chiark / gitweb /
included fixes from bug #80740; described testing; described package pools (this...
authorjoy <joy@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Thu, 28 Dec 2000 22:00:20 +0000 (22:00 +0000)
committerjoy <joy@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Thu, 28 Dec 2000 22:00:20 +0000 (22:00 +0000)
git-svn-id: svn://anonscm.debian.org/ddp/manuals/trunk/developers-reference@1077 313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d

developers-reference.sgml

index 4149d20..3cc79e0 100644 (file)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
   <!-- common, language independant entities -->
   <!entity % commondata  SYSTEM "common.ent" > %commondata;
   <!-- CVS revision of this document -->
   <!-- common, language independant entities -->
   <!entity % commondata  SYSTEM "common.ent" > %commondata;
   <!-- CVS revision of this document -->
-  <!entity cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.46 $">
+  <!entity cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.47 $">
 
   <!-- if you are translating this document, please notate the RCS
        revision of the developers reference here -->
 
   <!-- if you are translating this document, please notate the RCS
        revision of the developers reference here -->
@@ -270,7 +270,7 @@ post to that list and an experienced developer will volunteer to help.
 There's a LDAP database containing many informations concerning all
 developers, you can access it at <url id="&url-debian-db;">. You can
 update your password (this password is propagated to most of the machines
 There's a LDAP database containing many informations concerning all
 developers, you can access it at <url id="&url-debian-db;">. You can
 update your password (this password is propagated to most of the machines
-that are accessible to you), your adress, your country, the latitude and
+that are accessible to you), your address, your country, the latitude and
 longitude of the point where you live, phone and fax numbers, your
 preferred shell, your IRC nickname, your web page and the email that
 you're using as alias for your debian.org email. Most of the information
 longitude of the point where you live, phone and fax numbers, your
 preferred shell, your IRC nickname, your web page and the email that
 you're using as alias for your debian.org email. Most of the information
@@ -303,8 +303,9 @@ Most developers take vacations, and usually this means that they can't
 work for Debian and they can't be reached by email if any problem occurs.
 The other developers need to know that you're on vacation so that they'll
 do whatever is needed when such a problem occurs. Usually this means that
 work for Debian and they can't be reached by email if any problem occurs.
 The other developers need to know that you're on vacation so that they'll
 do whatever is needed when such a problem occurs. Usually this means that
-other developers are allowed to NMU your package if a big problem (release
-critical bugs, security update, ...) occurs while you're on vacation.
+other developers are allowed to NMU (see <ref id="nmu">) your package if a
+big problem (release critical bugs, security update, ...) occurs while
+you're on vacation.
        <p>
 In order to inform the other developers, there's two things that you should do.
 First send a mail to &email-debian-private; giving the period of time when
        <p>
 In order to inform the other developers, there's two things that you should do.
 First send a mail to &email-debian-private; giving the period of time when
@@ -348,10 +349,10 @@ you can't fix such bugs within 2 weeks, you should either ask for help
 by sending a mail to the Quality Assurance (QA) group
 (&email-debian-qa;) or justify yourself and present your plan to fix
 it by sending a mail to the bug concerned report. Otherwise people
 by sending a mail to the Quality Assurance (QA) group
 (&email-debian-qa;) or justify yourself and present your plan to fix
 it by sending a mail to the bug concerned report. Otherwise people
-from the QA group may want to do a Non Maintainer Upload (NMU) after
-trying to contact you (they might not wait as long as usual before
-they do their NMU if they have seen no recent activity from you on the
-BTS).
+from the QA group may want to do a Non-Maintainer Upload (see
+<ref id="nmu">) after trying to contact you (they might not wait as long as
+usual before they do their NMU if they have seen no recent activity from you
+on the BTS).
 
