ Manual"> for guidelines).
 In this case, it is sufficient to edit the package control information
 normally and re-upload the package (see the <url
 id="http://www.debian.org/doc/packaging-manuals/packaging.html/"
-name="Debian Packaging Manual"> for
-details).  Carefully examine the installation log sent to you when the
-package is installed into the archive.  If for some reason the old
-location of the package remains, file a bug against
-<tt/ftp.debian.org/ asking that the old location be removed.  Give
-details on what you did, since it might be a <prgn/dinstall/ bug.
+name="Debian Packaging Manual"> for details).  Carefully examine the
+installation log sent to you when the package is installed into the
+archive.  If for some reason the old location of the package remains,
+file a bug against <tt>ftp.debian.org</tt> asking that the old
+location be removed.  Give details on what you did, since it might be
+a <prgn>dinstall</prgn> bug.
 
 
       <sect>Removing packages
        <p>
 If for some reason you want to completely remove a package (say, if it
 is an old compatibility library which is not longer required), you
-need to file a bug against <tt/ftp.debian.org/ asking that the
+need to file a bug against <tt>ftp.debian.org</tt> asking that the
 package be removed.  Make sure you indicate which distribution the
 package should be removed from.
        <p>
 If in doubt concerning whether a package is disposable, email
-<email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ asking for opinions.  Also of
-interest is the <prgn/apt-cache/ program from the <package/apt/
-package.  When invoked as <tt>apt-cache showpkg
-/var/cache/apt/pkgcache.bin <var/package/</tt>, the program will show
-details for <var/package/, including reverse depends.
+<email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> asking for opinions.
+Also of interest is the <prgn>apt-cache</prgn> program from the
+<package>apt</package> package.  When invoked as <tt>apt-cache showpkg
+/var/cache/apt/pkgcache.bin <var>package</var></tt>, the program will
+show details for <var>package</var>, including reverse depends.
 
-       <sect1>Removing packages from <tt/Incoming/
+       <sect1>Removing packages from <tt>Incoming</tt>
          <p>
-If you decide to remove a package from <tt/Incoming/, it is nice but
-not required to send a notification of that to the appropriate
-announce list (either <email/debian-changes@lists.debian.org/ or
-<email/debian-devel-changes@lists.debian.org/).
+If you decide to remove a package from <tt>Incoming</tt>, it is nice
+but not required to send a notification of that to the appropriate
+announce list (either <email>debian-changes@lists.debian.org</email>
+or <email>debian-devel-changes@lists.debian.org</email>).
 
       <sect>Replacing or renaming packages
        <p>
@@ -1662,7 +1683,7 @@ obsolete name of the package (see the <url
 id="http://www.debian.org/doc/packaging-manuals/packaging.html/"
 name="Debian Packaging Manual"> for details).  Once you've uploaded
 that package, and the package has moved into the archive, file a bug
-against <tt/ftp.debian.org/ asking to remove the package with the
+against <tt>ftp.debian.org</tt> asking to remove the package with the
 obsolete name.
 
 
@@ -1672,16 +1693,16 @@ obsolete name.
 If you can no longer maintain a package, then you should set the
 package maintainer to <tt>Debian QA Group
 &lt;debian-qa@lists.debian.org&gt;</tt> and email
-<email/wnpp@debian.org/ indicating that the package is now orphaned.
-If the package is especially crucial to Debian, you should instead
-email <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ asking for a new
-maintainer.
+<email>wnpp@debian.org</email> indicating that the package is now
+orphaned.  If the package is especially crucial to Debian, you should
+instead email <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> asking for
+a new maintainer.
 
 
       <sect id="adopting">Adopting a package
        <p>
 Periodically, a listing of packages in need of new maintainers will be
-sent to <email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> list. This list
+sent to <email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> list. This list
 is also available at in the Work-Needing and Prospective Packages
 document (WNPP), <url
 id="ftp://ftp.debian.org/debian/doc/package-developer/prospective-packages.html">
@@ -1689,7 +1710,7 @@ and at <url id="http://www.debian.org/doc/prospective-packages.html">.
 If you wish to take over maintenance of any of the packages listed in
 the WNPP, or if you can no longer maintain a packages you have, or you
 simply want to know if any one is working on a new package, send a
-message to <email/wnpp@debian.org/.
+message to <email>wnpp@debian.org</email>.
        <p>
 It is not OK to simply take over a package that you feel is neglected
 -- that would be package hijacking.  You can, of course, contact the
@@ -1698,15 +1719,15 @@ However, without their assent, you may not take over the package.
 Even if they ignore you, that is still not grounds to take over a
 package.  If you really feel that a maintainer has gone AWOL (absent
 without leave), post a query to
-<email/debian-private@lists.debian.org/.
+<email>debian-private@lists.debian.org</email>.
        <p>
 If you take over an old package, you probably want to be listed as the
 package's official maintainer in the bug system. This will happen
 automatically once you upload a new version with an updated
-<tt/Maintainer:/ field, although it can take a couple of weeks. If you
-do not expect to upload a new version for a while, send an email to
-<email/override-change@debian.org/ so that bug reports will go to you
-right away.
+<tt>Maintainer:</tt> field, although it can take a couple of weeks. If
+you do not expect to upload a new version for a while, send an email
+to <email>override-change@debian.org</email> so that bug reports will
+go to you right away.
 
