chiark / gitweb /
debian/changelog: Start new version 0.3.2~~
[secnet.git] / NOTES
1 * Design of new, multi-subnet secnet protocol
2
3 Like the first (1995/6) version, we're tunnelling IP packets inside
4 UDP packets. To defeat various restrictions which may be imposed on us
5 by network providers (like the prohibition of incoming TCP
6 connections) we're sticking with UDP for everything this time,
7 including key setup. This means we have to handle retries, etc.
8
9 Other new features include being able to deal with subnets hidden
10 behind changing 'real' IP addresses, and the ability to choose
11 algorithms and keys per pair of communicating sites.
12
13 ** Configuration and structure
14
15 [The original plan]
16
17 The network is made up from a number of 'sites'. These are collections
18 of machines with private IP addresses. The new secnet code runs on
19 machines which have interfaces on the private site network and some
20 way of accessing the 'real' internet.
21
22 Each end of a tunnel is identified by a name. Often it will be
23 convenient for every gateway machine to use the same name for each
24 tunnel endpoint, but this is not vital. Individual tunnels are
25 identified by their two endpoint names.
26
27 [The new plan]
28
29 It appears that people want to be able to use secnet on mobile
30 machines like laptops as well as to interconnect sites. In particular,
31 they want to be able to use their laptop in three situations:
32
33 1) connected to their internal LAN by a cable; no tunnel involved
34 2) connected via wireless, using a tunnel to protect traffic
35 3) connected to some other network, using a tunnel to access the
36 internal LAN.
37
38 They want the laptop to keep the same IP address all the time.
39
40 Case (1) is simple.
41
42 Case (2) requires that the laptop run a copy of secnet, and have a
43 tunnel configured between it and the main internal LAN default
44 gateway. secnet must support the concept of a 'soft' tunnel where it
45 adds a route and causes the gateway to do proxy-ARP when the tunnel is
46 up, and removes the route again when the tunnel is down.
47
48 The usual prohibition of packets coming in from one tunnel and going
49 out another must be relaxed in this case (in particular, the
50 destination address of packets from these 'mobile station' tunnels may
51 be another tunnel as well as the host).
52
53 (Quick sanity check: if chiark's secnet address was in
54 192.168.73.0/24, would this work properly? Yes, because there will be
55 an explicit route to it, and proxy ARP will be done for it. Do we want
56 packets from the chiark tunnel to be able to go out along other
57 routes? No. So, spotting a 'local' address in a remote site's list of
58 networks isn't sufficient to switch on routing for a site. We need an
59 explicit option. NB packets may be routed if the source OR the
60 destination is marked as allowing routing [otherwise packets couldn't
61 get back from eg. chiark to a laptop at greenend]).
62
63 [the even newer plan]
64
65 secnet sites are configured to grant access to particular IP address
66 ranges to the holder of a particular public key.  The key can certify
67 other keys, which will then be permitted to use a subrange of the IP
68 address range of the certifying key.
69
70 This means that secnet won't know in advance (i.e. at configuration
71 time) how many tunnels it might be required to support, so we have to
72 be able to create them (and routes, and so on) on the fly.
73
74 ** VPN-level configuration
75
76 At a high level we just want to be able to indicate which groups of
77 users can claim ownership of which ranges of IP addresses. Assuming
78 these users (or their representatives) all have accounts on a single
79 machine, we can automate the submission of keys and other information
80 to make up a 'sites' file for the entire VPN.
81
82 The distributed 'sites' file should be in a more restricted format
83 than the secnet configuration file, to prevent attackers who manage to
84 distribute bogus sites files from taking over their victim's machines.
85
86 The distributed 'sites' file is read one line at a time. Each line
87 consists of a keyword followed by other information. It defines a
88 number of VPNs; within each VPN it defines a number of locations;
89 within each location it defines a number of sites. These VPNs,
90 locations and sites are turned into a secnet.conf file fragment using
91 a script.
92
93 Some keywords are valid at any 'level' of the distributed 'sites'
94 file, indicating defaults.
95
96 The keywords are:
97
98 vpn n: we are now declaring information to do with VPN 'n'. Must come first.
99
100 location n: we are now declaring information for location 'n'.
101
102 site n: we are now declaring information for site 'n'.
103 endsite: we're finished declaring information for the current site
104
105 restrict-nets a b c ...: restrict the allowable 'networks' for the current
106   level to those in this list.
107 end-definitions: prevent definition of further vpns and locations, and
108   modification of defaults at VPN level
109
110 dh x y: the current VPN uses the specified group; x=modulus, y=generator
111
112 hash x: which hash function to use. Valid options are 'md5' and 'sha1'.
113
114 admin n: administrator email address for current level
115
116 key-lifetime n
117 setup-retries n
118 setup-timeout n
119 wait-time n
120 renegotiate-time n
121
122 address a b: a=dnsname, b=port
123 networks a b c ...