       <sect id="qa-effort">Quality Assurance Effort
        <p>
 
       <sect id="qa-effort">Quality Assurance Effort
        <p>
@@ -406,12 +407,7 @@ request to be copied.  Anyone who posts to a mailing list should read
 it to see the responses.
        <p>
 The following are the core Debian mailing lists: &email-debian-devel;,
 it to see the responses.
        <p>
 The following are the core Debian mailing lists: &email-debian-devel;,
-&email-debian-policy;, &email-debian-user;
-
-<!-- FIXME: &email-debian-user; results in same as does -->
-<!-- &email-debian-policy; - possibly an error in common.ent? -->
-
-, &email-debian-private;,
+&email-debian-policy;, &email-debian-user;, &email-debian-private;,
 &email-debian-announce;, and &email-debian-devel-announce;.  All
 developers are expected to be subscribed to at least
 &email-debian-private; and &email-debian-devel-announce;.  There are
 &email-debian-announce;, and &email-debian-devel-announce;.  All
 developers are expected to be subscribed to at least
 &email-debian-private; and &email-debian-devel-announce;.  There are
@@ -569,35 +565,45 @@ The Debian GNU/Linux distribution consists of a lot of Debian packages
 (<tt>.deb</tt>'s, currently around &number-of-pkgs;) and a few
 additional files (documentation, installation disk images, etc.).
        <p>
 (<tt>.deb</tt>'s, currently around &number-of-pkgs;) and a few
 additional files (documentation, installation disk images, etc.).
        <p>
-Here is an example directory tree of a complete Debian distribution:
+Here is an example directory tree of a complete Debian archive:
        <p>
 &sample-dist-dirtree;
        <p>
        <p>
 &sample-dist-dirtree;
        <p>
-As you can see, the top-level directory of the distribution contains
-three directories, namely <em>main</em>, <em>contrib</em>, and
-<em>non-free</em>. These directories are called <em>sections</em>.
-       <p>
-In each section, there is a directory with the source packages
-(source), a directory for each supported architecture
+As you can see, the top-level directory contains two directories,
+<tt>dists/</tt> and <tt>pool/</tt>. The latter is a ``pool'' in which the
+packages actually are, and which is handled by the archive maintenance
+database and the accompanying programs. The former contains the
+distributions, <em>stable</em>, <em>testing</em> and <em>unstable</em>.
+Each of those distribution directories is divided in equivalent
+subdirectories purpose of which is equal, so we will only explain how it
+looks in stable. The <tt>Packages</tt> and <tt>Sources</tt> files in the
+distribution subdirectories can reference files in the <tt>pool/</tt>
+directory.
+       <p>
+<tt>dists/stable</tt> contains three directories, namely <em>main</em>,
+<em>contrib</em>, and <em>non-free</em>.
+       <p>
+In each of the areas, there is a directory with the source packages
+(<tt>source</tt>), a directory for each supported architecture
 (<tt>binary-i386</tt>, <tt>binary-m68k</tt>, etc.), and a directory
 for architecture independent packages (<tt>binary-all</tt>).
        <p>
 (<tt>binary-i386</tt>, <tt>binary-m68k</tt>, etc.), and a directory
 for architecture independent packages (<tt>binary-all</tt>).
        <p>
-The <em>main</em> section contains additional directories which holds
+The <em>main</em> area contains additional directories which holds
 the disk images and some essential pieces of documentation required
 for installing the Debian distribution on a specific architecture
 (<tt>disks-i386</tt>, <tt>disks-m68k</tt>, etc.).
        <p>
 the disk images and some essential pieces of documentation required
 for installing the Debian distribution on a specific architecture
 (<tt>disks-i386</tt>, <tt>disks-m68k</tt>, etc.).
        <p>
-The <em>binary</em> and <em>source</em> directories are divided
+The <em>binary-*</em> and <em>source</em> directories are divided
 further into <em>subsections</em>.
 
 
       <sect>Sections
        <p>
 further into <em>subsections</em>.
 
