chiark / gitweb /
cleanup patch from Adam Garside, some of it fine tuned by myself, closes: #203202
authorjoy <joy@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:11:22 +0000 (19:11 +0000)
committerjoy <joy@313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d>
Thu, 28 Aug 2003 19:11:22 +0000 (19:11 +0000)
git-svn-id: svn://anonscm.debian.org/ddp/manuals/trunk/developers-reference@2408 313b444b-1b9f-4f58-a734-7bb04f332e8d

developers-reference.sgml

index a4118fb..89ba78f 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
   <!ENTITY % commondata  SYSTEM "common.ent" > %commondata;
 
   <!-- CVS revision of this document -->
-  <!ENTITY cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.220 $">
+  <!ENTITY cvs-rev "$Revision: 1.221 $">
   <!-- if you are translating this document, please notate the CVS
        revision of the developers reference here -->
   <!--
@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ To apply as a new maintainer, you need an existing Debian maintainer
 to verify your application (an <em>advocate</em>).  After you have
 contributed to Debian for a while, and you want to apply to become a
 registered developer, an existing developer with whom you
-have worked over the past months has to express his belief that you
+have worked over the past months has to express their belief that you
 can contribute to Debian successfully.
        <p>
 When you have found an advocate, have your GnuPG key signed and have
@@ -1574,7 +1574,7 @@ Changelog entries can be used to automatically close Debian bugs when
 the package is installed into the archive.  See <ref
 id="upload-bugfix">.
          <p>
-It is conventional that the changelog entry notating of a package that
+It is conventional that the changelog entry of a package that
 contains a new upstream version of the software looks like this:
 <example>
   * new upstream version
@@ -1705,8 +1705,8 @@ appropriate <file>proposed-updates</file> archive when the advisory is
 released.  See <ref id="bug-security"> for detailed information on
 handling security problems.
          <p>
-It is discouraged to change anything else in the package that isn't
-important, because even trivial fixes can cause bugs later on.
+Changing anything else in the package that isn't important is discouraged,
+because even trivial fixes can cause bugs later on.
          <p>
 Packages uploaded to <em>stable</em> need to be compiled on systems running
 <em>stable</em>, so that their dependencies are limited to the libraries
@@ -1754,7 +1754,7 @@ to transfer the files, place them into &us-upload-dir;;
 if you use anonymous FTP to upload, place them into
 &upload-queue;.
          <p>
-If you want to use feature described in <ref id="delayed-incoming">,
+If you want to use the feature described in <ref id="delayed-incoming">,
 you'll have to upload to <tt>ftp-master</tt>.  It is the only upload
 point that supports delayed incoming.
          <p>
@@ -2043,14 +2043,14 @@ Here's a list of steps that you may follow to handle a bug report:
 Decide whether the report corresponds to a real bug or not. Sometimes
 users are just calling a program in the wrong way because they haven't
 read the documentation. If you diagnose this, just close the bug with
-enough information to let the user correct his problem (give pointers
+enough information to let the user correct their problem (give pointers
 to the good documentation and so on). If the same report comes up
 again and again you may ask yourself if the documentation is good
 enough or if the program shouldn't detect its misuse in order to
 give an informative error message. This is an issue that may need
 to be brought to the upstream author.
     <p>
-If the bug submitter disagree with your decision to close the bug,
+If the bug submitter disagrees with your decision to close the bug,
 they may reopen it until you find an agreement on how to handle it.
 If you don't find any, you may want to tag the bug <tt>wontfix</tt>
 to let people know that the bug exists but that it won't be corrected.
@@ -2061,10 +2061,10 @@ the BTS if you wish to keep it reported against your package). Before
 doing so, please read the <url id="&url-tech-ctte;" name="recommended procedure">.
     <item>
 If the bug is real but it's caused by another package, just reassign
-the bug the right package. If you don't know which package it should
+the bug to the right package. If you don't know which package it should
 be reassigned to, you may either ask for help on &email-debian-devel; or
 reassign it to <package>debian-policy</package> to let them decide which
-package is in fault.
+package is at fault.
     <p>
 Sometimes you also have to adjust the severity of the bug so that it
 matches our definition of the severity. That's because people tend to
@@ -2072,8 +2072,8 @@ inflate the severity of bugs to make sure their bugs are fixed quickly.
 Some bugs may even be dropped to wishlist severity when the requested
 change is just cosmetic.
     <item>
-The bug submitter may have forgotten to provide some information, in that
-case you have to ask him the information required. You may use the
+The bug submitter may have forgotten to provide some information, in which
+case you have to ask them the required information. You may use the
 <tt>moreinfo</tt> tag to mark the bug as such. Moreover if you can't
 reproduce the bug, you tag it <tt>unreproducible</tt>. Anyone who
 can reproduce the bug is then invited to provide more information
@@ -2149,7 +2149,7 @@ changelog as described above.  If you simply want to close bugs that
 don't have anything to do with an upload you made, do it by emailing
 an explanation to <email>XXX-done@&bugs-host;</email>.  Do
 <strong>not</strong> close bugs in the changelog entry of a version if
-the changes in that version of the package doesn't have any bearing on
+the changes in that version of the package don't have any bearing on
 the bug.
          <p>
 For general information on how to write your changelog entries, see
@@ -2209,7 +2209,7 @@ There are a few ways a developer can learn of a security problem:
 <list compact>
     <item>he notices it on a public forum (mailing list, web site, etc.)
     <item>someone files a bug report
-    <item>someone informs him via private email
+    <item>someone informs them via private email
 </list>
 