124 pubkey x y z: x=keylen, y=encryption key, z=modulus
125 mobile: declare this to be a 'mobile' site
126
127 ** Logging etc.
128
129 There are several possible ways of running secnet:
130
131 'reporting' only: --version, --help, etc. command line options and the
132 --just-check-config mode.
133
134 'normal' run: perform setup in the foreground, and then background.
135
136 'failed' run: setup in the foreground, and terminate with an error
137 before going to background.
138
139 'reporting' modes should never output anything except to stdout/stderr.
140 'normal' and 'failed' runs output to stdout/stderr before
141 backgrounding, then thereafter output only to log destinations.
142
143 ** Protocols
144
145 *** Protocol environment:
146
147 Each gateway machine serves a particular, well-known set of private IP
148 addresses (i.e. the agreement over which addresses it serves is
149 outside the scope of this discussion). Each gateway machine has an IP
150 address on the interconnecting network (usually the Internet), which
151 may be dynamically allocated and may change at any point.
152
153 Each gateway knows the RSA public keys of the other gateways with
154 which it wishes to communicate. The mechanism by which this happens is
155 outside the scope of this discussion. There exists a means by which
156 each gateway can look up the probable IP address of any other.
157
158 *** Protocol goals:
159
160 The ultimate goal of the protocol is for the originating gateway
161 machine to be able to forward packets from its section of the private
162 network to the appropriate gateway machine for the destination
163 machine, in such a way that it can be sure that the packets are being
164 sent to the correct destination machine, the destination machine can
165 be sure that the source of the packets is the originating gateway
166 machine, and the contents of the packets cannot be understood other
167 than by the two communicating gateways.
168
169 XXX not sure about the address-change stuff; leave it out of the first
170 version of the protocol. From experience, IP addresses seem to be
171 quite stable so the feature doesn't gain us much.
172
173 **** Protocol sub-goal 1: establish a shared key
174
175 Definitions:
176
177 A is the originating gateway machine name
178 B is the destination gateway machine name
179 A+ and B+ are the names with optional additional data, see below
180 PK_A is the public RSA key of A
181 PK_B is the public RSA key of B
182 PK_A^-1 is the private RSA key of A
183 PK_B^-1 is the private RSA key of B
184 x is the fresh private DH key of A
185 y is the fresh private DH key of B
186 k is g^xy mod m
187 g and m are generator and modulus for Diffie-Hellman
188 nA is a nonce generated by A
189 nB is a nonce generated by B
190 iA is an index generated by A, to be used in packets sent from B to A
191 iB is an index generated by B, to be used in packets sent from A to B
192 i? is appropriate index for receiver
193
194 Note that 'i' may be re-used from one session to the next, whereas 'n'
195 is always fresh.
196
197 The optional additional data after the sender's name consists of some
198 initial subset of the following list of items:
199  * A 32-bit integer with a set of capability flags, representing the
200    abilities of the sender.
201  * In MSG3/MSG4: a 16-bit integer being the sender's MTU, or zero.
202    (In other messages: nothing.)  See below.
203  * More data which is yet to be defined and which must be ignored
204    by receivers.
205 The optional additional data after the receiver's name is not
206 currently used.  If any is seen, it must be ignored.
207
208 Capability flag bits must be in one the following two categories:
209
210 1. Early capability flags must be advertised in MSG1 or MSG2, as
211    applicable.  If MSG3 or MSG4 advertise any "early" capability bits,
212    MSG1 or MSG3 (as applicable) must have advertised them too.  Sadly,
213    advertising an early capability flag will produce MSG1s which are
214    not understood by versions of secnet which predate the capability
215    mechanism.
216
217 2. Late capability flags are advertised in MSG2 or MSG3, as
218    applicable.  They may also appear in MSG1, but this is not
219    guaranteed.  MSG4 must advertise the same set as MSG2.
220
221 No capability flags are currently defined.  Unknown capability flags
222 should be treated as late ones.
223
224
225 MTU handling
226
227 In older versions of secnet, secnet was not capable of fragmentation
228 or sending ICMP Frag Needed.  Administrators were expected to configure
229 consistent MTUs across the network.
230
231 It is still the case in the current version that the MTUs need to be
232 configured reasonably coherently across the network: the allocated
233 buffer sizes must be sufficient to cope with packets from all other
234 peers.
235
236 However, provided the buffers are sufficient, all packets will be
237 processed properly: a secnet receiving a packet larger than the
238 applicable MTU for its delivery will either fragment it, or reject it
239 with ICMP Frag Needed.
240
241 The MTU additional data field allows secnet to advertise an MTU to the
242 peer.  This allows the sending end to handle overlarge packets, before
243 they are transmitted across the underlying public network.  This can
244 therefore be used to work around underlying network braindamage
245 affecting large packets.
246
247 If the MTU additional data field is zero or not present, then the peer
248 should use locally-configured MTU information (normally, its local
249 netlink MTU) instead.