 
       <sect>Sections
        <p>
-The <em>main</em> section is what makes up the <em>official Debian
-GNU/Linux distribution</em>.  The <em>main</em> section is official
-because it fully complies with all our guidelines.  The other two
-sections do not, to different degrees; as such, they are not
-officially part of Debian.
+The <em>main</em> section of the Debian archive is what makes up the
+<strong>official Debian GNU/Linux distribution</strong>.
+The <em>main</em> section is official because it fully complies with
+all our guidelines.  The other two sections do not, to different degrees;
+as such, they are <strong>not</strong> officially part of Debian GNU/Linux.
        <p>
 Every package in the main section must fully comply with the <url
 id="&url-dfsg;" name="Debian Free Software Guidelines"> (DFSG) and
        <p>
 Every package in the main section must fully comply with the <url
 id="&url-dfsg;" name="Debian Free Software Guidelines"> (DFSG) and
@@ -606,16 +612,16 @@ id="&url-debian-policy;" name="Debian Policy Manual">.  The DFSG is
 our definition of ``free software.'' Check out the Debian Policy
 Manual for details.
        <p>
 our definition of ``free software.'' Check out the Debian Policy
 Manual for details.
        <p>
+Packages in the <em>contrib</em> section have to comply with the DFSG,
+but may fail other requirements.  For instance, they may depend on
+non-free packages.
+       <p>
 Packages which do not apply to the DFSG are placed in the
 <em>non-free</em> section. These packages are not considered as part
 of the Debian distribution, though we support their use, and we
 provide infrastructure (such as our bug-tracking system and mailing
 lists) for non-free software packages.
        <p>
 Packages which do not apply to the DFSG are placed in the
 <em>non-free</em> section. These packages are not considered as part
 of the Debian distribution, though we support their use, and we
 provide infrastructure (such as our bug-tracking system and mailing
 lists) for non-free software packages.
        <p>
-Packages in the <em>contrib</em> section have to comply with the DFSG,
-but may fail other requirements.  For instance, they may depend on
-non-free packages.
-       <p>
 The <url id="&url-debian-policy;" name="Debian Policy Manual">
 contains a more exact definition of the three sections. The above
 discussion is just an introduction.
 The <url id="&url-debian-policy;" name="Debian Policy Manual">
 contains a more exact definition of the three sections. The above
 discussion is just an introduction.
@@ -654,7 +660,7 @@ Debian GNU/Linux 1.3 is only available as <em>i386</em>.  Debian 2.0
 shipped for <em>i386</em> and <em>m68k</em> architectures.  Debian 2.1
 ships for the <em>i386</em>, <em>m68k</em>, <em>alpha</em>, and
 <em>sparc</em> architectures.  Debian 2.2 adds support for the
 shipped for <em>i386</em> and <em>m68k</em> architectures.  Debian 2.1
 ships for the <em>i386</em>, <em>m68k</em>, <em>alpha</em>, and
 <em>sparc</em> architectures.  Debian 2.2 adds support for the
-<em>powerpc</em> architecture.
+<em>powerpc</em> and <em>arm</em> architectures.
        <p>
 Information for developers or uses about the specific ports are
 available at the <url id="&url-debian-ports;" name="Debian Ports web
        <p>
 Information for developers or uses about the specific ports are
 available at the <url id="&url-debian-ports;" name="Debian Ports web
@@ -670,7 +676,11 @@ formally defined, except perhaps the `base' subsection.
 Subsections simply exist to simplify the organization and browsing of
 available packages.  Please check the current Debian distribution to
 see which sections are available.
 Subsections simply exist to simplify the organization and browsing of
 available packages.  Please check the current Debian distribution to
 see which sections are available.
-
+       <p>
+Note however that with the introduction of package pools (see the top-level
+<em>pool/</em> directory), the subsections in the form of subdirectories
+will eventually cease to exist. They will be kept in the packages' `Section'
+header fields, though.
 
       <sect>Packages
        <p>
 
       <sect>Packages
        <p>
@@ -699,10 +709,8 @@ the package (maintainer, version, etc.).
        <p>
 The directory system described in the previous chapter is itself
 contained within <em>distribution directories</em>.  Each
        <p>
 The directory system described in the previous chapter is itself
 contained within <em>distribution directories</em>.  Each
-distribution is contained in the <tt>dists</tt> directory in the
-top-level of the Debian archive itself (the symlinks from the
-top-level directory to the distributions themselves are for backwards
-compatability and are deprecated).
+distribution is actually contained in the <tt>pool</tt> directory in the
+top-level of the Debian archive itself.
        <p>
 To summarize, the Debian archive has a root directory within an FTP
 server.  For instance, at the mirror site,
        <p>
 To summarize, the Debian archive has a root directory within an FTP
 server.  For instance, at the mirror site,
@@ -710,21 +718,18 @@ server.  For instance, at the mirror site,
 contained in <ftppath>/debian</ftppath>, which is a common location
 (another is <ftppath>/pub/debian</ftppath>).
        <p>
 contained in <ftppath>/debian</ftppath>, which is a common location
 (another is <ftppath>/pub/debian</ftppath>).
        <p>
-Within that archive root, the actual distributions are contained in
-the <tt>dists</tt> directory.  Here is an overview of the layout:
-       <p>
-<example>
-<var>archive root</var>/dists/<var>distribution</var>/<var>section</var>/<var>architecture</var>/<var>subsection</var>/<var>packages</var>
-</example>
+A distribution is comprised of Debian source and binary packages, and the
+respective <tt>Sources</tt> and <tt>Packages</tt> index files, containing
+the header information from all those packages. The former are kept in the
+<tt>pool/</tt> directory, while the latter are kept in the <tt>dists/</tt>
+directory of the archive (because of backwards compatibility).
 