 
 
@@ -1717,14 +1738,14 @@ right away.
        <p>
 If you want to be a good maintainer, you should periodically check the
 <url id="http://www.debian.org/Bugs/" name="Debian bug tracking system
-(BTS)"> for your packages.  The BTS contains all the open bugs against 
+(BTS)"> for your packages.  The BTS contains all the open bugs against
 your packages.
        <p>
 Maintainers interact with the BTS via email addresses at
-<tt/bugs.debian.org/.  Documentation on available commands can be
+<tt>bugs.debian.org</tt>.  Documentation on available commands can be
 found at <url id="http://www.debian.org/Bugs/">, or, if you have
-installed the <package/debian-doc/ package, you can look at the local
-files <file>/usr/doc/debian/bug-*</file>.
+installed the <package>debian-doc</package> package, you can look at
+the local files <file>/usr/doc/debian/bug-*</file>.
        <p>
 Some find it useful to get periodic reports on open bugs.  You can add
 a cron job such as the following if you want to get a weekly email
@@ -1777,20 +1798,21 @@ notification that your updated package has been installed into the
 archive, you can and should close the bug in the BTS.
        <p>
 Again, see the BTS documentation for details on how to do this.
-Often, it is sufficient to mail the <tt/.changes file to
-<email/<var/XXX/-done@bugs.debian.org/, where <var/XXX/ is your bug
-number.
+Often, it is sufficient to mail the <tt>.changes</tt> file to
+<email>XXX-done@bugs.debian.org</email>, where <var>XXX</var> is your
+bug number.
 
 
       <sect id="lintian-reports">Lintian reports
        <p>
-You should periodically get the new <package/lintian/ from `unstable' and
-check over all your packages.  Alternatively you can check for your
-maintainer email address at the <url
+You should periodically get the new <package>lintian</package> from
+`unstable' and check over all your packages.  Alternatively you can
+check for your maintainer email address at the <url
 id="http://www.debian.org/lintian/" name="online lintian report">.
-That report, which is updated automatically, contains <prgn/lintian/
-reports against the latest version of the distribution (usually from
-'unstable') using the latest <package/lintian/.
+That report, which is updated automatically, contains
+<prgn>lintian</prgn> reports against the latest version of the
+distribution (usually from 'unstable') using the latest
+<package>lintian</package>.
 
 
       <sect>Reporting lots of bugs at once
@@ -1799,20 +1821,21 @@ Reporting a great number of bugs for the same problem on a great
 number of different packages -- i.e., more than 10 -- is a deprecated
 practice.  Take all possible steps to avoid submitting bulk bugs at
 all.  For instance, if checking for the problem can be automated, add
-a new check to <package/lintian/ so that an error or warning is
-emitted.
+a new check to <package>lintian</package> so that an error or warning
+is emitted.
        <p>
 If you report more than 10 bugs on the same topic at once, it is
 recommended that you send a message to
-<email/debian-devel@lists.debian.org/ describing your intention before
-submitting the report. This will allow other developers to verify that
-the bug is a real problem. In addition, it will help prevent a
-situation in which several maintainers start filing the same bug
-report simultaneously.
+<email>debian-devel@lists.debian.org</email> describing your intention
+before submitting the report. This will allow other developers to
+verify that the bug is a real problem. In addition, it will help
+prevent a situation in which several maintainers start filing the same
+bug report simultaneously.
        <p>
 Note that when sending lots of bugs on the same subject, you should
-send the bug report to <email/maintonly@bugs.debian.org/ so that the
-bug report is not forwarded to the bug distribution mailing list.
+send the bug report to <email>maintonly@bugs.debian.org</email> so
+that the bug report is not forwarded to the bug distribution mailing
+list.
 
 
     <chapt id="tools">Overview of Debian Maintainer Tools
@@ -1834,50 +1857,51 @@ the package documentation itself.
 