  In the first two cases, the information is public and it is important
@@ -2243,7 +2243,7 @@ itself is public, and can (and will) be examined by the general public.
 
 <p>
 There are two reasons for releasing information even though secrecy is
-requested: the problem has been known for a while, or that the problem
+requested: the problem has been known for a while, or the problem
 or exploit has become public.
 
         <sect2 id="bug-security-advisories">Security Advisories
@@ -2463,9 +2463,9 @@ avoid unwanted removals and to keep a trace of why a package has been
 removed. For example, you can provide the name of the package that
 supersedes the one to be removed.
        <p>
-Usually you only ask the removal of a package maintained by yourself.
+Usually you only ask for the removal of a package maintained by yourself.
 If you want to remove another package, you have to get the approval
-of its last maintainer.
+of its maintainer.
        <p>
 If in doubt concerning whether a package is disposable, email
 &email-debian-devel; asking for opinions.  Also of interest is the
@@ -2473,6 +2473,7 @@ If in doubt concerning whether a package is disposable, email
 package.  When invoked as <tt>apt-cache showpkg
 <var>package</var></tt>, the program will show details for
 <var>package</var>, including reverse depends.
+Removal of orphaned packages is discussed on &email-debian-qa;.
        <p>
 Once the package has been removed, the package's bugs should be handled.
 They should either be reassigned to another package in the case where
@@ -2485,7 +2486,7 @@ software is simply no more part of Debian.
 In the past, it was possible to remove packages from <file>incoming</file>.
 However, with the introduction of the new incoming system, this is no longer
 possible.  Instead, you have to upload a new revision of your package with
-a higher version as the package you want to replace.  Both versions will be
+a higher version than the package you want to replace.  Both versions will be
 installed in the archive but only the higher version will actually be
 available in <em>unstable</em> since the previous version will immediately
 be replaced by the higher.  However, if you do proper testing of your
@@ -2493,8 +2494,8 @@ packages, the need to replace a package should not occur too often anyway.
 