 
-Extrapolating from this layout, you know that to find the i386 base
-packages for the distribution <em>slink</em>, you would look in
-<ftppath>/debian/dists/slink/main/binary-i386/base/</ftppath>.
 
 
-       <sect1>Stable, unstable, and sometimes frozen
+       <sect1>Stable, testing, unstable, and sometimes frozen
        <p>
 There is always a distribution called <em>stable</em> (residing in
        <p>
 There is always a distribution called <em>stable</em> (residing in
-<tt>dists/stable</tt>) and one called <em>unstable</em> (residing in
+<tt>dists/stable</tt>), one called <em>testing</em> (residing in
+<tt>dists/testing</tt>), and one called <em>unstable</em> (residing in
 <tt>dists/unstable</tt>). This reflects the development process of the
 Debian project.
        <p>
 <tt>dists/unstable</tt>). This reflects the development process of the
 Debian project.
        <p>
@@ -733,14 +738,26 @@ Active development is done in the <em>unstable</em> distribution
 distribution</em>). Every Debian developer can update his or her
 packages in this distribution at any time. Thus, the contents of this
 distribution change from day-to-day. Since no special effort is done
 distribution</em>). Every Debian developer can update his or her
 packages in this distribution at any time. Thus, the contents of this
 distribution change from day-to-day. Since no special effort is done
-to test this distribution, it is sometimes ``unstable.''
-       <p>
-After a period of development, the <em>unstable</em> distribution is
-copied to a new distribution directory, called <em>frozen</em>.  After
-that has been done, no changes are allowed to the frozen distribution except
+to make sure everything in this distribution is working properly, it is
+sometimes ``unstable.''
+       <p>
+Packages get copied from <em>unstable</em> to <em>testing</em> if they
+satisfy certain criteria. To get into <em>testing</em> distribution, a
+package needs to be in the archive for two weeks and not have any release
+critical bugs. After that period, it will propagate into <em>testing</em>
+as soon as anything it depends on is also added. This process is automatic.
+       <p>
+After a period of development, once the release manager deems fit, the
+<em>testing</em> distribution is renamed to <em>frozen</em>. Once
+that has been done, no changes are allowed to that distribution except
 bug fixes; that's why it's called ``frozen.''  After another month or
 bug fixes; that's why it's called ``frozen.''  After another month or
-a little longer, the <em>frozen</em> distribution is renamed to
-<em>stable</em>, overriding the old <em>stable</em> distribution,
+a little longer, depending on the progress, the <em>frozen</em> distribution
+goes into a `deep freeze', when no changes are made to it except those
+needed for the installation system. This is called a ``test cycle'', and it
+can last up to two weeks. There can be several test cycles, until the
+distribution is prepared for release, as decided by the release manager.
+At the end of the last test cycle, the <em>frozen</em> distribution is
+renamed to <em>stable</em>, overriding the old <em>stable</em> distribution,
 which is removed at that time.
        <p>
 This development cycle is based on the assumption that the
 which is removed at that time.
        <p>
 This development cycle is based on the assumption that the
@@ -757,19 +774,22 @@ and the revision level of the stable distribution is incremented
 (e.g., `1.3' becomes `1.3r1', `2.0r2' becomes `2.0r3', and so forth).
        <p>
 Note that development under <em>unstable</em> continues during the
 (e.g., `1.3' becomes `1.3r1', `2.0r2' becomes `2.0r3', and so forth).
        <p>
 Note that development under <em>unstable</em> continues during the
-``freeze'' period, since a new <em>unstable</em> distribution is be
-created when the older <em>unstable</em> is moved to <em>frozen</em>.
+``freeze'' period, since the <em>unstable</em> distribution remains in
+place when the <em>testing</em> is moved to <em>frozen</em>.
 Another wrinkle is that when the <em>frozen</em> distribution is
 offically released, the old stable distribution is completely removed
 from the Debian archives (although they do live on at
 <tt>archive-host;</tt>).
        <p>
 Another wrinkle is that when the <em>frozen</em> distribution is
 offically released, the old stable distribution is completely removed
 from the Debian archives (although they do live on at
 <tt>archive-host;</tt>).
        <p>
-In summary, there is always a <em>stable</em> and an <em>unstable</em>
-distribution available, and a <em>frozen</em> distribution shows up
-for a month or so from time to time.
+In summary, there is always a <em>stable</em>, a <em>testing</em> and an
+<em>unstable</em> distribution available, and a <em>frozen</em> distribution
+shows up for a couple of months from time to time.
 