 
       <sect id="dpkg-dev">
-       <heading><package/dpkg-dev/
+       <heading><package>dpkg-dev</package>
        <p>
-<package/dpkg-dev/ contains the tools (including
-<prgn/dpkg-source/) required to unpack, build and upload Debian source
-packages.  These utilities contain the fundamental, low-level
+<package>dpkg-dev</package> contains the tools (including
+<prgn>dpkg-source</prgn>) required to unpack, build and upload Debian
+source packages.  These utilities contain the fundamental, low-level
 functionality required to create and manipulated packages; as such,
 they are required for any Debian maintainer.
 
 
       <sect id="lintian">
-       <heading><package/lintian/
+       <heading><package>lintian</package>
        <p>
-<package/Lintian/ dissects Debian packages and reports bugs and
-policy violations. It contains automated checks for many aspects of
-Debian policy as well as some checks for common errors.  The use of
-<package/lintian/ has already been discussed in <ref
+<package>Lintian</package> dissects Debian packages and reports bugs
+and policy violations. It contains automated checks for many aspects
+of Debian policy as well as some checks for common errors.  The use of
+<package>lintian</package> has already been discussed in <ref
 id="upload-checking"> and <ref id="lintian-reports">.
 
 
       <sect id="debhelper">
-       <heading><package/debhelper/
+       <heading><package>debhelper</package>
        <p>
-<package/debhelper/ is a collection of programs that can be used in
-<file>debian/rules</file> to automate common tasks related to building
-binary Debian packages. Programs are included to install various files
-into your package, compress files, fix file permissions, integrate
-your package with the Debian menu system.
+<package>debhelper</package> is a collection of programs that can be
+used in <file>debian/rules</file> to automate common tasks related to
+building binary Debian packages. Programs are included to install
+various files into your package, compress files, fix file permissions,
+integrate your package with the Debian menu system.
        <p>
-Unlike <package/debmake/, <package/debhelper/ is broken into
-several small, granular commands which act in a consistent manner.  As
-such, it allows a greater granularity of control than
-<package/debmake/.
+Unlike <package>debmake</package>, <package>debhelper</package> is
+broken into several small, granular commands which act in a consistent
+manner.  As such, it allows a greater granularity of control than
+<package>debmake</package>.
 
 
       <sect id="debmake">
-       <heading><package/debmake/
+       <heading><package>debmake</package>
        <p>
-<package/debmake/, a pre-cursor to <package/debhelper/, is a
-less granular <file>debian/rules</file> assistant. It includes two main
-programs: <prgn>deb-make</prgn>, which can be used to help a
-maintainer convert a regular (non-Debian) source archive into a Debian
-source package; and <prgn>debstd</prgn>, which incorporates in one big
-shot the same sort of automated functions that one finds in
-<package/debhelper/.
+<package>debmake</package>, a pre-cursor to
+<package>debhelper</package>, is a less granular
+<file>debian/rules</file> assistant. It includes two main programs:
+<prgn>deb-make</prgn>, which can be used to help a maintainer convert
+a regular (non-Debian) source archive into a Debian source package;
+and <prgn>debstd</prgn>, which incorporates in one big shot the same
+sort of automated functions that one finds in
+<package>debhelper</package>.
        <p>
 The consensus is that <package>debmake</package> is now deprecated in
 favor of <package>debhelper</package>.  However, it's not a bug to use
@@ -1885,27 +1909,27 @@ favor of <package>debhelper</package>.  However, it's not a bug to use
 
 
       <sect id="cvs-buildpackage">
-       <heading><package/cvs-buildpackage/
+       <heading><package>cvs-buildpackage</package>
        <p>
-<package/cvs-buildpackage/ provides the capability to inject or
-import Debian source packages into a CVS repository, build a Debian
+<package>cvs-buildpackage</package> provides the capability to inject
+or import Debian source packages into a CVS repository, build a Debian
 package from the CVS repository, and helps in integrating upstream
 changes into the repository.
        <p>
 These utilities provide an infrastructure to facilitate the use of CVS
 by Debian maintainers. This allows one to keep separate CVS branches
-of a package for <em/stable/, <em/unstable/, and possibly
-<em/experimental/ distributions, along with the other benefits of a
-version control system.
+of a package for <em>stable</em>, <em>unstable</em>, and possibly
+<em>experimental</em> distributions, along with the other benefits of
+version control system.
 
 
       <sect id="dupload">
        <heading><package>dupload</package>
        <p>
-<package/dupload/ is a package and a script to automagically upload
-Debian packages to the Debian archive, to log the upload, and to send
-mail about the upload of a package.  You can configure it for new
-upload locations or methods.
+<package>dupload</package> is a package and a script to automagically
+upload Debian packages to the Debian archive, to log the upload, and
+to send mail about the upload of a package.  You can configure it for
+new upload locations or methods.
 
 
       <sect id="fakeroot">