       <sect1>Replacing or renaming packages
        <p>
-Sometimes you made a mistake naming the package and you need to rename
-it.  In this case, you need to follow a two-step process.  First, set
+When you make a mistake naming your package, you should follow a two-step
+process to rename it. First, set
 your <file>debian/control</file> file to replace and conflict with the
 obsolete name of the package (see the <url id="&url-debian-policy;"
 name="Debian Policy Manual"> for details).  Once you've uploaded
@@ -2579,7 +2580,7 @@ portability.  Therefore, even if you are not a porter, you should read
 most of this chapter.
       <p>
 Porting is the act of building Debian packages for architectures that
-is different from the original architecture of the package
+are different from the original architecture of the package
 maintainer's binary package.  It is a unique and essential activity.
 In fact, porters do most of the actual compiling of Debian packages.
 For instance, for a single <em>i386</em> binary package, there must be
@@ -2596,7 +2597,7 @@ the case.  This section contains a checklist of ``gotchas'' often
 committed by Debian maintainers &mdash; common problems which often stymie
 porters, and make their jobs unnecessarily difficult.
        <p>
-The first and most important watchword is to respond quickly to bug or
+The first and most important thing is to respond quickly to bug or
 issues raised by porters.  Please treat porters with courtesy, as if
 they were in fact co-maintainers of your package (which in a way, they
 are).  Please be tolerant of succinct or even unclear bug reports,
@@ -2645,7 +2646,7 @@ They should be removed by the `clean' target of
 Make sure you don't rely on locally installed or hacked configurations
 or programs.  For instance, you should never be calling programs in
 <file>/usr/local/bin</file> or the like.  Try not to rely on programs
-be setup in a special way.  Try building your package on another
+being setup in a special way.  Try building your package on another
 machine, even if it's the same architecture.
            <item>
 Don't depend on the package you're building already being installed (a
@@ -2758,7 +2759,7 @@ Porters may also have an unofficial location where they can put the
 results of their work during the waiting period.  This helps others
 running the port have the benefit of the porter's work, even during
 the waiting period.  Of course, such locations have no official
-blessing or status, so buyer, beware.
+blessing or status, so buyer beware.
 
 
       <sect1 id="porter-automation">
@@ -2832,7 +2833,7 @@ called a non-maintainer upload, or NMU.
 Debian porters, who compile packages for different architectures,
 occasionally do binary-only NMUs as part of their porting activity
 (see <ref id="porting">).  Another reason why NMUs are done is when a
-Debian developers needs to fix another developers' packages in order to
+Debian developer needs to fix another developer's packages in order to
 address serious security problems or crippling bugs, especially during
 the freeze, or when the package maintainer is unable to release a fix
 in a timely fashion.
@@ -2913,12 +2914,12 @@ Make sure that the package's bugs that the NMU is meant to address are all
 filed in the Debian Bug Tracking System (BTS).
 If they are not, submit them immediately.
            <item>
-Wait a few days the response from the maintainer. If you don't get
-any response, you may want to help him by sending the patch that fixes
+Wait a few days for the response from the maintainer. If you don't get
+any response, you may want to help them by sending the patch that fixes
 the bug. Don't forget to tag the bug with the "patch" keyword.
            <item>
 Wait a few more days. If you still haven't got an answer from the
-maintainer, send him a mail announcing your intent to NMU the package.
+maintainer, send them a mail announcing your intent to NMU the package.
 Prepare an NMU as described in <ref id="nmu-guidelines">, test it
 carefully on your machine (cf. <ref id="sanitycheck">).
 Double check that your patch doesn't have any unexpected side effects.
@@ -2946,8 +2947,8 @@ and act later.
        <p>
 The following applies to porters insofar as they are playing the dual
 role of being both package bug-fixers and package porters.  If a
-porter has to change the Debian source archive, automatically their
-upload is a source NMU and is subject to its rules.  If a porter is
+porter has to change the Debian source archive, their upload is
+automatically a source NMU and is subject to its rules.  If a porter is
 simply uploading a recompiled binary package, the rules are different;
 see <ref id="porter-guidelines">.
        <p>
@@ -3073,7 +3074,7 @@ In any case, you should not be upset by the NMU. An NMU is not a
 personal attack against the maintainer. It is a proof that
 someone cares enough about the package and that they were willing to help
 you in your work, so you should be thankful. You may also want to
-ask them if they would be interested to help you on a more frequent
+ask them if they would be interested in helping you on a more frequent
 basis as co-maintainer or backup maintainer
 (see <ref id="collaborative-maint">).
 
@@ -3089,7 +3090,7 @@ packages in which a priority of <tt>Standard</tt> or which are part of
 the base set have co-maintainers.</p>
         <p>
 Generally there is a primary maintainer and one or more
-co-maintainers.  The primary maintainer is the whose name is listed in
+co-maintainers.  The primary maintainer is the person whose name is listed in
 the <tt>Maintainer</tt> field of the <file>debian/control</file> file.
 Co-maintainers are all the other maintainers.</p>
         <p>