<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">2014-12-04 21:13 GMT+00:00 Derek Fawcus <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:dfawcus+lists-ukcrypto@employees.org" target="_blank">dfawcus+lists-</a></span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
I recall reading about a Scottish Court decision (Court of Session?),<br>
which established that despite the notes in circulation not being legal tender,<br>
for practical purposes they have to be treated as if they were.<br>
<br>
Some guy had chosen to pay his council tax in cash, the council refused,<br>
and it went to court. The decision was that it would not be sensible<br>
for the council to refuse payment by notes in favour of 1 pound coins,<br>
and hence the council had to accept the notes.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The nearest I can find is this:</div><br>"Mr Coppel submits that the only form of payment that the Council are obliged to accept as a matter of law is cash in legal tender, unless they agree otherwise. As a matter of strict theory that may be right, although I venture to suggest that a Council which required parking contraveners to pay cash in notes, or coins of 1 or higher value (current legal tender) would be vulnerable to a challenge on grounds of rationality."<div></div><div><a href="http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2011/295.html">http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2011/295.html</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>(concerning a surcharge for using credit cards)</div></div><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature">Francis Davey<br><br></div>
</div></div>