<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 20 August 2013 16:53, Peter Fairbrother¬†wrote:</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">


Anyway, I was looking at paragraph 2 of Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000, and saw that apart from some Northern-Ireland-specific stuff, the only purpose for which a person can be questioned (or detained) under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000 is<br>



<br>
"for the purpose of determining whether he appears to be a person falling within section 40(1)(b)"<br>
<br>
i.e. whether he appears to be<br>
<br>
"a person who ... is or has been concerned in the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism."<br>
<br>
As far as I can tell, what reportedly happened to Miranda isn't anywhere near that.<br>
<br>
Scotland Yard claim it was lawful, but I can't see how it could be.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style>This was one of the grounds raised by Bindmans:</div><div style><br></div><div style><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2013/aug/20/david-miranda-letter-home-office">http://www.theguardian.com/world/interactive/2013/aug/20/david-miranda-letter-home-office</a></div>

<div style><br></div><div style>--¬†</div><div style>Igor M.¬†</div></div><br></div></div>