 
        <sect1>Experimental
 
 
        <sect1>Experimental
+<!-- Note: experimental is currently dead because of the package pools.
+     Once that changes, the description below will most probably need
+     adjustments. -->
          <p>
 The <em>experimental</em> distribution is a specialty distribution.
 It is not a full distribution in the same sense as `stable' and
          <p>
 The <em>experimental</em> distribution is a specialty distribution.
 It is not a full distribution in the same sense as `stable' and
@@ -833,13 +853,13 @@ version. That's the reason why the first official Debian release was
 1.1, and not 1.0.)
        <p>
 Thus, the names of the distribution directories in the archive are
 1.1, and not 1.0.)
        <p>
 Thus, the names of the distribution directories in the archive are
-determined by their code names and not their release status (i.e.,
+determined by their code names and not their release status (e.g.,
 `slink').  These names stay the same during the development period and
 after the release; symbolic links, which can be changed easily,
 indicate the currently released stable distribution.  That's why the
 real distribution directories use the <em>code names</em>, while symbolic
 `slink').  These names stay the same during the development period and
 after the release; symbolic links, which can be changed easily,
 indicate the currently released stable distribution.  That's why the
 real distribution directories use the <em>code names</em>, while symbolic
-links for <em>stable</em>, <em>unstable</em>, and <em>frozen</em>
-point to the appropriate release directories.
+links for <em>stable</em>, <em>testing</em>, <em>unstable</em>, and
+<em>frozen</em> point to the appropriate release directories.
 
 
     <chapt id="upload">Package uploads
 
 
     <chapt id="upload">Package uploads
@@ -920,16 +940,17 @@ Notably, the <tt>Distribution</tt> field, which originates from the
 <file>debian/changelog</file> file, indicates which distribution the
 package is intended for.  There are four possible values for this
 field: `stable', `unstable', `frozen', or `experimental'; these values
 <file>debian/changelog</file> file, indicates which distribution the
 package is intended for.  There are four possible values for this
 field: `stable', `unstable', `frozen', or `experimental'; these values
-can also be combined.  For instance, if you have a crucial security
-fix release of a package, and the package has not diverged between the
-<em>stable</em> and <em>unstable</em> distributions, then you might
-put `stable unstable' in the <file>changelog</file>'s
-<tt>Distribution</tt> field.  Or, if Debian has been frozen, and you
+can also be combined. Or, if Debian has been frozen, and you
 want to get a bug-fix release into <em>frozen</em>, you would set the
 distribution to `frozen unstable'.  (See <ref id="upload-frozen"> for
 more information on when to upload to <em>frozen</em>.)  Note that it
 never makes sense to combine the <em>experimental</em> distribution with
 want to get a bug-fix release into <em>frozen</em>, you would set the
 distribution to `frozen unstable'.  (See <ref id="upload-frozen"> for
 more information on when to upload to <em>frozen</em>.)  Note that it
 never makes sense to combine the <em>experimental</em> distribution with
-anything else.  Also note that setting the distribution to `stable' means
+anything else.
+         <p>
+You should avoid combining `stable' with others because of potential
+problems with library dependencies (for your package and for the package
+built by the build daemons for other architecture).
+Also note that setting the distribution to `stable' means
 that the package will be placed into the <tt>proposed-updates</tt>
 directory of the Debian archive for further testing before it is actually
 included in <em>stable</em>. The Release Team (which can be reached at
 that the package will be placed into the <tt>proposed-updates</tt>
 directory of the Debian archive for further testing before it is actually
 included in <em>stable</em>. The Release Team (which can be reached at
@@ -1545,7 +1566,7 @@ In a binary NMU, no real changes are being made to the source.  You do
 not need to touch any of the files in the source package.  This
 includes <file>debian/changelog</file>.
        <p>
 not need to touch any of the files in the source package.  This
 includes <file>debian/changelog</file>.
        <p>
-Sometimes you need to recompile a packages against other packages
+Sometimes you need to recompile a package against other packages
 which have been updated, such as libraries.  You do have to bump the
 version number in this case, so that the upgrade system can function
 properly.  Even so, these are considered binary-only NMUs -- there is
 which have been updated, such as libraries.  You do have to bump the
 version number in this case, so that the upgrade system can function
 properly.  Even so, these are considered binary-only NMUs -- there is