250
251 If it is nonzero, the peer may send packets up to the advertised size
252 (and if that size is bigger than the peer's administratively
253 configured size, the advertiser promises that its buffers can handle
254 such a large packet).
255
256 A secnet instance should not assume that just because it has
257 advertised an mtu which is lower than usual for the vpn, the peer will
258 honour it, unless the administrator knows that the peers are
259 sufficiently modern to understand the mtu advertisement option.  So
260 secnet will still accept packets which exceed the link MTU (whether
261 negotiated or assumed).
262
263
264 Messages:
265
266 1) A->B: *,iA,msg1,A+,B+,nA
267
268 i* must be encoded as 0.  (However, it is permitted for a site to use
269 zero as its "index" for another site.)
270
271 2) B->A: iA,iB,msg2,B+,A+,nB,nA
272
273 (The order of B and A reverses in alternate messages so that the same
274 code can be used to construct them...)
275
276 3) A->B: {iB,iA,msg3,A+,B+,[chosen-transform],nA,nB,g^x mod m}_PK_A^-1
277
278 If message 1 was a replay then A will not generate message 3, because
279 it doesn't recognise nA.
280
281 If message 2 was from an attacker then B will not generate message 4,
282 because it doesn't recognise nB.
283
284 4) B->A: {iA,iB,msg4,B+,A+,nB,nA,g^y mod m}_PK_B^-1
285
286 At this point, A and B share a key, k. B must keep retransmitting
287 message 4 until it receives a packet encrypted using key k.
288
289 5) A: iB,iA,msg5,(ping/msg5)_k
290
291 6) B: iA,iB,msg6,(pong/msg6)_k
292
293 (Note that these are encrypted using the same transform that's used
294 for normal traffic, so they include sequence number, MAC, etc.)
295
296 The ping and pong messages can be used by either end of the tunnel at
297 any time, but using msg0 as the unencrypted message type indicator.
298
299 **** Protocol sub-goal 2: end the use of a shared key
300
301 7) i?,i?,msg0,(end-session/msg7,A,B)_k
302
303 This message can be sent by either party. Once sent, k can be
304 forgotten. Once received and checked, k can be forgotten. No need to
305 retransmit or confirm reception. It is suggested that this message be
306 sent when a key times out, or the tunnel is forcibly terminated for
307 some reason.
308
309 **** Protocol sub-goal 3: send a packet
310
311 8) i?,i?,msg0,(send-packet/msg9,packet)_k
312
313 **** Other messages
314
315 9) i?,i?,NAK (NAK is encoded as zero)
316
317 If the link-layer can't work out what to do with a packet (session has
318 gone away, etc.) it can transmit a NAK back to the sender.
319
320 This can alert the sender to the situation where the sender has a key
321 but the receiver doesn't (eg because it has been restarted).  The
322 sender, on receiving the NAK, will try to initiate a key exchange.
323
324 Forged (or overly delayed) NAKs can cause wasted resources due to
325 spurious key exchange initiation, but there is a limit on this because
326 of the key exchange retry timeout.
327
328 10) i?,i?,msg8,A,B,nA,nB,msg?
329
330 This is an obsolete form of NAK packet which is not sent by any even
331 vaguely recent version of secnet.  (In fact, there is no evidence in
332 the git history of it ever being sent.)
333
334 This message number is reserved.
335
336 11) *,*,PROD,A,B
337
338 Sent in response to a NAK from B to A.  Requests that B initiates a
339 key exchange with A, if B is willing and lacks a transport key for A.
340 (If B doesn't have A's address configured, implicitly supplies A's
341 public address.)
342
343 This is necessary because if one end of a link (B) is restarted while
344 a key exchange is in progress, the following bad state can persist:
345 the non-restarted end (A) thinks that the key is still valid and keeps
346 sending packets, but B either doesn't realise that a key exchange with
347 A is necessary or (if A is a mobile site) doesn't know A's public IP
348 address.
349
350 Normally in these circumstances B would send NAKs to A, causing A to
351 initiate a key exchange.  However if A and B were already in the
352 middle of a key exchange then A will not want to try another one until
353 the first one has timed out ("setup-time" x "setup-retries") and then
354 the key exchange retry timeout ("wait-time") has elapsed.
355
356 However if B's setup has timed out, B would be willing to participate
357 in a key exchange initiated by A, if A could be induced to do so.
358 This is the purpose of the PROD packet.
359
360 We send no more PRODs than we would want to send data packets, to
361 avoid a traffic amplification attack.  We also send them only in state
362 WAIT, as in other states we wouldn't respond favourably.  And we only
363 honour them if we don't already have a key.
364
365 With PROD, the period of broken communication due to a key exchange
366 interrupted by a restart is limited to the key exchange total
367 retransmission timeout, rather than also including the key exchange
368 retry timeout.